viewQuick Fix- Editing Checklist Grammar, Spelling, Word Choice Corrections Editing Checklist Examples and Details I have eliminated the vast majority of contractions in

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Quick Fix- Editing Checklist

Grammar, Spelling, Word Choice Corrections

Editing Checklist

Examples and Details

I have eliminated the vast majority of contractions in my paper.

Dont do not

Cant cannot

Theyre, its, isnt, AND ALL OTHERS are gone

I sound sophisticated and am making scholarly word choices.

I dont use vague words like big, small, good, bad, and so forth.

Like such as OR for example

Many several

I dont use absolutes unless theyre actually true

All most or many

No one very few people or a small minority of people

Every time in the majority of cases

When I create a list (three or more items), I use parallelism.

Parallelism is when all the parts of the list are the same part of speech.

Incorrect: In order to fix the achievement gap we must raise the standards of becoming a teacher, require early childhood education, and giving money to the schools.

Correct: In order to fix the achievement gap we must raise the standards of becoming a teacher, require early childhood education, and redistribute money to the schools

Self Editing (aloud)

Choose two or three paragraphs and read them aloud. Is there a good flow? Do they sound completely correct? Am I missing words or word endings? Do I sound formal and scholarly? Do I sound confident? You can partner with someone to read aloud if that helps.

Circle the first word of every sentence.

Within a paragraph, no two sentences should start with the same word. Change them if they do.

No two paragraphs in your essay should start with the same word, change them if they do.

Sentence fragments check the ENTIRE paper

Every sentence must have a subject and a verb.

If Microsoft word is underlining your sentence in squiggly green, its a fragment.

Fragment: International gang violence that affects the whole world.

Fixed: International gang violence affects the whole world.

Commonly confused/misused words

Its vs. its

Its = it is

Its is possessive something belongs to it. Ex: the luggage broke its wheel.

Theyre, there, their

Theyre = they are

There = location. Ex: Over there

Their = possessive, belongs to them. Ex: they lost their passports.

Too, two, to

Too = excess Ex. Too much or too many

Two = 2

To = infinitive of verbs or mark of location Ex: I love to shop. I go to the mall.

Affect (verb) vs. Effect (noun)

Lay/Lie

Choose/Chose

Less/Fewer

Every day/everyday

Than/then

Who/whom

Passive versus active voice each paragraph has more active verbs than passive.

Active: Chaucer wrote the Canterbury Tales. (Person does action)

Passive: The Canterbury Tales were written by Chaucer. (Object receives action)

Transitions between ideas, sentences, evidence and paragraphs are the key to good writing. Use connecting words often and mix up your transitions to guide your reader through your argument.

Paragraph starters First, next, then, In addition

Internal paragraph transitions for example, therefore, however

Use more dynamic transitions by linking between paragraphs

Show addition: Also, furthermore, moreover, indeed, in fact

As examples: for instance, specifically, consider, as an illustration

To elaborate: actually, in other words, ultimately, in short

To compare: likewise, similarly, in the same way

To contrast: on the other hand, despite, conversely, nevertheless

To show cause and effect: hence, accordingly, consequently

Concession: admittedly, granted, naturally, although it is true

Conclusion: as a result, in sum, thus, to summarize, to sum up

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