of 1 /1
1545 ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND. sensational bomb explosion of Saturday last brought this fact into relief, for amongst the doctors regularly attached to the Chamber and the internes of the Hotel-Dieu there could be seen actively ministering to the wants of the wounded such doctor-deputies as MM. Vigier (Minister of Agriculture), Bizarelli (a Qu&aelig;stor of the Chamber), Chassaing, de Mahy, and others. It may truly be said that the medical man can do useful service wherever he may be. ’Dec. 12th. VIENNA. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Influenza in Austria. DURING the last ten days influenza has been prevailing in Vienna as well as in some of the Austrian provinces, especially in Upper Austria and Moravia. The disease itself, however, has assumed a mild form this year, and even the catarrhal symptoms have been less grave than in the previous epidemics, though the fever has been high for one or two days inmost of the cases observed. It will be difficult to obtain trustworthy statistics as to the spread of the epidemic, as influenza is not always notified to the sanitary offices. The Treatment of Deaf-mutism. At the last meeting of the Vienna Society of Physicians an ’, interesting lecture was delivered by Professor Urbantschitsch, who showed five cases of deaf-mutes treated by Herr Iiuhnel, a, teacher of deaf-mutes. Three of these cases were those of acquired and two of congenital deaf-mutism. The procedure consisted of systematic auditory exercises. At first single vowels were repeated, then single consonants, and later whole words and sentences were spoken, and the patients were encouraged to repeat them. The results obtained after very persistent efforts were in some of the cases shown to the Society. Some of these deaf-mutes who had been under this training for two months only could easily reproduce whole sentences spoken to them and could answer questions, but the enunciation was very defective. Two years avo a sugges- tion was made by an anonymous writer in the Wierter Medi- .cinische Bliitter, in an article entitled The Use of the Phono- graph in Medicine," that the phonograph might be brought into use for the benefit of deaf persons. Iodide of Potassium irc Cretinism. At a time when the use of thyroid j juice is being highly cecommended as a useful remedy in cases of cretinism, it will be interesting to note that similar therapeutic results may be obtained in cretinism by the use of iodide of potassium. A communication made by Dr. Schweighofer at the last meeting of the Styrian physicians at Gratz stated that he had succeeded in benefiting a sufferer from cretinism by the internal administration of iodide of potassium. A female <cretin aged twenty-one years with myxcedema and goitre received daily from one to two grammes of the drug from ’February to November of this year. Under this treatment the myx&oelig;dema disappeared and the goitre became smaller. The features of the patient lost their languid character and became more active, and her voice and intelligence im- proved. It was possible now to instruct her in needlework and simple calculations. It was also interesting to observe that during the intervals, when the treatment was stopped on account of catarrhal symptoms produced by the remedy, the myx&oelig;dematous symptoms became aggravated. It may be remarked that the myxcedematous swelling of the nasal enucous membrane also disappeared under the treatment As an Styria there is a large number of cretins it will be possible to test the value of this treatment. Dec. 4th. ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND. AT an ordinary meeting of the Council of the Royal College of Surgeons of Eogland, held on the 14th inst , Mr. J. W. Hulke, F.R.S.. President, in the chair, the minutes of the ordinary Council of Nov. 9th were read and confirmed. The financial arrangements of the two Colleges were fully discussed on the report of the Finance Committee and approved ; but the report was not issued. A report was read from the committee on regular meetings of Fellows of the College. This was approved and adopted with some alterations, and referred to the committee to draw out and submit to the Council regulations to give effect to the amended report. Obituary. WM. KIRKPATRICK McMORDIE, M.D. THE death of Dr. W. K. McMordie, which took place at his brother’s residence near Belfast on Dec. 7th, at the early age of forty-nine years, has been a source of deep regret to all who knew him. Dr. McMordie was educated at Queen’s College, Belfast, where he was a scholar, and in 1868 he graduated M.D. in the late Queen’s University. After prac- tising for some years in Portadown he went to Belfast and decided to devote himself to gynaecology, and with the aid of the late Mr. Benn he established the Samaritan Hospital, where up to about two years ago he was the surgeon in charge, and where he gained considerable experience and reputation. For a time he was examiner in midwifery and in diseases of women in the late Qaeen’s University. About two years since Dr. McMordie began to suffer from an affection of the nervous system, and gradually his constitution seemed to break up. Dr. McMordie was born at Seaforde, county Down, where his father was a Presbyterian clergyman, and his late brother, Dr. Hans McMordie, was well known in the North of Ireland as a distinguished member of the legal profession. The funeral took place on Dec. 9th. ARTHUlt W. EDIS, M.D., F.R.C.P. WE regret to announce-the death of Dr. A. W. Edis, who died last week after having undergone an operation for hernia. Dr. Edis, owing to increased pressure of private practice, had a year ago relinquished his last acting appoint- ment as physician to the Chelsea Hospital for Women. He had previously, in the first place, resigned his post of physician to the British Lying-in Hospital, and in the second place that of obstetric physician to the Middlesex Hospital. At one time he was also assistant physician to the Soho Hospital for Women. This position he did not hold for any lengthened period. Before settling in practice in London as a gynaecologist he attended hospital practice in Paris and Vienna. Dr. Edis was the author of a manual of "Diseases of Women," and contributed various papers to the Obstet- rical and Gynaecological Societies of London. He bad held the posts of secretary of the Obstetrical Society of London, and president of the British Gyn&aelig;cological Society. He was an Honorary Fellow of the Gynaecological Society of Boston, U.S.A. He graduated at the University of London as a Doctor of Medicine in 1868, and in 1879 was elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. Dr. Edis was cremated on Monday last at Working. HABIT IN MAN.-At a meeting of the members of the Victoria Institute, held recently at their rooms in John-street, Adelphi, Dr A. T. Schofield read a paper on the Formation of Habit in Man. After giving a few physiological details necessary to a partially uninstructed audience, he proceeded to discuss the two questions- Is there a mind apart :from the brain ? and, Can mind act on matter ? To the first he replied in the affirma- tive, urging the value a. evidence of knowledge and experience the phenomena of choice, memory, and atten- tion, none of which can be accounted for by sensori-motor reflexes or other forms of nerve action. Witn regard to the second question, which, it will be seen, is really an off-shoot of the first, Dr. A. T. Schofield considered that habits pro- duced absolute nerve fibres in the brain, connecting physi- cally the groups of cells concerned in their performance. Habit is thus physical memory ; memory psychical habit. In conclusion, h6 showed that the leading advantages conferred by habit were economy of force, speed, accuracy, ease. formation of character, and skilL

VIENNA

  • Upload
    phamque

  • View
    217

  • Download
    3

Embed Size (px)

Text of VIENNA

Page 1: VIENNA

1545ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND.

sensational bomb explosion of Saturday last brought this factinto relief, for amongst the doctors regularly attached to theChamber and the internes of the Hotel-Dieu there could beseen actively ministering to the wants of the wounded suchdoctor-deputies as MM. Vigier (Minister of Agriculture),Bizarelli (a Qu&aelig;stor of the Chamber), Chassaing, de Mahy,and others. It may truly be said that the medical man cando useful service wherever he may be.

’Dec. 12th. ________

VIENNA.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Influenza in Austria.DURING the last ten days influenza has been prevailing in

Vienna as well as in some of the Austrian provinces, especiallyin Upper Austria and Moravia. The disease itself, however,has assumed a mild form this year, and even the catarrhal

symptoms have been less grave than in the previous epidemics,though the fever has been high for one or two days inmost ofthe cases observed. It will be difficult to obtain trustworthystatistics as to the spread of the epidemic, as influenza is notalways notified to the sanitary offices.

The Treatment of Deaf-mutism.At the last meeting of the Vienna Society of Physicians an ’,

interesting lecture was delivered by Professor Urbantschitsch,who showed five cases of deaf-mutes treated by Herr Iiuhnel,a, teacher of deaf-mutes. Three of these cases were those ofacquired and two of congenital deaf-mutism. The procedureconsisted of systematic auditory exercises. At first singlevowels were repeated, then single consonants, and laterwhole words and sentences were spoken, and the patients wereencouraged to repeat them. The results obtained after verypersistent efforts were in some of the cases shown to theSociety. Some of these deaf-mutes who had been under thistraining for two months only could easily reproduce wholesentences spoken to them and could answer questions, butthe enunciation was very defective. Two years avo a sugges-tion was made by an anonymous writer in the Wierter Medi-.cinische Bliitter, in an article entitled The Use of the Phono-graph in Medicine," that the phonograph might be broughtinto use for the benefit of deaf persons.

Iodide of Potassium irc Cretinism.

At a time when the use of thyroid j juice is being highlycecommended as a useful remedy in cases of cretinism, itwill be interesting to note that similar therapeutic results maybe obtained in cretinism by the use of iodide of potassium.A communication made by Dr. Schweighofer at the last

meeting of the Styrian physicians at Gratz stated thathe had succeeded in benefiting a sufferer from cretinism bythe internal administration of iodide of potassium. A female<cretin aged twenty-one years with myxcedema and goitrereceived daily from one to two grammes of the drug from’February to November of this year. Under this treatment themyx&oelig;dema disappeared and the goitre became smaller. Thefeatures of the patient lost their languid character andbecame more active, and her voice and intelligence im-proved. It was possible now to instruct her in needleworkand simple calculations. It was also interesting to observethat during the intervals, when the treatment was stoppedon account of catarrhal symptoms produced by the remedy,the myx&oelig;dematous symptoms became aggravated. It maybe remarked that the myxcedematous swelling of the nasalenucous membrane also disappeared under the treatment Asan Styria there is a large number of cretins it will be possibleto test the value of this treatment.Dec. 4th.

ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONSOF ENGLAND.

AT an ordinary meeting of the Council of the RoyalCollege of Surgeons of Eogland, held on the 14th inst , Mr.J. W. Hulke, F.R.S.. President, in the chair, the minutes ofthe ordinary Council of Nov. 9th were read and confirmed.The financial arrangements of the two Colleges were fully

discussed on the report of the Finance Committee and ‘

approved ; but the report was not issued.’ A report was read from the committee on regular meetingsof Fellows of the College. This was approved and adoptedwith some alterations, and referred to the committee to drawout and submit to the Council regulations to give effect tothe amended report.

Obituary.WM. KIRKPATRICK McMORDIE, M.D.

THE death of Dr. W. K. McMordie, which took place athis brother’s residence near Belfast on Dec. 7th, at the earlyage of forty-nine years, has been a source of deep regret toall who knew him. Dr. McMordie was educated at Queen’sCollege, Belfast, where he was a scholar, and in 1868 he

graduated M.D. in the late Queen’s University. After prac-tising for some years in Portadown he went to Belfast anddecided to devote himself to gynaecology, and with the aidof the late Mr. Benn he established the Samaritan Hospital,where up to about two years ago he was the surgeon in

charge, and where he gained considerable experience andreputation. For a time he was examiner in midwifery and indiseases of women in the late Qaeen’s University. About two

years since Dr. McMordie began to suffer from an affectionof the nervous system, and gradually his constitution seemedto break up. Dr. McMordie was born at Seaforde, countyDown, where his father was a Presbyterian clergyman, andhis late brother, Dr. Hans McMordie, was well known in theNorth of Ireland as a distinguished member of the legalprofession. The funeral took place on Dec. 9th.

ARTHUlt W. EDIS, M.D., F.R.C.P.WE regret to announce-the death of Dr. A. W. Edis, who

died last week after having undergone an operation forhernia. Dr. Edis, owing to increased pressure of privatepractice, had a year ago relinquished his last acting appoint-ment as physician to the Chelsea Hospital for Women. Hehad previously, in the first place, resigned his post of

physician to the British Lying-in Hospital, and in the secondplace that of obstetric physician to the Middlesex Hospital.At one time he was also assistant physician to the SohoHospital for Women. This position he did not hold for anylengthened period. Before settling in practice in London asa gynaecologist he attended hospital practice in Paris andVienna. Dr. Edis was the author of a manual of "Diseasesof Women," and contributed various papers to the Obstet-rical and Gynaecological Societies of London. He bad heldthe posts of secretary of the Obstetrical Society of London,and president of the British Gyn&aelig;cological Society. He wasan Honorary Fellow of the Gynaecological Society of Boston,U.S.A. He graduated at the University of London as aDoctor of Medicine in 1868, and in 1879 was elected a Fellowof the Royal College of Physicians. Dr. Edis was crematedon Monday last at Working.

HABIT IN MAN.-At a meeting of the membersof the Victoria Institute, held recently at their rooms inJohn-street, Adelphi, Dr A. T. Schofield read a paperon the Formation of Habit in Man. After giving a fewphysiological details necessary to a partially uninstructedaudience, he proceeded to discuss the two questions-Is there a mind apart :from the brain ? and, Can mindact on matter ? To the first he replied in the affirma-tive, urging the value a. evidence of knowledge andexperience the phenomena of choice, memory, and atten-tion, none of which can be accounted for by sensori-motorreflexes or other forms of nerve action. Witn regard to thesecond question, which, it will be seen, is really an off-shootof the first, Dr. A. T. Schofield considered that habits pro-duced absolute nerve fibres in the brain, connecting physi-cally the groups of cells concerned in their performance.Habit is thus physical memory ; memory psychical habit. Inconclusion, h6 showed that the leading advantages conferredby habit were economy of force, speed, accuracy, ease.formation of character, and skilL