Using reflective e-portfolios to promote student learning in the transition to higher education Serena Bufton Ester Ehiyazaryan Sheffield Hallam University,

  • Published on
    21-Dec-2015

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Using reflective e-portfolios to promote student learning in the transition to higher education Serena Bufton Ester Ehiyazaryan Sheffield Hallam University, UK </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> The Context A first-year assessed skills and support module on a large, social science degree. Assessed personal/academic development planning introduced in 2001. Evidence of lack of engagement and general dislocation and alienation amongst students. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> How may e-portfolios help? E-portfolio use may encourage: greater ownership of learning; integrative learning; more reflective, intentional learning; pedagogic innovation. </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Research Project PebblePad e-portfolio tool introduced for first-year students in January 2007. Assessed PDP work carried out using the tool. Analysis of 30 PDPs. Four focus-group meetings, three with students and one with tutors. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Dimensions of Intentional Learning Taking responsibility Taking stock Taking Action </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Taking Responsibility: Challenges Identified by Students Looser external direction and time- management. A less personalised learning context. Unfamiliar academic conventions. Loss of motivation. </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> How can e-portfolio help? Facilitates frequent and speedy on- going support and feedback. Provides an additional channel of communication and a forum for sharing and collaborative work. Becomes a focus for the integration of learning across modules and levels. Encourages ownership of learning. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Taking Stock: Challenges Identified by Students Lack of understanding of feedback provided by tutors: referencing analysis creativity Little experience of assessing own academic strengths and weaknesses. </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> How can e-portfolio help? Provides a window on students thought processes and a space for exploring feedback. Structures the process of self assessment and links it to an evidential base. Encourages students to make links between their feedback and reflections in different modules. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Taking Action: Challenges Identified by Students Feedback not viewed as: actionable a basis for on-going dialogue Students distracted by more mundane (but pressing) challenges such as time management. Students are uncertain about how to evaluate the actions they take. </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> How can e-portfolio help? Provides an additional vehicle for on- going, contextually-based dialogue with other students and tutors. The iterative cycle of work, feedback and reflection and the linking of past, present and future learning encourage a more holistic approach to learning. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Further research We are tracking these students in their second and third years to see what use they make of their e-portfolios. Our central question is whether, and how, e-portfolio use helps students to reflect upon and improve their learning. An additional interest is the pedagogic potential of e-portfolios more generally. </li> </ul>