Vademecum Eng

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Vademecum in lingua inglese

Text of Vademecum Eng

  • VADEMECUM FOR THE TOURIST OF THE THIRD MILLENNIUM

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    Overlooking the Adriatic Sea in the centre of Italy, withslightly more than a million and a half inhabitants spreadamong its five provinces of Ancona, the regional seat,Pesaro and Urbino, Macerata, Fermo and Ascoli Piceno,with just one in four of its municipalities containing more thanfive thousand residents, the Marche, which has always beenItalys Gateway to the East, is the countrys only region witha plural name. Featuring the mountains of the Apenninechain, which gently slope towards the sea along parallel val-leys, the region is set apart by its rare beauty and noteworthyfigures such as Giacomo Leopardi, Raphael, Giovan BattistaPergolesi, Gioachino Rossini, Gaspare Spontini, FatherMatteo Ricci and Frederick II, all of whom were born here.

    This guidebook is meant to acquaint tourists of the thirdmillennium with the most important features of our terri-tory, convincing them to come and visit Marche.

    Discovering the Marche means taking a path in search ofbeauty; discovering the Marche means getting to know aland of excellence, close at hand and just waiting to beenjoyed. Discovering the Marche means discovering aregion where both culture and the environment are verymuch a part of the Made in Marche brand.

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    MARCHE Italys Land of Infinite Discovery

    Discovering THE MARCHE REGION

    ...For me the Marche is the East,the Orient, the sun that comesat dawn, the light in Urbinoin Summer...Mario Luzi (Poet, 1914-2005)

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    On one side the Apennines,on the other the Adriaticcoast, and in the middle anexpanse of gentle hills atopwhich sit century-old vil-lages protected bymedieval walls: this is theMarche, also called theMarches, the region withthe plural name, borderingto the north with EmiliaRomagna; to the south withthe Abruzzi and Latium; tothe east with the AdriaticSea, and to the west withUmbria and Tuscany. Withan area of 9,366 km2, theMarche is divided into fiveprovinces (Ancona, Pesaroand Urbino, Macerata,Fermo, Ascoli Piceno) with239 municipalities. Knownas Italy in one region, theMarche region containsthree types of territory:mountain, hill and coast.

    THE CLIMATEThe regions climate is asdiversified as the lay of theland is varied. The averagetemperature ranges from10C to 15C, with temper-ature changes of between5 to 13 C. Along the coast,the climate is subcontinen-tal north of Ancona withsharp shifts in temperaturebetween the seasons: sum-mers are hot but rarelyhumid, thanks to thebreezes and the cool airfrom the hills set back fromthe sea, while winters arecold, with the rains typical ofthe season. Due to theMonte Conero promontory,the climate south of Anconais subcoastal, presentingincreasingly Mediterraneanfeatures further south, inthe direction of the Rivieradelle Palme. The best peri-

    od for beach tourism is Julyand August. The climate inthe inland areas is harsh inwinter, making it advisableto visit villages, parks andother sites in those areas inSpring and Autumn. Sum-mers in the mountain areasare cool, and the Wintersare rather brisk, with snow-fall that allows enthusiaststo take to skiing andengage in other wintersports.

    MOUNTAINSAND PASSES More than 90,000 acres ofMarche, almost 10% of thetotal regional territory, areprotected. There are 2national parks (MontiSibillini and Gran Sassoplus Monti della Laga), 4regional parks (MonteConero, Sasso Simone e

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    GEOGRAPHY

  • Simoncello, Monte SanBartolo and Gola dellaRossa plus Frasassi), 6nature reserves (Abbadiadi Fiastra, Montagna diTorricchio, Ripa Bianca,Sentina, Gola del Furlo andMonte San Vicino plusMonte Canfaito), more than100 protected plant andflower areas, 15 stateforests, and over 60 envi-ronmental education cen-tres. The forests still con-tain deer and wolves. Birdsof note include the goldeneagle, the lanner falcon, thechough and the eagle owl.The regions mountainsinclude: the Montefeltrochain, the Catria chain, theSan Vicino chain and theSibillini chain. Listed fromNorth to South, the mainpeaks are: Carpegna(1,415 m), Nerone (1,526m), Petrano (1,091 m),

    Acuto (1,668 m), Catria(1,702 m), Pietralata (889m), Paganuccio (976 m),San Vicino (1,486 m), Bove(2,169 m), Priora (2,334 m),Sibilla (2,175 m) andVettore (2,476 m).The highest mountain in theMarche is Vettore (2,476m); the lowest is the sub-Apennine Monte Conero(572 m), the only portion ofrocky coastline betweenTrieste and Gargano, divi-ding the Adriatic shore inexactly two portions. Ap-proaching from the North,this break is introduced byFocara, which faces out tosea and was once conside-red a very dangerous pas-sage (the name Focarawould appear to derive fromthe fires that were lit on thehill to warn ships). Theroads that connect theMarche with the neighbou-

    ring regions are routedthrough the Apennine pas-ses of Bocca Trabaria(Urbino-Arezzo), BoccaSerriola (Fano-Citt diCastello), Passo dellaScheggia (Fano-Perugia),Colle di Fossato (Fabriano-Foligno), Passo di Colle-fiorito (Macerata-Foligno),Forca Canapine (AscoliPiceno-Norcia).

    THE GENTLE HILLSThe hilly zone, whichaccounts for two-thirds ofthe territory of the Marche,is where the regions natu-ral features and man-madeworks blend together best.The gentle hills that flowtowards the coast likewaves offer the eye-catch-ing patchwork of colourscreated by the differentcrops. The orchards andcornfields that cloak thesloping sides of the hillscause the landscape tochange from season to sea-son. The rural appearanceof the hills of the Marche isa result of tenant farmingand the planting of multiplecrops, now replaced byintensive, specialized plant-ing. The main crops are stillwheat, grapes and olives,while marked growth hasbeen recorded in agro-food

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    products of certified quality,including nineteen differ-ent wines: 15 RegisteredDesignation of Origin(DOC) and 4 GuaranteedDesignation of Origin(DOCG). Many venerablevillas and landed estatehouses have preserved thearchitecture of the tenantfarming system and arenow agrotourism establish-ments where visitors canspend holidays or stop topurchase organic productsor taste the traditional dish-es of the Marche cuisine.No fewer than 18 villagesare listed among the MostBeautiful Towns in Italy,and 17 sites have beenawarded the Orange Flag,the prestigious bannergiven by the Italian TouringClub to towns whosepreservation of their culturaland environmental her-itage, along with their hospi-

    tality and wine and foodofferings, prove especiallyoutstanding. The tools usedby the sharecroppers arekept as reminders of thepast in museums of peas-ant culture. The bestknown include the museumin Senigallia, named afterthe great economic histori-an Sergio Anselmi, Mon-tefiore dellAso, Morro dAl-ba, Pieve Torina, Sasso-ferrato and the Birocciomuseum in Filottrano.

    THE COAST From Gabicce Mare to SanBenedetto del Tronto, theforms and colours of thecoastal landscape are con-stantly changing. The whitecliffs facing onto the AdriaticSea alternate with the deepgreen of the hills, spottedwith the venerable villagesand the ochre hue of thelong beaches. The coast,

    made up of fluvial depositsof sand and clay, runs alongin two straight and almostperfectly flat portions divid-ed by the Monte Coneropromontory. Some beachesare protected from erosionby breakwaters. There are180 kilometers of coast-line and 26 seasideresorts that face onto theAdriatic, together with thesea port of Ancona and 9tourist ports. 16 Blue FlagAwards certify the highquality of the waters andthe related services, whichoffer visitors a full range ofbeaches made of fine sand,gravel or rock, reefs andpalms. Many of the coastalvillages present an uppervillage, protected by thewalls of a castle perchedon a hill which was the ini-tial settlement, while themarina, a flat district run-ning along the shore, was

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  • only established later as aresidential and businessarea. In some of the sea-side towns, museums ofthe sea have been opened,such as the WashingtonPatrignani Museum inPesaro and the PicenoMussel Museum in CupraMarittima. Today, San Be-nedetto del Tronto has amuseum complex with fourdifferent sections: the FishMarket houses, theMuseum of Amphorae, theFish Museum and theMuseum of the MarineCivilization of the Marche,while the Palazzo BicePiacentini, in the old districtof the upper village, holdsthe Picture Gallery of theSea. Any number of sportscan be practiced along theMarche coast, includingwindsurfing, waterskiing,sailing, diving, kitesurfing,swimming and beach vol-leyball.

    THE MAGIC OF THEWATER. THE RIVERSAND VALLEYS, THECAVES OF FRASASSIAND THE GORGES The region features aseries of harmonious hillsbounded by numerouswaterways that run parallelto each other, almost all ofthem flowing into theAdriatic, with the exceptionof the springs of the Nera,located near the Sibillinimountains. The regionsmain rivers are the Conca,the Foglia, the Metauro -with its tributary theCandigliano - the Cesano,the Misa, the Esino, theMusone, the Potenza, theChienti, the Tenna, the Asoand the Tronto. Water land-scapes have marked theCossignano and Castigna-no areas, where the rainwater has carved charac-teristic gullies from thesandstone escarpments. Anumber of rivers include

    waterfalls and rapids thathave created spectacularravines and gorges in thesurrounding territory, suchas the Furlo gorge, an areadeclared a National NatureReserve in the vicinity ofAcqualagna, and theBurano gorge in Cantiano,both found along the ViaFlaminia in the Province ofPesaro and Urbino. Rivershave