Upper Mississippi River Recreational Boating

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Upper Mississippi River Recreational Boating. Research Findings. With a focus on Pools 2 - 9. Upper Mississippi River Recreational Boating Research Findings. Stillwater. 2. 3. Shakopee. 4. Red Wing. 5. Location Map. 5A. 6. 7. Winona. 8. 9. IOWA. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Upper Mississippi River Recreational Boating

  • Upper Mississippi River Recreational BoatingWith a focus on Pools 2 - 9 Research Findings

  • Red WingWinonaStillwaterIOWAUpper Mississippi River Recreational Boating Research FindingsLocation MapShakopee243567895A

  • - Since the late 1980s, user conflict and environmental degradation concerns have continued to grow. Over the years, natural resource agencies have conducted numerous field research projects. Study area findings are generally applicable to Pools 2 9.

    Natural Resource Agency Concerns

  • Contributing Research Institutions

    - Minnesota Department of Natural Resources- U S Army Corp of Engineers- National Park Service- Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources- University of Minnesota- United States Geological Survey- Illinois State Water Survey

  • Minnesota Department of Natural ResourcesMississippi River Landscape TeamRecreational Boating Sub-TeamDivisional Participation* Enforcement* Waters* Trails and Waterways* Fisheries* Parks* Ecological Services* Wildlife* Region IV Administration

  • Report Findings.Upper Mississippi River2003 Recreational Boating Survey of Pools 4 9

    over 3,000,000 boater hours over 600,000 boaters over 8,000 lockages mean boat length - 19 feet mean motor size - 117 horsepower* Numbers exclude high use pools 2 and 3.

  • Big boats throw big waves. Shorelines are subject to wave activity of high intensity.Report Findings.

  • The majority of shoreline erosion is attributable to recreational boat waves.- Bank erosion rates of 2 to 3 feet per year are not uncommon.Report Findings.- Recreational boat waves can fragment and reduce island size.- Most accelerated shoreline erosion is found along the main channel where large recreational boats navigate.

  • Report Findings.-The greater the recreational boat use in an area the fewer perennial plant species.

    - The greater the recreational boat use in an area the more bare soil along shoreline.

    -Reduced water clarity near shore is attributable to recreational boat waves eroding and resuspending channel sediments.

    - Turbidity values 10 times the water quality standard are produced in areas subject to high levels of recreational boating activity

  • Report Findings.Recreational boats traveling at less than 5 mph do not cause erosion.

    Recreational boats with a planing hull design when traveling faster than planing speed - create only small waves. Cruisers and other large craft without a planing hull design create bigger waves with increasing speed.

  • Report Findings.Cruisers represent the largest category of recreational boats in Pools 2 4. The number of cruisers has been increasing since 1997.Cruisers

    Chart12

    0.2430.1750.4140.0180.0660.035

    Fishing

    Runabout

    Cruiser

    Pontoon

    Houseboat

    P. Watercraft

    Watercraft Type

    Percent of All Active Watercraft

    Sheet1

    Table II-5. Percent Distribution of Watercrafts, 1989 2001 Mississippi River Pools 2-4

    Recreational Boating Study Year

    Zone1989199119931995199719992001

    2-11.90%2.50%0.80%2.70%2.60%3.70%1.70%

    2-27.00%7.60%4.00%7.20%4.10%6.70%6.40%

    2-33.90%6.20%6.70%5.50%0.20%5.50%4.80%

    2-417.70%16.20%21.20%22.10%40.00%12.30%17.80%

    2-72.60%1.20%1.50%1.50%0.00%1.30%1.60%

    3-12.90%1.90%1.80%2.60%4.30%3.50%3.00%

    3-22.90%3.30%3.30%3.10%0.00%4.00%3.50%

    3-34.60%6.10%5.90%6.00%0.00%7.60%6.10%

    3-428.90%30.10%26.20%25.60%43.40%27.90%26.50%

    4-18.10%5.30%4.00%6.20%1.70%6.40%7.40%

    4-213.00%12.40%14.60%10.60%3.60%11.70%8.90%

    4-36.60%7.30%10.00%7.10%0.20%9.40%12.40%

    %Total100.10%100.10%100.00%100.00%100.10%100.00%100.10%

    Pool

    233.10%33.60%34.20%38.90%46.90%29.50%32.30%

    339.30%41.40%37.10%37.20%47.70%43.00%39.10%

    427.70%25.00%28.70%23.90%5.50%27.50%28.70%

    100.10%100.10%100.00%100.00%100.10%100.00%100.10%

    N=3,6073,0932,0362,2542,5012,7782,889

    F=13131612121112

    N = total watercrafts

    F = # of flights

    Sheet1

    0000000

    0000000

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    1989

    1991

    1993

    1995

    1997

    1999

    2001

    Recreational Boating Study Zones

    Percent of Year Zones

    Distribution of Watercrafts, 1989 - 2001 Mississippi River Pools 2 - 4

    Sheet2

    0000000

    0000000

    0000000

    1989

    1991

    1993

    1995

    1997

    1999

    2001

    River Pool

    Percent of Year Pools

    Distribution of Watercrafts, 1989 - 2001 Mississippi River Pools 2 - 4

    Sheet3

    Table II7. Predominant Active Watercrafts, Mississippi River Pools 2-4, 1999

    TYPEPERCENT OF TOTAL*

    Fishing24.30%

    Runabout17.50%

    Cruiser41.40%

    Pontoon1.80%

    Houseboat6.60%

    P. Watercraft3.50%

    TOTAL*2,118

    * = all activewatercrafts

    Sheet3

    000000

    Fishing

    Runabout

    Cruiser

    Pontoon

    Houseboat

    P. Watercraft

    Watercraft Type

    Percent of All Active Watercraft

  • Report Findings.The more recreational boating activity the more sediment resuspended in the water column.

    - The more recreational boats capable of creating large waves the more shoreline that is eroding.

  • Report Findings. Recreational boat traffic is forecast to increase 20% on the Upper Mississippi River in the next 50 years. Most of the traffic increase will be in Pools 3 and 4 which are already the busiest pools.

  • * Potential Biological Impacts Aquatic plants uprooted or sediments unsuitable for rooting. Plant leaves and stems stripped or broken. Bugs in the sediment dislodged and disturbed Fish spawning habitat disturbed or eliminated. Fish nest disturbed or destroyed. Turtle nesting and basking sites disturbed or destroyed. Large Woody Debris (LWD) destabilized and abraded. Waterfowl and shorebird disturbance and hazing. Burrowing, fur-bearing animal den collapse.Boat Wave Energy* Based on the literature and professional observations.

  • Reduced light penetration limits aquatic plant growth and reproduction. Reduce respiratory function in fish due to abrasion and clogging. Reduced prey capture efficiency by Largemouth Bass and Walleye. Reduced aquatic plant beds resulting in more algal blooms. Reduced filter feeding zooplankton vitality. Reduced Bluegill feeding rates. Greater effects likely occur during particularly vulnerable life stages. Longer the duration the greater the impact.* Potential Biological Impacts* Based on the literature and professional observations.High Turbidity

  • Report Findings.Factors that contribute less than recreational boat waves to shoreline erosion:

    - Wind generated waves in river channels- Ice heaves- Commercial Tow Boats- Normal Flow Velocities- Flood Flow Velocities

  • 1993 DNR PublicationDNR Management Action

  • [DRAFT] 12/30/03 not for distribution

    Mississippi River Landscape Team

    January 2004

    Shoreline and Water Quality Impacts from Recreational Boating on the Mississippi River

  • Upper Mississippi River System Potential Options to Reduce Recreational Boating Impacts.

    Effectiveness of alternative*:

    H = High

    M = Medium

    L = Low

    Alternative

    Comments

    H

    No wake based on boat size

    Could reduce impacts from boats causing the most damaging wakes while not impacting other users; would not be popular with large boat operators; would require local, state, or federal water surface use regulations

    H

    No wake periods based on season and/or water levels

    Would reduce impacts during especially critical times; would require local, state, or federal water surface use regulations

    H

    No wake zones

    Could be used in specific locations or reaches; currently used in some locations; would require local, state, or federal water surface use regulations

    H

    Enforcement add more water patrol officers

    Would help in existing no-wake locations; not a systemic solution unless there are more restrictive local, state, or federal water surface use regulations

    H

    Engineering design more river-friendly boats

    Construct boats/hulls that minimize or eliminate wake; could also be an outcome of more stringent surface water use regulations

    M

    Limit boats based on size, horsepower, and or hull design

    To be effective only smaller boats could be used unless hulls can be designed to reduce wake; would not be popular with large boat operators

    M

    Limit/schedule days and times of use, access points

    Difficult to enforce; would require local, state, or federal surface water use regulations

    M

    Marinas cap or reduce the number and/or length of boat slips

    Would reduce or limit number of large boats causing most impact; address social conflicts with increasing numbers of boats; not popular with marina owners or boat manufacturers

    M

    Restore natural shorelines add sand, re-vegetate

    Could work in specific locations with heavy boat traffic, but not a systemic solution; water level management (drawdowns) or bank restoration projects could help establish vegetation to increase bank stability

    L

    Advertising campaign raise public awareness level

    Has been tried unsuccessfully in the past despite broad media releases and brochures distributed at marinas

    L

    Armor (rock) sho