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129 APPOINTMENTS.-VACANCIES. say that he had been able to adopt, to a very large extent at all events, the recommendations of the Commis- sion. He desired to pay a tribute of gratitude on behalf of the Government and the House of Commons to the Commission for the splendid work which it had done. There were no diseases which had done more injury to the life of the people and more destroyed their soundness than had venereal diseases. Their consequences were terrible, because these affected the succeeding generation. Nothing was more horrible than to see little children who had inherited venereal disease. He believed that if the recommendations of the Commission were followed con- sistently in the country a measure of relief would be given. The Commission had suggested that there should be facilities for diagnosis and treatment, that these should be available for the whole population, that they should be free of access, and it was recommended that if the work was done through the local authorities 75 per cent. of the cost should be found by the State. The Chancellor of the Exchequer had agreed that that grant should be given. Aa announce- ment was made by him (Mr. Long) to that effect, and schemes were coming into existence. The counties and county boroughs were organising facilities in connexion with institutions. The Local Government Board was issuing an Order, of which he had approved the other day, imposing this duty upon local authorities. The measures which the Board was calling upon them to take were- (1) that there should be laboratory facilities for free diagnosis; (2) that there should be clinics at the general hospitals for treatment; and (3) that there should be a gratuitous supply of the great remedy, salvarsan. He had seen in one of the London hospitals a ward set apart for the treatment of venereal disease, and he earnestly hoped that all the great hospitals in the country would give their immediate aid in this work. He knew that some of those responsible for hospitals entertained a fear lest the importa- tion into their institutions of the treatment of this disease would injure the reputations of the hospitals. It would do nothing of the kind. It was only possible to deal with this fell disease satisfactorily if the provision was universal. If patients had to go long distances in order to get hospital accommodation he was afraid that they would not go, and the remedies would not be available for them. He was quite confident that there was no reason- to fear that by offering facilities for the treatment of this disease any hospital in the country would suffer in credit or in the good opinion of those who supported it. Appeal for Public Coöperation. He invited the cooperation of local authorities, hospital authorities, medical men, and the public generally. He hoped that there might also be cooperation on the part of ministers of religion throughout the country, who could do a great deal to help in this beneficent work. Naturally there was a feature attached to this disease which did not belong to ordinary troubles. The patient did not like it to be known that he or she was suffering from it. Patients wanted to conceal the fact. Therefore, if they were to be dealt with, great care must be taken not only that there was proper provision for their treatment, but that everything that could be done was done to enable them to get it without unnecessary identification. One of the conditions which he had endeavoured to establish in consequence of this was that it should not be considered essential that a person coming to a hospital for treatment should belong to the district which the hospital served. He was requesting that questions should not be asked so as to identify the patients outside with the terrible misfortune that had overtaken them. It was desired to cure them and to eradicate this horrible disease. It could be done. If the Government received the assistance of people of all classes he believed that the time was not very far distant when this disease might be added to those the permanent ill-effects of which had been eradicated by satisfactory treatment. Sanatoriums. Although there was a shortage of medical men there were to-day 290 sanatoriums and hospitals and 11,743 beds which had been provided for the treatment of tuberculosis in England. There had also been 359 dispensaries provided, and there was to-day sufficient accommodation for our present demands. All soldiers and sailors suffering from tuberculosis could be provided for by those institutions. Most of these men were insured persons, and arrangements in their case were made through the Insurance Committees. But there were many soldiers and sailors who were not insured, and for them arrangements were made by the Local Government Board through the local authorities. There were also special arrangements for the treatment of officers at the King Edward VII. Sanatorium at Midhurst. The Board was not allowing its normal work in connexion with public health to fall behind, although it was embarking on no new fields of enterprise. It was impossible to exaggerate the importance of life-saving work, and of protecting women and children from the mortality which followed from pre- ventable diseases. Some of those diseases, if they were not actually traceable to, were undoubtedly aided and abetted by, overcrowding, insanitary conditions in the homes, and by many of those social evils which had existed through so many generations and of which he was sorry to say the solution was not yet in sight. The Board had done its best to maintain the sanitary services. On the whole the record which he was able to present was not unsatisfactory. Tribute to the Medical Profession. After the war there were many problems which would present themselves for immediate solution-the housing of the people, public works, and further health provision. The Government had set up a Reconstruction Committee, and all these problems were under careful survey and examination. The nation must realise that the health of the people was a matter of first consideration. In some respects there was great room for improvement. Throughout the last year or two there had been an immense amount of voluntary work on the part of people of all classes. He desired to pay a special tribute to medical men throughout the country. Insurance work had thrown upon them an immense burden of work. A very large number of them had joined the Royal Army Medical Corps. That diminished the number avail- able for work at home. Cheerfully and bravely had these men done their work. Let anyone examine the diary of their day’s work and see what they were accomplishing. There was no grumbling. The nation owed a special debt of gratitude to these men, who were labouring in order that the population might be kept in good health. None at home were doing more than they were at present. In the debate which followed general satisfaction was expressed with the statement made by the President of the Local Government Board. Appointments. Successful applicants for racancms, Secretaries of Public Institutions, and others possessing information suitable for this column, are invited to forward to THE LANCET Office, directed to the Sub- Editor, not later than 9 o’clock on the Thursday morning of each week, such information for gratuitous publication. BARROW, G. A., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Lond., has been appointed Anæs- i thetist to the Mancliester Royal Eye Hospital. BROMLEY, L., M.B., M.C. Cantab., F.R.C.S. Eng., Assistant Surgeon to Guy’s Hospital. CONSTABLE, EVELYN A., M.B., B.S. Durh., Surgical Registrar to tae London Temperance H, spital. DORNFORD, A. C., L.S.A. Lond., Certifying Surgeon under the Factory and Workshop Acts for the Faringdon District of the county of Berks. HACKETT, J. A. W., M.B., Ch.B. Edin., Certifying Surgeon under the Factory and Workshop Acts for the Gainsborough District of the county of Lincoln. LLOYD, J. T., M.R.C.S., L.R.C P. Lond., Certifying Surgeon under the Factory and Workshop Acts for the Tregaron District of the county of Cardigan. SCARBOROUGH, HILDA, M.B., B.S. Lond., Assistant Resident Medical Officer at Queen Charlotte’s Lying-in Hospital. THOMPSON, ROBERT BUSHER, M.B., Ch.B. Vict. Manch , Acting Deputy Medical Officer of Health for the Brixham (Devon) Urban Council. WooD-HILL. NELSON, F.R.C.S. Edin., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Lond., Deputy Medical Officer of Health for Tiverton (Devon). Vacancies. For j1wther information regarding each vacancy reference should be made to the advertisement (see Index). When the application of a Belgian medical man would be considered the advertisers are requested to communicate with the Editor. BEDFORD COUNTY HOSPITAL.-House Surgeon, unmarried. Salary as arranged, with board, &c. BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND EYE HOSPITAL, Church-street.-Resident Surgeon. Salary .2200 per annum, with board, &c. BIRMINGHAM UNIVERSITY.-Lecturer in Physiological Department. Salary JE200 per annum. BoLTON INFIRMARY AND DISPENSARY.-Female Second House Surgeon. Salary B200 per annum, with board, &c. BRIGR1.’ON, COUNTY BOROUGH ISOLATION HOSPITAL.-Resident Medical Officer. Salary jE250 per annum, with board, &c. BRISTOL GENERAL HOSPITAL.-House Physician. Salary at rate of .2175 per annum, with board, &c. BRISTOL ROYAL INFIRMARY.-House Surgeons and House Physicians. Salary at rate of £120 per annum, with b-ard, &c. BURY INFIRMARY.-Junior House Surgeon. Salary £150 per annum, with board, &c. CROYDON, COUNTY BOROUGH ISOLATION HOSPITAL.-Resident Medical Officer. Salary at rate of B250 per annum, with board, &c. FREEMASONS’ WAR HOSPITAL.-Resident Medical Officer. Salary as arranged. HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTION AND DISEASES OF THE CHEST, Brompton. -House Physician for six months. Salary 30 guineas. HULL, VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN.-Female House Sur- geon. Salary B1CO per annum, with board, &e.

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129APPOINTMENTS.-VACANCIES.

say that he had been able to adopt, to a very large extentat all events, the recommendations of the Commis-sion. He desired to pay a tribute of gratitude on behalfof the Government and the House of Commons to theCommission for the splendid work which it had done.There were no diseases which had done more injury tothe life of the people and more destroyed their soundnessthan had venereal diseases. Their consequences were

terrible, because these affected the succeeding generation.Nothing was more horrible than to see little children whohad inherited venereal disease. He believed that if therecommendations of the Commission were followed con-sistently in the country a measure of relief would be given.The Commission had suggested that there should befacilities for diagnosis and treatment, that these should beavailable for the whole population, that they should be free ofaccess, and it was recommended that if the work was donethrough the local authorities 75 per cent. of the cost shouldbe found by the State. The Chancellor of the Exchequerhad agreed that that grant should be given. Aa announce-ment was made by him (Mr. Long) to that effect, andschemes were coming into existence. The counties andcounty boroughs were organising facilities in connexionwith institutions. The Local Government Board wasissuing an Order, of which he had approved the other day,imposing this duty upon local authorities. The measureswhich the Board was calling upon them to take were-(1) that there should be laboratory facilities for freediagnosis; (2) that there should be clinics at the generalhospitals for treatment; and (3) that there should bea gratuitous supply of the great remedy, salvarsan.He had seen in one of the London hospitals a ward set apartfor the treatment of venereal disease, and he earnestly hopedthat all the great hospitals in the country would give theirimmediate aid in this work. He knew that some of thoseresponsible for hospitals entertained a fear lest the importa-tion into their institutions of the treatment of this diseasewould injure the reputations of the hospitals. It would donothing of the kind. It was only possible to deal with thisfell disease satisfactorily if the provision was universal.If patients had to go long distances in order to gethospital accommodation he was afraid that they wouldnot go, and the remedies would not be available forthem. He was quite confident that there was no reason-to fear that by offering facilities for the treatment of thisdisease any hospital in the country would suffer in creditor in the good opinion of those who supported it.

Appeal for Public Coöperation.He invited the cooperation of local authorities, hospital

authorities, medical men, and the public generally. Hehoped that there might also be cooperation on the part ofministers of religion throughout the country, who could doa great deal to help in this beneficent work. Naturallythere was a feature attached to this disease which did notbelong to ordinary troubles. The patient did not like it tobe known that he or she was suffering from it. Patientswanted to conceal the fact. Therefore, if they were to bedealt with, great care must be taken not only that there wasproper provision for their treatment, but that everythingthat could be done was done to enable them to get it withoutunnecessary identification. One of the conditions which hehad endeavoured to establish in consequence of this was thatit should not be considered essential that a person coming toa hospital for treatment should belong to the district whichthe hospital served. He was requesting that questions shouldnot be asked so as to identify the patients outside with theterrible misfortune that had overtaken them. It was desiredto cure them and to eradicate this horrible disease. It could bedone. If the Government received the assistance of people ofall classes he believed that the time was not very fardistant when this disease might be added to those thepermanent ill-effects of which had been eradicated bysatisfactory treatment.

Sanatoriums.

Although there was a shortage of medical men there wereto-day 290 sanatoriums and hospitals and 11,743 beds whichhad been provided for the treatment of tuberculosis inEngland. There had also been 359 dispensaries provided,and there was to-day sufficient accommodation for our

present demands. All soldiers and sailors suffering fromtuberculosis could be provided for by those institutions.Most of these men were insured persons, and arrangementsin their case were made through the Insurance Committees.But there were many soldiers and sailors who were notinsured, and for them arrangements were made by the LocalGovernment Board through the local authorities. Therewere also special arrangements for the treatment of officersat the King Edward VII. Sanatorium at Midhurst. TheBoard was not allowing its normal work in connexion withpublic health to fall behind, although it was embarking onno new fields of enterprise. It was impossible to exaggeratethe importance of life-saving work, and of protecting women

and children from the mortality which followed from pre-ventable diseases. Some of those diseases, if they were notactually traceable to, were undoubtedly aided and abetted by,overcrowding, insanitary conditions in the homes, and bymany of those social evils which had existed through somany generations and of which he was sorry to say thesolution was not yet in sight. The Board had done its bestto maintain the sanitary services. On the whole the recordwhich he was able to present was not unsatisfactory.

Tribute to the Medical Profession.After the war there were many problems which would

present themselves for immediate solution-the housing ofthe people, public works, and further health provision. TheGovernment had set up a Reconstruction Committee, and allthese problems were under careful survey and examination.The nation must realise that the health of the peoplewas a matter of first consideration. In some respects therewas great room for improvement. Throughout the last yearor two there had been an immense amount of voluntarywork on the part of people of all classes. He desired to paya special tribute to medical men throughout the country.Insurance work had thrown upon them an immense burdenof work. A very large number of them had joined the RoyalArmy Medical Corps. That diminished the number avail-able for work at home. Cheerfully and bravely had thesemen done their work. Let anyone examine the diary oftheir day’s work and see what they were accomplishing.There was no grumbling. The nation owed a special debt ofgratitude to these men, who were labouring in order that thepopulation might be kept in good health. None at homewere doing more than they were at present.In the debate which followed general satisfaction was

expressed with the statement made by the President of theLocal Government Board.

Appointments.Successful applicants for racancms, Secretaries of Public Institutions,

and others possessing information suitable for this column, are

invited to forward to THE LANCET Office, directed to the Sub-Editor, not later than 9 o’clock on the Thursday morning of eachweek, such information for gratuitous publication.

BARROW, G. A., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Lond., has been appointed Anæs-i thetist to the Mancliester Royal Eye Hospital.BROMLEY, L., M.B., M.C. Cantab., F.R.C.S. Eng., Assistant Surgeon to

Guy’s Hospital.CONSTABLE, EVELYN A., M.B., B.S. Durh., Surgical Registrar to tae

London Temperance H, spital.DORNFORD, A. C., L.S.A. Lond., Certifying Surgeon under the Factory

and Workshop Acts for the Faringdon District of the county ofBerks.

HACKETT, J. A. W., M.B., Ch.B. Edin., Certifying Surgeon under theFactory and Workshop Acts for the Gainsborough District of thecounty of Lincoln.

LLOYD, J. T., M.R.C.S., L.R.C P. Lond., Certifying Surgeon under theFactory and Workshop Acts for the Tregaron District of the countyof Cardigan.

SCARBOROUGH, HILDA, M.B., B.S. Lond., Assistant Resident MedicalOfficer at Queen Charlotte’s Lying-in Hospital.

THOMPSON, ROBERT BUSHER, M.B., Ch.B. Vict. Manch , Acting DeputyMedical Officer of Health for the Brixham (Devon) Urban Council.

WooD-HILL. NELSON, F.R.C.S. Edin., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. Lond., DeputyMedical Officer of Health for Tiverton (Devon).

Vacancies.For j1wther information regarding each vacancy reference should be

made to the advertisement (see Index).When the application of a Belgian medical man would be considered

the advertisers are requested to communicate with the Editor.

BEDFORD COUNTY HOSPITAL.-House Surgeon, unmarried. Salaryas arranged, with board, &c.

BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND EYE HOSPITAL, Church-street.-ResidentSurgeon. Salary .2200 per annum, with board, &c.

BIRMINGHAM UNIVERSITY.-Lecturer in Physiological Department.Salary JE200 per annum.

BoLTON INFIRMARY AND DISPENSARY.-Female Second House Surgeon.Salary B200 per annum, with board, &c.

BRIGR1.’ON, COUNTY BOROUGH ISOLATION HOSPITAL.-Resident MedicalOfficer. Salary jE250 per annum, with board, &c.

BRISTOL GENERAL HOSPITAL.-House Physician. Salary at rate of.2175 per annum, with board, &c.

BRISTOL ROYAL INFIRMARY.-House Surgeons and House Physicians.Salary at rate of £120 per annum, with b-ard, &c.

BURY INFIRMARY.-Junior House Surgeon. Salary £150 per annum,with board, &c.

CROYDON, COUNTY BOROUGH ISOLATION HOSPITAL.-Resident MedicalOfficer. Salary at rate of B250 per annum, with board, &c.

FREEMASONS’ WAR HOSPITAL.-Resident Medical Officer. Salary asarranged.

HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTION AND DISEASES OF THE CHEST, Brompton.’ -House Physician for six months. Salary 30 guineas.

HULL, VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN.-Female House Sur-geon. Salary B1CO per annum, with board, &e.

Page 2: Vacancies

130 NOTES, SHORT COMMENTS, AND ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS.

LEEDS PUBLIC DISPENSARY.-Female Resident Medical Officer. SalaryoE200 per annum, with board, &c.

LONDON TEMPERANCE HOSPITAL, Hampstead-road, N.W.-AssistantResident Medical Officer for six months. Salary at rate of£120 per annum, with board, &e. Also Surgical Registrar. Salaryat rate of 40 guineas per annum.

MANCHESTER NORTHERN HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, Park-place, Cheetham Hill-road.-Female House Surgeon. Salary £120per annum, with board, &c.

NATIONAL HOSPITAL FOR THE PARALYSED AND EPILEPTIC, Queen-square, Bloomsbury, W.C.-Junior House Physician. Salary £100per annum, with board, &c.

OXFORDSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL. -Tuberculosis Officer. Salary 2500per annum.

READING, ROYAL BERKSHIRE HOSPITAL.-House Physician for sixmonths. Salary JB250 per annum, with board, &c.

ST. MARK’S HOSPITAL FOR CANCER, FISTULA, AND OTHER DISEASESOF THE RECTUM, City-road, E.C.-House Surgeon. Salary £150per annum, with board, &c.

ST. PETER’S HOSPITAL FOR STONE, &c., Henrietta-street, CoventGarden. W.C.-Junior House Surgeon for six months. Salary atrate of ;E75 per annum, with board, &c.

SCOTLAND, NAVAL AUXILIARY HOSPITAL.-X Ray Operator andAnaesthetist. Salary as arranged.

YORK CITY.-Temporary Tuberculosis Officer. Salary at rate of £500per annum.

Births, Marriages, and Deaths.BIRTHS.

BOOTH.-On July 3rd, at Upper Richmond-road, S.W., the wife ofCaptain C. H. B. Booth, R.A.M.C.. of a son.

HARVEY.-On July 9th, at Dorset Lodge, Merton Park, the wife ofJoseph Harvey, M.B., of a son.

PERN.-On July 6th, at Botley, Hants, the wife of Alfred S. Pern,M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., of a son.

WRIGHT.-On July 4th, at Aldborough House, Thaxted, Essex, thewife of Thomas Strethill Wright, M.B., temporary Captain,R.A.M.C., of a son.

-

MARRIAGES.BRADBURN-RUBERY. - On July 6th, at St. Michael’s Church,

Rushall, Surgeon Thomas Stratford Bradburn, R.N., to MaryEmmeline, eldest daughter of John Tanner Rubery, J.P., and ofMrs. Rubery, The Limes, Mellish-road, Walsall.

DEVANE-KEOGH.-On June 28th, at the Pro-Cathedral, Dublin, by theRev. R. S. Devane, John Francis Devane, M.D., F.R.C.S., D.P.H.,of Limerick, to Vera, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Keogh,6, Rutland-square, Dublin.

-

DEATHS.TICEHURST.-On July 7th, at Huntbourne, Tenterden, Kent, Augustus

Rowland Ticehurst, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., aged 70 years.N.B.-A fee of 5s. is charged for the Insertion oJ Notices of Births,

Marriages, ctnd Denths.

BOOKS, ETC., RECEIVED.ARNOLD, EDWARD, London.Diagnosis of Nervous Diseases. By Purves Stewart, C.B., M.D.Rdin.,F.R.C.P. Fourth edition. Price 15s. net.

BALE, JOHN, SONS, AND DANIELSSON, London.Child Welfare Annual. Edited by T. N. Kelynack. Price 7s. 6d. net.Maintenance of Health in the Tropics. ByW. J. Simpson, C.M.G.,M.D., F.R.C.P. Second edition. Price 3s. 6d. net.

CLARENDON PRESS, Oxford, London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, New York,Toronto, Melbourne, and Bombay; and MILFORD, HUMPHREY,London, at the Oxford University Press.

Epidemics Resulting from Wars. (Published under the Auspices ofthe Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Division ofEconomics and History.) By Dr. Friedrich Prinzing. Edited byHarald Westergaard, Professor of Political Science in the Universityof Copenhagen. Price 7s. 6d. net.

MACMILLAN AND Co., London and New York.A Laboratory Course in Serum Study. By Hans Zinsser, M.D.,

J. G. Hopkins, M.D., and Reuben Ottenberg, M.D, Price5s. 6d. net.

SAMPSON Low, MARSTON, AND Co.. London.European and other Race Origins. By Herbert Bruce Hannay,

of the Inner Temple, Barrister-at-Law, Advocate of theHigh Court of Judicature, Calcutta. Price 21s. net.

SAUNDERS, W. B., COMPANY, London.Post-mortem Examinations. By W. S. Wadsworth, M.D., Coroner’sPhysician of Philadelphia. Price 25s. net.

M E T E O R O L O G I C A L REA DIN GS.(Taken daily at 8.30 a.m. by Steward’s Instruments.)

THB LANCET Office, July 12th, 1916.

Notes, Short Comments, and Answersto Correspondents.

THE UNIFORM SYSTEM OF HOSPITAL ACCOUNTSA UNIFORM system of keeping accounts has long beenadopted by the principal British hospitals, and by,amongst others, the Governments of Victoria, Queensland,and New Zealand, with several Crown Colonies. It is alsoin force at the principal hospitals in New South Wales,South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania, and SouthAfrica. The system has not yet been adopted in theDominion of Canada, possibly on account of the differenceof currency. By the use of the system expenditure at thevarious hospitals can be compared quite irrespectiveof their size, for by a slight modification of some

of the books used a cottage hospital of 50 beds or

less can adopt the same bookkeeping method as a

large hospital.A new edition of Sir Henry Burdett’s bookl has appeared at

an opportune time, as new hospitals are being establishedall over the land. It is of interest to note that the" Uniform System of Accounts originated at the Queen’sHospital, Birmingham, in 1869 and was devised by theauthor, with the cooperation of the late Mr.William Laundy,a well-known Birmingham accountant. Six years later thesystem was introduced into the Seamen’s Hospital atGreenwich, and was soon after adopted by a few of thelarger hospitals. The Metropolitan Hospital Sunday Fundthen prescribed its use by the hospitals applying forgrants, and a revised form was recommended by theSaturday Fund and King Edward VII.’s Hospital Fund.

’ These three great hospital Funds now propose that theaccounts of all institutions applying for grants from eitherof the three Funds should be audited and certified ascorrect by a chartered or incorporated accountant, whoshould be asked to satisfy himself that all the accountsare prepared and stated in accordance with the revised"Uniform System." Quite recently the Army Council hasissued instructions that all hospitals run by the BritishRed Cross Society or by the Order of St. John should havetheir accounts kept on the " Uniform System." Sir HenryBurdett’s book has therefore become a semi-officialpublication.

WEIHAIWEI HEALTH REPORT.REPORTING on the affairs of Weihaiwei, the naval andmilitary station in the province of Shantung leased toGreat Britain by China in 1898, Sir J. H. Stewart Lockhart,R.C.M.G., the British Commissioner, states that during1915 the health of the territory was very satisfactory.There were no cases of infectious disease reported exceptone case of paratyphoid, from which a visitor suffered, andone case of measles. One case of leprosy occurred, whichwas received by Dr. Fowler into his leper house at HsiaoKan. The administration expresses its indebtedness to himfor having received this patient and to Dr. Wassel, of theAmerican Church Mission, who happened to be payinga visit to Weihaiwei, for having kindly escorted the patientto the Leper Home. In the hospital at Port Edward 7848out-patients and 266 in-patients were treated, making atotal of 8074, as compared with 6770 in 1914 and 2407 in1907. The number of operations performed was 356, asagainst 335 in 1914 and 15 in 1907. In the hospitalat Wêncb’uant’ang 3825 new patients were seen, as

compared with 3923 in 1914. 48 cases were treated as

in-patients and 24 cases were attended at their ownhomes. In November the new hospital on the Islandwas opened, and is a great improvement on the formerbuilding. During the year 4530 vaccinations were per-formed. The number of persons licensed to smoke opiumon medical grounds was 38 (as compared with 27 in 1914),their average age being 62.5 years. The number of con-victions under the Ordinance prohibiting the smoking andimportation of opium was 59. The highest temperaturerecorded at Port Edward during 1915 was 9ge in July, andthe lowest 7° in January; rain or snow fell on 65 days,the total fall for the year being 17’66 inches. AtWench’uant’ang, situated about 13 miles from PortEdward, the highest temperature was 96° in July, and thelowest 16° in January and February; rain or snow fell on84 days, the total fall for the year being 20-29 inches.1 The Uniform System of Accounts for Hospitals and Public Institu-

tions, Orphanages, Missionary Societies, Homes, Coöperations, and allClasses of Institutions, with Special Forms of Account, Complete Sets ofBooks, Certain Suggested Checks upon Expenditure, Forms of Tender,and other Aids to Economy, Together with an Index of Classification(whereby every item of expenditure may be dealt with under identicalheads by every group of institutions). By Sir Henry Burdett, K.C.B.,K.C.V.O. Fourth edition, latest, and up to date. London: The Scientific

Press, Limited. 1916. Pp. 128. Price 5s. net.