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Weihnachten #1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79 · 2013. 2. 18. · Teacher Handbook For Weihnachten (#1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79) By Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847) Created by Becca

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Text of Weihnachten #1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79 · 2013. 2. 18. · Teacher Handbook For Weihnachten (#1 of...

  • Weihnachten (#1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79) Composer: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix

    Voicing: SSAATTBB

    Style: Sacred

    Genre: Motet

    Language: German

    Instruments: A Cappella

    License: CPDL (www.cpdl.org)

    Published: Mendelssohn ’s Werke (1874-1877)

  • Teacher Handbook For Weihnachten (#1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79)

    By Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847)

    Created by Becca Cline

    National Standards:

    Standard
1:
Singing,
alone
and
with
others,
a
varied
repertoire
of
music.
Standard
2:
Performing
on
instruments,
alone
and
with
others,
a
varied
repertoire
of
music.
Standard
3:
Improvising
melodies,
variations
and
accompaniments.
Standard
4:
Composing
and
arranging
music
within
specific
guidelines.
Standard
5:
Reading
and
notating
music.
Standard
6:
Listening
to,
analyzing,
and
describing
music.
Standard
7:
Evaluating
music
and
music
performances.
Standard
8:
Understand
relationships
between
music,
the
other
arts,
and
disciplines
outside
of
the
arts.
Standard
9:
Understanding
music
in
relation
to
history
and
culture.
 Learning Objectives:

    1. Students
will
demonstrate
their
sight‐singing
ability
by
applying
correct
solfege
syllables
to
their
music
with
4
or
fewer
mistakes.
(Standards
1,5,6)


    2. By the end of this activity, 85% of students will:

a. Accurately perform their part using correct solfege syllables, pitches, and

    rhythms.(Standards 1,6) 
b. Students will create a creative and coherent journal entry analyzing their

    experience (using terminology discussed in class.)
(Standards
6,7) 3. Students will create a coherent and creative journal using content discussed in class to

    reflect on their group rehearsal. (Standard 6,7)



4. 



By the end of this lesson, at least 85% of the class will accurately:


    a. Show
the
phrasing
of
the
piece
using
body
motion
b. Aurally
identify
the
phrase
structure
of
the
piece

(Standards
5,6)


    5. 


Students
will
compose
and
perform
a
warm‐up
to
demonstrate
their
knowledge
of
the
harmonies
of
the
piece.
(Standards
1,3,5,6)


    6. 


By
the
end
of
this
activity
students
will



  • a. Create
a
Pinterest
board
detailing
information
about
the
composer
of
the
piece
(including
biographical
information,
historical
events
from
the
early
Romantic
period,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten).



    b. Teach
their
peers
about
the
composer,
based
on
their
findings.

i. During
this,
the
students
being
taught
must
record
notes
in
their


    journals.
(Standards
6,7,8,9)
7. 

Students
will
compose
a
new
rhythm
based
on
the
text
of
the
piece
(Standard
4)
8. 
Students
will
complete
a
WebQuest
activity,
guiding
them
to
compose
a
new
melody


    based
on
observed
art
and
the
text
of
the
piece.
(Standards
3,4,5,8,9)



    Score Study of Weihnachten 
 Element
 
 Information


    Composer:
Felix
Mendelssohn‐artholdy


    Felix
Mendelssohn
was
born
in
Hamburg,
on
February
3rd,
1809.
In
1843
he
founded
the
Leipzig
Conservatory,
and
was
named
director
of
the
Music
Section
of
the
Academy
of
Arts
in
Berlin
by
King
Frederick
of
Prussia.
And
though
his
schedule
was
quite
full,
it
was
during
this
time
that
he
wrote
the
Ruy
Blas
overture,
stage
music
for
Shakespear’s
“A
Midsummer
Night’s
Dream”
(which
contains
the
now
world‐famous
“Wedding
March”,
and
“The
Scottish
Symphony”,
which
was
the
third
of
five
symphonies
he
wrote
in
his
life
time.


    Style:
 Motet


    Sacred:
 This
is
a
sacred
motet
written
as
part
of
a
set
of
six
pieces
outlining
the
church
calendar.
The
text
is
based
on
Psalm
98


    Key:
 The
key
remains
in
G
Major
throughout


    Texture:
 Eight‐part,
SSAATTBB.
Homophonic
throughout.


    Form:
 Ternery
form
(ABBA)


    Meter:
 The
piece
typically
begins
at
a
moderato
(around
110)
and
gradually
retards
throughout,
until
the
end
approaches
adagio.


    Text:
 The
text
is
based
on
Psalm
98
and
is
one
of
six
pieces
written
to
follow
the
church
calendar.
This
particular
piece
was
written
in
celebration
of
Christmas,
and
was
actually
completed
on
Christmas
day
of
1843.


    Rhythm:
 Mostly
homorhythmic
throughout,
the
song
begins
with
the
women
declaring
“Rejoice,
all
ye
people!”,
and
the
men
come
in
at
the
close
of
that
first
statement
by
the
women
(measure
2),
and
have
their
own
text
and
rhythms
until
measure
6
at
which
time
the
choirs
sing
homorhythmically
until
measure
13.
At
this
point
each
line
has
something
different
until
measure
18
at
which
point
the


  • parts
come
together
again
rhythmically
until
measure
22,
and
then
the
women
come
together
in
the
pick‐ups
to
measure
29.
The
men
have
their
own
individual
rhythms
until
they
all
join
together
in
measure
30.
All
parts
end
in
a
triumphant
fermata.


    Melody:
 The
melody
is
expressed
by
the
women
in
unison
at
the
beginning
and
end
of
the
piece,
otherwise
the
emphasis
lies
in
the
homorhythmic
harmonies.


    Harmony:
 This
piece
is
extremely
harmonically
interesting.
We
begin
in
unison
until
mm
2,
and
then
we
see
several
ii
and
ii7
chords
throughout
in
mm
13,
15,
16,17,
20,
24,
25,
26,
and
28
and
a
V7/ii
going
to
ii
in
mm
7.
There
are
also
a
few
other
secondary
dominants
in
mm
7,
11,
and
22.
The
first
B
section
brings
an
interesting
tonality
that
plays
with
the
resolution
to
tonic,
but
we
don’t
actually
resolve
until
mm
19,
which
also
brings
in
the
second
B
section.
The
second
A
brings
the
return
of
women
in
unison,
but
this
time
the
baritones
and
bases
are
supporting
the
root,
while
the
tenor
twos
add
the
7th
of
our
V
chord,
and
then
resolve
down
as
we
all
reach
our
tonic.
We
then
return
to
V,
with
the
tenor
ones
sustaining
a
G
which
adds
a
brief
9th
to
our
chord,
and
our
baritones
have
the
7th.
We
once
again
resolve
to
tonic,
then
to
a
IV
9
(alto
ones
have
the
7th,
and
soprano
twos
have
the
9th)
and
finally
we
all
arrive
back
at
tonic.


    Phrasing:
 Short,
but
legato
lines,
usually
4‐5
measures
long.
There

are
obvious
places
to
breathe,
but
students
will
absolutely
be
recording
any
markings
I
have
indicated
in
the
score
that
allow
for
good
breath
to
support
the
line.
(One
example
of
this
is
mm
10;
students
will
make
the
second
half
note
of
this
measure
into
a
quarter
note,
and
add
in
a
quarter
rest.
This
will
allow
them
to
cut
off,
end
their
word,
and
begin
the
new
section
cleanly.


    Dynamics:
 This
piece
is
entirely
written
in
forte,
which
is
written
as
a
reminder
at
the
beginning
of
each
new
section,
and
again
for
the
final
halleluja.


    

Text Translation:

    Frohlocket,
ihr
Völker
auf
Erden,
und
preiset
Gott!



    Rejoice,
ye
people
of
the
earth,
and
praise
God!


    Der
Heiland
ist
ershienen,
den
der
Herr
verhißen.



  • The
redeemer
is
come,
whom
the
Lord
has
promised.


    Er
hat
seine
Gerechtigkeit
der
Weld
offenbaret.
Hallelujah!


    He
has
revealed
his
justice
to
the
world.
Hallelujah!


    Text
is
said
to
be
based
on
Psalm
98
which
says:


“Sing
to
the
Lord
a
new
song,


for
he
has
done
marvelous
things;

his
right
hand
and
his
holy
arm





have
worked
salvation
for
him.
2
The
Lord
has
made
his
salvation
known





and
revealed
his
righteousness
to
the
nations.
3
He
has
remembered
his
love





and
his
faithfulness
to
Israel;

all
the
ends
of
the
earth
have
seen
the
salvation
of
our
God.
4
shout
for
joy
to
the
Lord,
all
the
earth,


burst
into
jubilant
song
with
music;
5
make
music
to
the
Lord
with
the
harp,





with
the
harp
and
the
sound
of
singing,
6
with
trumpets
and
the
blast
of
the
ram’s
horn—




shout
for
joy
before
the
Lord,
the
King.
7
Let
the
sea
resound,
and
everything
in
it,





the
world,
and
all
who
live
in
it.
8
Let
the
rivers
clap
their
hands,




let
the
mountains
sing
together
for
joy;
9
let
them
sing
before
the
Lord,





for
he
comes
to
judge
the
earth.

He
will
judge
the
world
in
righteousness





and
the
peoples
with
equity.
“


    Activity #1 Instructional objective: Students
will
demonstrate
their
sight‐singing
ability
by
applying
correct
solfege
syllables
to
their
music
with
4
or
fewer
mistakes.
(Standards
1,5,6)

Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Sheet
music
• Piano
• Pencil


    Modalities
addressed:
Visual,
Kinesthetic,
and
Tactile
Warmup:
Students
will
sing
the
solfege
ladder
(do,
do‐re‐do,
do‐re‐mi‐re‐do,
etc).
Students
will
then
sight‐sing
melody
cards
located
at
the
front
of
the
room
(which
contain
melodic
sections
from
their
music)
using
solfege.
Activity:
Using
their
knowledge
of
solfege,
students
will
write
the
solfege
for
their
individual
part
into
their
music,
and
then
sing
the
piece
using
the
solfege
syllables.
This
will
ensure
that
students
understand
solfege,
and
can
use
solfege
as
a
tool
to
develop
their
aural
skills,
and
better
understand
their
music.
Below is an example of what an alto’s score should look like after writing in their solfege.

  • Assessment: The students will turn in their score for the teacher to examine. The teacher will check for correct solfege and completion. This assessment will ensure that students understand and can correctly apply solfege.

    Activity #2 Instructional objective: By the end of this activity, 85% of students will:

    • Accurately perform their part using correct solfege syllables, pitches, and rhythms.(Standards 1,6)

    • Students will create a creative and coherent journal entry analyzing their experience (using terminology discussed in class.)
(Standards
6,7)

    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
• Sheet
music
• Piano
• Journal
and
pencil
• Computer
with
recording
software,
or
some
other
recording
device
• Access
to
internet
to
email
their
recorded
work
to
the
teacher
• If
internet
is
not
available,
a
flash
drive
or
SD
card
with
the
video/audio
recording


    Modalities
addressed:
Aural
and
Kinesthetic
Warmup:
Students
will
sing
the
solfege
ladder
again.
This
time
when
they
get
to
the
top,
sopranos
will
stay
on
high
do,
altos
on
la,
tenors
on
fa,
and
basses
and
baritones
on
re,
and
then
ask
the
students
to
move
up
a
half
step
or
down
a
half
step
as
you
indicate,
and
finally,
ask
the
students
to
resolve
to
tonic.
This
is
a
great
exercise
to
get
the
students
really
listening.
Activity:
Students
will
video
or
audio
record
themselves
singing
their
parts
on
the
solfege
syllables
discovered
in
their
last
assignment.
This
activity
will
help
the
students
develop
individual
ownership
of
their
parts,
and
will
give
them
an
opportunity
to
practice
their
parts
outside
of
class.
They
will
also
listen
to
their
recording
and
comment
about
their
experience,
what
they
had
difficulties
with,
and
what
they
found
helpful
about
the
process
Assessment: The assignment will be graded by the following rubrics: Recording Elements 3 2 1 Pitch Pitches were very

    accurate with 1 or 2 mistakes

    Pitches were mostly accurate, with 3 or 4 mistakes

    Pitches were inaccurate, with 5 or more mistakes

    Rhythm The beat is secure, and rhythms accurate, with 1 or 2

    The beat is secure, and rhythms accurate, with 3 or 4

    Beat was unsteady and/or rhythms were sporatic, with 5 or

  • mistakes mistakes more mistakes Solfege The solfege is

    applied correctly The solfege is mostly correct with 1 or 2 mistakes

    The student did not sing with solfege, or 5 or more mistakes were made.

    Comments/ total score

    Journal Elements

    4 3 2 1 0

    Content Answers use the proper terminology discussed in class.

    Answers use some of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers use little of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers are irrelevant to class discussion

    No journal entry completed

    Coherency Student’s response is directly in line with the prompt

    Student’s response strayed from the prompt in places, but returned to topic

    Student’s response is frequently off topic of the prompt

    Student’s response is irrelevant to the subject of the prompt

    No journal entry completed

    Creativity Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts throughout

    Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts through most of the writing.

    Journal entry shows some creativity and unique thought, but little effort was displayed

    Journal entry shows little effort. Creativity and uniqueness are low

    No journal entry completed

    Activity #3 Instructional objective: Students will create a coherent and creative journal using content discussed in class to reflect on their group rehearsal. (Standard 6,7) Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Student
Journals
• A
pencil


    Modalities
addressed:
Aural
and
Kinesthetic
Assessment: Informal assessment will take place by verbal response to guided questions, and class participation Activity:
At
the
end
of
rehearsal
students
will
receive
a
note
card
with
a
prompt:
Evaluate
your
singing.
Note
three
things
that
you
did
well
today,
three
things
the
group
did
well
today,
one
thing
that
you
can
improve
on,
and
one
thing
the
group
can
improve
on.
The
students
will
use
the
space
on
the
card
to
respond
to
the
prompt
and
then
leave
the
card
in
a
designated
area
at
the
front
of
the
room
on
their
way
out
of
class.




  • 
Assessment: The students will be graded by the following rubric: Journal Elements

    4 3 2 1 0

    Content Answers use the proper terminology discussed in class.

    Answers use some of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers use little of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers are irrelevant to class discussion

    No journal entry completed

    Coherency Student’s response is directly in line with the prompt

    Student’s response strayed from the prompt in places, but returned to topic

    Student’s response is frequently off topic of the prompt

    Student’s response is irrelevant to the subject of the prompt

    No journal entry completed

    Creativity Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts throughout

    Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts through most of the writing.

    Journal entry shows some creativity and unique thought, but little effort was displayed

    Journal entry shows little effort. Creativity and uniqueness are low

    No journal entry completed

    Activity #4 Instructional objective: By the end of this lesson, at least 85% of the class will accurately:

    • Show
the
phrasing
of
the
piece
using
body
motion
• Aurally
identify
the
phrase
structure
of
the
piece

(Standards
5,6)


    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
• The
sheet
music
and
a
pencil
• Computer
with
internet
access
and
projector
to
show
youtube
video
of
Weihnachten


    performance
• The
room
will
need
to
be
set
up
with
plenty
of
space
for
movement.
• On
the
board
will
first
be
written
the
letter
A



    Modalities
addressed:
Visual,
Aural
and
Kinesthetic
Activity:
Students
will
stand
in
a
circle
around
the
room.
We
will
start
by
‘marching’
clockwise
around
the
room.
When
we
stop,
a
student
will
give
a
suggestion
for
another
motion
(note
that
the
motions
must
represent
a
steady
beat).
We
will
then
listen
to
a
recording
of
the
piece
(the
Youtube
video,
which
also
displays
the
notated
music
as
the
choir
sings).
As
we
listen,
we
will
begin
marching
around
the
room.
When
a
new
musical
idea
is
introduced,
we
will
stop
and
do
the
second
motion
(and
we
will
add
the
letter
B
to
the
board).
We
will
stop
the
motion
and
have
students
listen,
and
state
whether
they
think
the
next
musical
idea
is
the
same
or
different.
(We
will
write
the
letter
B
on
the
board
again
as
it
is
identified.)
We
will
then
do
the
same
for
the
last
idea
(adding
the
final
A
to
the
board
as
well).
When
this
has
been
done,
we
will
listen
to
the
piece
start
to
finish,
performing
the
motions
that
accompany
each
of
the
ideas.
Once
the
activity


  • is
complete,
we
will
identify
the
form
as
ABBA
(Ternery)
and
students
will
write
this
into
their
music.

Assessment: Informal assessment will occur throughout the lesson, emphasizing the correct body motion as related to phrase identification. 


    Activity #5 Instructional objective: Students
will
compose
and
perform
a
warm‐up
to
demonstrate
their
knowledge
of
the
harmonies
of
the
piece.
(Standards
1,3,5,6)
Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Blank
notation
paper
and
a
pencil
for
each
group
• A
K
Q
J
will
be
written
on
the
board
before
class
• Each
group
will
have
a
copy
of
just
their
section
of
the
score.


    Modalities
addressed:
Visual,
Aural
and
Kinesthetic
Activity:
Students
will
be
given
a
playing
card
as
they
enter
the
room
(Ace,
King,
Queen
or
Jack).

They
will
then
go
to
the
board
and
write
their
name
under
the
indicated
card
name
(A,K,Q,
orJ)
and
place
their
cards
in
a
pile
on
the
piano
on
their
way
to
their
seats.
Students
will
be
divided
into
four
groups
as
follows:
Aces
are
the
first
A
section,
Kings
are
the
first
B
section,
Queens
are
the
second
B
section,
and
Jacks
are
the
final
A
section.
The
students
will
have
a
copy
of
the
song
with
only
their
selected
section
printed.
They
will
then
be
asked
to
compose
on
their
blank
notation
paper
a
warm‐up
using
the
chords
(but
not
necessarily
the
rhythms)
from
their
section.
(If
unsure,
they
may
ask
for
the
teacher’s
assistance,
as
the
teacher
will
be
monitoring
the
room).
They
will
perform
these
for
the
class,
and
submit
both
their
composition
and
their
groups
section
score
to
the
teacher.





Assessment: Points will be given based on a checklist: Did
the
students
correctly
identify
the
chords
of
their
selection?



    Yes/No


    Did
the
students
compose
a
warm‐up
using
the
notes
provided
in
their
section?

    Yes/No


    Did
the
student
accurately
perform
their
warm‐up
for
the
class?

    Yes/No

  • Activity #6 Instructional objective: By
the
end
of
this
activity
students
will



    • Create
a
Pinterest
board
detailing
information
about
the
composer
of
the
piece
(including
biographical
information,
historical
events
from
the
early
Romantic
period,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten).


    • Teach
their
peers
about
the
composer,
based
on
their
findings.

o During
this,
the
students
being
taught
must
record
notes
in
their
journals.


    (Standards
6,7,8,9)
Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Journals
• Computers
with
internet
access


    Modalities
addressed:
Visual
and
Tactile
Activity:

Students
will
each
create
a
Pinterest
board.
These
boards
must
contain
several
pins
covering
the
background
of
the
piece,
including:
biographical
information
about
Mendelssohnn,
historical
events
of
the
early
Romantic
period
that
may
have
impacted
the
music,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten.)
When
boards
are
complete,
the
students
will
be
sorted
into
pairs,
the
students
will
then
teach
their
partner
their
information
(including
why
they
chose
that
particular
information.)
The
student
being
taught
should
record
the
information
(including
his
or
her
partner’s
rationale)
into
his
or
her
journal.

Assessment: Teacher will check all boards for inclusion of each topic, and journals for coherent rationale behind each pin.

    Activity #7 1. Instructional objective: Students
will
compose
a
new
rhythm
based
on
the
text
of
the


    piece
(Standard
4)


    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:



    • Rhythm
worksheet
• Writing
utensil
• The
sheet
music


    Modalities
addressed:
visual
and
tactile
Activity:
Students
will
be
given
the
following
worksheet


    Name_____________________

  • I. Pick one stanza of this piece (one set of four lines). You will be composing a new rhythm for this stanza.

    Stanza Chosen:

    II. Break the words apart syllabically (sei-ne Ge-rech-tig-keit). This will allow you to better create your rhythmic line.

    • Line 1: __________________________________________________________________

    • Line 2: __________________________________________________________________

    • Line 3: __________________________________________________________________

    • Line 4: __________________________________________________________________

    Use these rhythmic bars (no staff, just a line) to write out the rhythmic line. Each vertical line represents a bar line. This piece must remain in 4/4, but you can take liberties with how it will be rhythmically represented.

    |-------------------------|----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    |-------------------------| ----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    |-------------------------|----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    Assessment: Student worksheets will be graded based on the following checklist:

    Did the student identify the stanza used?

    Yes/No

    Did the student break apart the syllables of the words in their indicated lines?

    Yes/No

    Did the student identify the new rhythm?

    Yes/No

  • Activity #8 Complete the webquest in class

  • Weihnachten (#1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79) Composer: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix

    Voicing: SSAATTBB

    Style: Sacred

    Genre: Motet

    Language: German

    Instruments: A Cappella

    License: CPDL (www.cpdl.org)

    Published: Mendelssohn ’s Werke (1874-1877)

  • Student Handbook For Weihnachten (#1 of Sechs Spruche, Op 79)

    By Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847)

    Created by Becca Cline

    National Standards:

    Standard
1:
Singing,
alone
and
with
others,
a
varied
repertoire
of
music.
Standard
2:
Performing
on
instruments,
alone
and
with
others,
a
varied
repertoire
of
music.
Standard
3:
Improvising
melodies,
variations
and
accompaniments.
Standard
4:
Composing
and
arranging
music
within
specific
guidelines.
Standard
5:
Reading
and
notating
music.
Standard
6:
Listening
to,
analyzing,
and
describing
music.
Standard
7:
Evaluating
music
and
music
performances.
Standard
8:
Understand
relationships
between
music,
the
other
arts,
and
disciplines
outside
of
the
arts.
Standard
9:
Understanding
music
in
relation
to
history
and
culture.
 Learning Objectives:

    2. Students
will
demonstrate
their
sight‐singing
ability
by
applying
correct
solfege
syllables
to
their
music
with
4
or
fewer
mistakes.
(Standards
1,5,6)


    3. By the end of this activity, students will complete with 80% accuracy: a. Accurately perform their part using correct solfege syllables, pitches, and

    rhythms.(Standards 1,6) 
b. Students will create a creative and coherent journal entry analyzing their

    experience (using terminology discussed in class.)
(Standards
6,7) 4. Students will create a coherent and creative journal using content discussed in class to

    reflect on their group rehearsal. (Standard 6,7)



5. 



By the end of this lesson, at least 85% of the class will accurately:


    a. Show
the
phrasing
of
the
piece
using
body
motion
b. Aurally
identify
the
phrase
structure
of
the
piece

(Standards
5,6)


    6. 


Students
will
compose
and
perform
a
warm‐up
to
demonstrate
their
knowledge
of
the
harmonies
of
the
piece.
(Standards
1,3,5,6)


    7. 


By
the
end
of
this
activity
students
will

a. Create
a
Pinterest
board
detailing
information
about
the
composer
of
the
piece


    (including
biographical
information,
historical
events
from
the
early
Romantic
period,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten).


    b. Teach
their
peers
about
the
composer,
based
on
their
findings.



  • i. During
this,
the
students
being
taught
must
record
notes
in
their
journals.
(Standards
6,7,8,9)


    ii. journals.
(Standards
6,7,8,9)
8. 

Students
will
compose
a
new
rhythm
based
on
the
text
of
the
piece
(Standard
4)
9. 
Students
will
complete
a
WebQuest
activity,
guiding
them
to
compose
a
new
melody


    based
on
observed
art
and
the
text
of
the
piece.
(Standards
3,4,5,8,9)



    Score Study of Weihnachten 
 Element
 
 Information


    Composer:
Felix
Mendelssohn‐artholdy


    Felix
Mendelssohn
was
born
in
Hamburg,
on
February
3rd,
1809.
In
1843
he
founded
the
Leipzig
Conservatory,
and
was
named
director
of
the
Music
Section
of
the
Academy
of
Arts
in
Berlin
by
King
Frederick
of
Prussia.
And
though
his
schedule
was
quite
full,
it
was
during
this
time
that
he
wrote
the
Ruy
Blas
overture,
stage
music
for
Shakespear’s
“A
Midsummer
Night’s
Dream”
(which
contains
the
now
world‐famous
“Wedding
March”,
and
“The
Scottish
Symphony”,
which
was
the
third
of
five
symphonies
he
wrote
in
his
life
time.


    Style:
 Motet


    Sacred:
 This
is
a
sacred
motet
written
as
part
of
a
set
of
six
pieces
outlining
the
church
calendar.
The
text
is
based
on
Psalm
98


    Key:
 The
key
remains
in
G
Major
throughout


    Texture:
 Eight‐part,
SSAATTBB.
Homophonic
throughout.


    Form:
 Ternery
form
(ABBA)


    Meter:
 The
piece
typically
begins
at
a
moderato
(around
110)
and
gradually
retards
throughout,
until
the
end
approaches
adagio.


    Text:
 The
text
is
based
on
Psalm
98
and
is
one
of
six
pieces
written
to
follow
the
church
calendar.
This
particular
piece
was
written
in
celebration
of
Christmas,
and
was
actually
completed
on
Christmas
day
of
1843.


    Rhythm:
 Mostly
homorhythmic
throughout,
the
song
begins
with
the
women
declaring
“Rejoice,
all
ye
people!”,
and
the
men
come
in
at
the
close
of
that
first
statement
by
the
women
(measure
2),
and
have
their
own
text
and
rhythms
until
measure
6
at
which
time
the
choirs
sing
homorhythmically
until
measure
13.
At
this
point
each
line
has
something
different
until
measure
18
at
which
point
the
parts
come
together
again
rhythmically
until
measure
22,
and
then
the
women
come
together
in
the
pick‐ups
to
measure
29.
The
men
have
their
own
individual
rhythms
until


  • they
all
join
together
in
measure
30.
All
parts
end
in
a
triumphant
fermata.


    Melody:
 The
melody
is
expressed
by
the
women
in
unison
at
the
beginning
and
end
of
the
piece,
otherwise
the
emphasis
lies
in
the
homorhythmic
harmonies.


    Harmony:
 This
piece
is
extremely
harmonically
interesting.
We
begin
in
unison
until
mm
2,
and
then
we
see
several
ii
and
ii7
chords
throughout
in
mm
13,
15,
16,17,
20,
24,
25,
26,
and
28
and
a
V7/ii
going
to
ii
in
mm
7.
There
are
also
a
few
other
secondary
dominants
in
mm
7,
11,
and
22.
The
first
B
section
brings
an
interesting
tonality
that
plays
with
the
resolution
to
tonic,
but
we
don’t
actually
resolve
until
mm
19,
which
also
brings
in
the
second
B
section.
The
second
A
brings
the
return
of
women
in
unison,
but
this
time
the
baritones
and
bases
are
supporting
the
root,
while
the
tenor
twos
add
the
7th
of
our
V
chord,
and
then
resolve
down
as
we
all
reach
our
tonic.
We
then
return
to
V,
with
the
tenor
ones
sustaining
a
G
which
adds
a
brief
9th
to
our
chord,
and
our
baritones
have
the
7th.
We
once
again
resolve
to
tonic,
then
to
a
IV
9
(alto
ones
have
the
7th,
and
soprano
twos
have
the
9th)
and
finally
we
all
arrive
back
at
tonic.


    Phrasing:
 Short,
but
legato
lines,
usually
4‐5
measures
long.
There

are
obvious
places
to
breathe,
but
students
will
absolutely
be
recording
any
markings
I
have
indicated
in
the
score
that
allow
for
good
breath
to
support
the
line.
(One
example
of
this
is
mm
10;
students
will
make
the
second
half
note
of
this
measure
into
a
quarter
note,
and
add
in
a
quarter
rest.
This
will
allow
them
to
cut
off,
end
their
word,
and
begin
the
new
section
cleanly.


    Dynamics:
 This
piece
is
entirely
written
in
forte,
which
is
written
as
a
reminder
at
the
beginning
of
each
new
section,
and
again
for
the
final
halleluja.


    

Text Translation:

    Frohlocket,
ihr
Völker
auf
Erden,
und
preiset
Gott!



    Rejoice,
ye
people
of
the
earth,
and
praise
God!


    Der
Heiland
ist
ershienen,
den
der
Herr
verhißen.



    The
redeemer
is
come,
whom
the
Lord
has
promised.


    Er
hat
seine
Gerechtigkeit
der
Weld
offenbaret.
Hallelujah!


  • He
has
revealed
his
justice
to
the
world.
Hallelujah!


    Text
is
said
to
be
based
on
Psalm
98
which
says:


“Sing
to
the
Lord
a
new
song,


for
he
has
done
marvelous
things;

his
right
hand
and
his
holy
arm





have
worked
salvation
for
him.
2
The
Lord
has
made
his
salvation
known





and
revealed
his
righteousness
to
the
nations.
3
He
has
remembered
his
love





and
his
faithfulness
to
Israel;

all
the
ends
of
the
earth
have
seen
the
salvation
of
our
God.
4
shout
for
joy
to
the
Lord,
all
the
earth,


burst
into
jubilant
song
with
music;
5
make
music
to
the
Lord
with
the
harp,





with
the
harp
and
the
sound
of
singing,
6
with
trumpets
and
the
blast
of
the
ram’s
horn—




shout
for
joy
before
the
Lord,
the
King.
7
Let
the
sea
resound,
and
everything
in
it,





the
world,
and
all
who
live
in
it.
8
Let
the
rivers
clap
their
hands,




let
the
mountains
sing
together
for
joy;
9
let
them
sing
before
the
Lord,





for
he
comes
to
judge
the
earth.

He
will
judge
the
world
in
righteousness





and
the
peoples
with
equity.
“


    Activity #1 Instructional objective: Students
will
demonstrate
their
sight‐singing
ability
by
applying
correct
solfege
syllables
to
their
music
with
4
or
fewer
mistakes.
(Standards
1,5,6)

Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Sheet
music
• Piano
• Pencil


    Activity:
Using
your
knowledge
of
solfege,
you
will
write
the
solfege
for
your
individual
part
into
the
music,
and
then
sing
the
piece
using
the
correct
solfege
syllables.
Using
solfege
is
a
means
to
help
you
sight
read
better,
and
to
help
you
better
understand
your
music!


Below is an example of what an alto’s score should look like after writing in their solfege.

    Assessment: You will turn in your score for me to examine. The assignment should have 4 or

  • fewer mistakes! If you have questions, asks your peers or myself for help!

    Activity #2 Instructional objective: By the end of this activity, students will complete with 80% accuracy:

    • Performance of their part using correct solfege syllables, pitches, and rhythms.(Standards 1,6)

    • Students will create a creative and coherent journal entry analyzing their experience (using terminology discussed in class.)
(Standards
6,7)

    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
• Sheet
music
• Piano
• Journal
and
pencil
• Computer
with
recording
software,
or
some
other
recording
device
• Access
to
internet
to
email
their
recorded
work
to
the
teacher
• If
internet
is
not
available,
a
flash
drive
or
SD
card
with
the
video/audio
recording


    Warmup:
You
will
sing
the
solfege
ladder
again.
This
time
when
you
get
to
the
top,
sopranos
will
stay
on
high
do,
altos
on
la,
tenors
on
fa,
and
basses
and
baritones
on
re,
and
then
move
up
a
half
step
or
down
a
half
step
as
indicated,
and
finally,
resolve
to
tonic.
This
is
a
great
exercise
to
get
you
listening,
and
paying
attention
to
the
other
parts!
Activity:
You
will
video
or
audio
record
yourselves
singing
your
parts
on
the
solfege
syllables
discovered
in
the
last
assignment.
This
activity
will
help
you
develop
individual
ownership
of
your
parts,
and
will
give
you
an
opportunity
to
practice
their
parts
outside
of
class.
;)

You
will
also
listen
to
your
recording
and
journal
about
your
experience,
what
you
had
difficulties
with,
and
what
you
found
helpful
about
the
process
Assessment: The assignment will be graded by the following rubrics: Recording Elements 3 2 1 Pitch Pitches were very

    accurate with 1 or 2 mistakes

    Pitches were mostly accurate, with 3 or 4 mistakes

    Pitches were inaccurate, with 5 or more mistakes

    Rhythm The beat is secure, and rhythms accurate, with 1 or 2 mistakes

    The beat is secure, and rhythms accurate, with 3 or 4 mistakes

    Beat was unsteady and/or rhythms were sporatic, with 5 or more mistakes

    Solfege The solfege is applied correctly

    The solfege is mostly correct with 1 or 2 mistakes

    The student did not sing with solfege, or 5 or more mistakes were made.

    Comments/ total score

  • Journal Elements

    4 3 2 1 0

    Content Answers use the proper terminology discussed in class.

    Answers use some of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers use little of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers are irrelevant to class discussion

    No journal entry completed

    Coherency Student’s response is directly in line with the prompt

    Student’s response strayed from the prompt in places, but returned to topic

    Student’s response is frequently off topic of the prompt

    Student’s response is irrelevant to the subject of the prompt

    No journal entry completed

    Creativity Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts throughout

    Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts through most of the writing.

    Journal entry shows some creativity and unique thought, but little effort was displayed

    Journal entry shows little effort. Creativity and uniqueness are low

    No journal entry completed

    Activity #3 Instructional objective: Students will create a coherent and creative journal using content discussed in class to reflect on their group rehearsal. (Standard 6,7) Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Student
Journals
• A
pencil


    Modalities
addressed:
Aural
and
Kinesthetic
Assessment: Informal assessment will take place by verbal response to guided questions, and class participation Activity:
At
the
end
of
rehearsal
students
will
receive
a
note
card
with
a
prompt:
Evaluate
your
singing.
Note
three
things
that
you
did
well
today,
three
things
the
group
did
well
today,
one
thing
that
you
can
improve
on,
and
one
thing
the
group
can
improve
on.
The
students
will
use
the
space
on
the
card
to
respond
to
the
prompt
and
then
leave
the
card
in
a
designated
area
at
the
front
of
the
room
on
their
way
out
of
class.



Assessment: The students will be graded by the following rubric: Journal Elements

    4 3 2 1 0

    Content Answers use the proper terminology discussed in class.

    Answers use some of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers use little of the terminology discussed in class

    Answers are irrelevant to class discussion

    No journal entry completed

  • Coherency Student’s response is directly in line with the prompt

    Student’s response strayed from the prompt in places, but returned to topic

    Student’s response is frequently off topic of the prompt

    Student’s response is irrelevant to the subject of the prompt

    No journal entry completed

    Creativity Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts throughout

    Journal entry shows strong creativity and unique thoughts through most of the writing.

    Journal entry shows some creativity and unique thought, but little effort was displayed

    Journal entry shows little effort. Creativity and uniqueness are low

    No journal entry completed

    Activity #4 Instructional objective: By the end of this lesson, at least 85% of the class will accurately:

    • Show
the
phrasing
of
the
piece
using
body
motion
• Aurally
identify
the
phrase
structure
of
the
piece

(Standards
5,6)


    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
• The
sheet
music
and
a
pencil
• Computer
with
internet
access
and
projector
to
show
youtube
video
of
Weihnachten


    performance
• The
room
will
need
to
be
set
up
with
plenty
of
space
for
movement.
• On
the
board
will
first
be
written
the
letter
A



    Activity:

You
will
stand
in
a
circle
around
the
room.
We
will
start
by
‘marching’
clockwise
around
the
room.
When
we
stop,
a
student
will
give
a
suggestion
for
another
motion
(note
that
the
motions
must
represent
a
steady
beat).
We
will
then
listen
to
a
recording
of
the
piece
(the
Youtube
video,
which
also
displays
the
notated
music
as
the
choir
sings).
As
we
listen,
we
will
begin
marching
around
the
room.
When
a
new
musical
idea
is
introduced,
we
will
stop
and
do
the
second
motion
(and
we
will
add
the
letter
B
to
the
board).
We
will
stop
the
motion
and
have
students
listen,
and
state
whether
they
think
the
next
musical
idea
is
the
same
or
different.


Assessment: Informal assessment will occur throughout the lesson, emphasizing the correct body motion as related to phrase identification. 


    Activity #5 Instructional objective: Students
will
compose
and
perform
a
warm‐up
to
demonstrate
their
knowledge
of
the
harmonies
of
the
piece.
(Standards
1,3,5,6)
Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:


    • Blank
notation
paper
and
a
pencil
for
each
group


  • • A
K
Q
J
will
be
written
on
the
board
before
class
• Each
group
will
have
a
copy
of
just
their
section
of
the
score.


    
Activity:
You
will
be
given
a
playing
card
as
you
enter
the
room
(Ace,
King,
Queen
or
Jack).

You
will
then
go
to
the
board
and
write
your
name
under
the
indicated
card
name
(A,K,Q,
orJ)
and
place
your
cards
in
a
pile
on
the
piano
on
your
way
to
your
seats.
You
will
be
divided
into
four
groups
as
follows:
Aces
are
the
first
A
section,
Kings
are
the
first
B
section,
Queens
are
the
second
B
section,
and
Jacks
are
the
final
A
section.
You
will
have
a
copy
of
the
song
with
only
your
selected
section
printed.
You
will
then
be
asked
to
compose
on
your
blank
notation
paper
a
warm‐up
using
the
chords
(but
not
necessarily
the
rhythms)
from
your
section.
(If
unsure,
you
may
ask
for
my
assistance,
I
will
be
monitoring
the
room).
You
will
perform
these
for
the
class,
and
submit
both
your
composition
and
the
group’s
section
score
to
the
teacher.





Assessment: Points will be given based on a checklist: Did
the
students
correctly
identify
the
chords
of
their
selection?



    Yes/No


    Did
the
students
compose
a
warm‐up
using
the
notes
provided
in
their
section?

    Yes/No


    Did
the
student
accurately
perform
their
warm‐up
for
the
class?

    Yes/No

    Activity #6 Instructional objective: By
the
end
of
this
activity
students
will



    • Create
a
Pinterest
board
detailing
information
about
the
composer
of
the
piece
(including
biographical
information,
historical
events
from
the
early
Romantic
period,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten).


    • Teach
their
peers
about
the
composer,
based
on
their
findings.

o During
this,
the
students
being
taught
must
record
notes
in
their
journals.


    (Standards
6,7,8,9)


  • Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
• Journals
• Computers
with
internet
access


    Activity:

You
will
each
create
a
Pinterest
board.
These
boards
must
contain
several
pins
covering
the
background
of
the
piece,
including:
biographical
information
about
Mendelssohnn,
historical
events
of
the
early
Romantic
period
that
may
have
impacted
the
music,
information
about
the
Romantic
Era
of
music,
and
videos
or
recordings
of
music
from
Sechs
Spruche
(including
Weihnachten.)
When
boards
are
complete,
you
will
be
sorted
into
pairs,
you
will
then
teach
your
partner
your
information
(including
why
you
chose
that
particular
information.)
The
student
being
taught
should
record
the
information
(including
his
or
her
partner’s
rationale)
into
his
or
her
journal.

Assessment: Teacher will check all boards for inclusion of each topic, and journals for coherent rationale behind each pin.

    Activity #7 1. Instructional objective: Students
will
compose
a
new
rhythm
based
on
the
text
of
the


    piece
(Standard
4)


    Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:
Instructional
materials,
resources,
and
technology
needed:



    • Rhythm
worksheet
• Writing
utensil
• The
sheet
music


    Activity:
Students
will
be
given
the
following
worksheet:


    Name_____________________

    2. Pick one stanza of this piece (one set of four lines). You will be composing a new rhythm for this stanza.

    Stanza Chosen:

    3. Break the words apart syllabically (sei-ne Ge-rech-tig-keit). This will allow you to better create your rhythmic line.

    • Line 1: __________________________________________________________________

    • Line 2: __________________________________________________________________

  • • Line 3: __________________________________________________________________

    • Line 4: __________________________________________________________________

    Use these rhythmic bars (no staff, just a line) to write out the rhythmic line. Each vertical line represents a bar line. This piece must remain in 4/4, but you can take liberties with how it will be rhythmically represented.

    |-------------------------|----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    |-------------------------| ----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    |-------------------------|----------------------------|--------------------------|----------------------------|

    Assessment: Student worksheets will be graded based on the following checklist:

    Did the student identify the stanza used?

    Yes/No

    Did the student break apart the syllables of the words in their indicated lines?

    Yes/No

    Did the student identify the new rhythm?

    Yes/No

    Activity #8 Complete the webquest in class