Western Siberia special issue

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  • This article was downloaded by: [Karolinska Institutet, University Library]On: 10 October 2014, At: 05:17Publisher: RoutledgeInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registeredoffice: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

    International Journal of EnvironmentalStudiesPublication details, including instructions for authors andsubscription information:http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/genv20

    Western Siberia special issueSergey N. Kirpotin aa Tomsk State University , Tomsk, RussiaPublished online: 01 Oct 2009.

    To cite this article: Sergey N. Kirpotin (2009) Western Siberia special issue, International Journal ofEnvironmental Studies, 66:4, 403-404, DOI: 10.1080/00207230902913890

    To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207230902913890

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  • International Journal of Environmental Studies,Vol. 66, No. 4, August 2009, 403404

    International Journal of Environmental StudiesISSN 0020-7233 print: ISSN 1029-0400 online 2009 Taylor & Francis

    http://www.tandf.co.uk/journalsDOI: 10.1080/00207230902913890

    Foreword

    Western Siberia special issue

    Taylor and FrancisGENV_A_391561.sgm10.1080/00207230902913890International Journal of Environmental Studies0020-7233 (print)/1029-0400 (online)Original Article2009Taylor & Francis0000000002009SergeyKirpotinkirp@ums.tsu.ru

    This special issue focuses on the biospheric climate regulation role of West-Siberianwetlands and some significant bio-indicators of climatic changes in this Region. Northwest-ern Siberia is a unique wetland area. About 104 Mha of Russian peatlands are located here.They consist almost entirely of pristine peatland ecosystems. Siberian peatlands have been amajor sink of atmospheric carbon since the last deglaciation, storing almost one quarter of theterrestrial carbon. But, in some epochs, like the present, they are the most powerful source ofmethane emission. Changes in Northwestern Siberia are more dramatic than in other northernregions because of the continental type of climate here which provides more sharp environ-mental shifts.

    The role of the Northwestern Siberian peatlands should be adequately taken into account indeveloping sensitive and accurate global climatic and carbon cycle models. One of the goldkeys to regulate the process of global warming is hidden in the vast bogs of Western Siberia.In this connection the role of this region in the worlds future is immense.

    In the first paper, Kirpotin, Dupre and co-workers consider the role of the WesternSiberian peatlands in a global carbon balance and their possible influence on the formation ofEarths climate.

    In the second paper, Kirpotin, Polishchuk and Bryksina consider peatlands of a permafrostzone of Western Siberia, especially palsas, which are a very sensitive indicator of climaticchanges. Thermokarst lakes as an invariable element of the palsa mire complex are the mostconvenient object for distant monitoring of the global warming influence on the state of thepermafrost rocks.

    The paper by Shirokova et al. reports on results of bacterio-plankton characterization inthaw lakes of the northern part of Western Siberia via measurement of the number of variousgroups of heterotrophic bacteria and the intensity of primary production/respiration in thewater column. A changed climate in this region will mean rising ground temperature andincreased precipitation. This will bring about further acceleration of dissolved organic matterdegradation in the water column and amplification of CO2 release to the atmosphere.

    Zakharova et al. consider the seasonal and interannual variability of the hydrologicalregime of rivers in the Northern part of Western Siberia (Poluy, Nadym, Pur and Taz),making use of historical data and satellite observations.

    The paper by Volkova et al. reports on one of the most interesting natural phenomena inthe mountains of Siberia. These are the peat-forming wetlands mires. Mountain mires act asnatural filters, reservoirs, and sources of clean water as well as providing a significant contri-bution to biodiversity.

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  • 404 S.N. Kirpotin

    Bazanov et al. give an account of a method of mapping of peatlands via remote sensing ofthe indicator properties of vegetation. This method allows us to study bogs on vast areaswhich are difficult of access. It is planned to use the received maps for interpretation of theground research data on the balance of greenhouse gases in the taiga zone landscapes of theregion.

    Kosykh et al. consider data on carbon, nitrogen and potassium element storages in thephytomass, mortmass and bog ecosystem production of the middle taiga in Western Siberia.

    Babenko discusses the problem of dissemination in the region of the most dangerous agri-cultural pests in recent decades as a result of global climate change.

    And last but not least, Plekhanov gives a detailed account of the century-old mystery of theTunguska phenomenon. This paper opens up for the first time the extensive data which havebeen collected by the Complex Amateur Expedition organized by Tomsk State Universityhalf a century ago.

    Northwestern Siberia provides unimpeachable evidence for global warming. This cannotbe ignored.

    Sergey N. KirpotinTomsk State University

    Tomsk, Russia

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