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645 MARRIAGES. On the 30th ult., at St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s, Poplar, Cornelius Edwin Garman, Surgeon, of Bow-road, Middlesex, to Charlotte, youngest daughter of John Daly, Esq., of Manchester.-No Cards. On the 2nd inst., at Acton, Edward Ballard, M.D., of Islington, to Emme- line, daughter of John Halse, Esq. On the 5th inst., at Leckhampton, near Cheltenham, Arthar Brisley Rye, F.R.C.S.E., of Banbury, to Miss Mary Catherine Noble Liddell. On the 13th inst., at Aston Church, R. P. Walker, Surgeon, of Birmingham, to Emily Louisa, youngest daughter of Thomas Bullock, Esq., of Fern Lodge, Handsworth.-No Cards. DEATHS. On the 16th ult., at Malta, after a few days’ illness, the wife of Dr. John Page Burke, F.R.C.S. On the 24th ult., drowned from the wreck of the " Queen of the South," W. W. Cusworth, M.D., late of Halifax, aged 31. On the 2nd inst., Samuel Barrett, M.D., of Ewell, Surrey. On the 6th inst., at Dublin, J. J. O’Reilly, M.D., of Trim, Co. Meath. On the 7th inst., Wm. Cooke, M.R.C.S.E., of Tunbridge, formerly Surgeon H.E.I.Co.’s Service, aged 70. On the 7th inst., at Wincanton, Somersetshire, after a few hours’ illness, Louisa Maria, the beloved wife of J. J. Luce, M.D. On the 8th inst., at Putney, after a long illness, Isabelle, elder daughter of Henry Davis, M.D. On the 8th inst., at Cleator Lodge, Windermere, Wm. Holme, M.R.C.S., L.S.A.L., aged 53. On the 10th inst., at Adelaide-road, Haverstock hill, Mary, wife of Frederick H. Gervis, Surgeon. Medical Diary of the Week. Monday, May 18. ST. MARK’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 9 A.M. and 1½ P.M. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations,10½ A.M. MBTROPOLITAN FREE HOSPITAL.---Operations, 2 P.M. MEDICAL SOCIETY or LONDON.-8 P.M. Dr. Dick, "On an Endoscope:’- Dr. Oppert, "On a Case of Visceral Syphilis." - Dr. Thorowgood, "On Biliary Calculus." - Dr. Sedgwick, " Oc Laryngeal Cold." - Dr. Day, "On the Spinal Origin of Rheumatism." Tuesday, May 19. ROYAL FpBE HOSPlTAL.-Operations, 9 A.M. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HosPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations,10½ A.M. Guy’s HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.M. WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. NATIONAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITA.L.-Operations, 2 P.M. BovAL INSTITUTION.-3 3 P.M. Dr.lli. Foster, " On the Development of Animals." Wednesday, May 20. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.- Operations, 10 A.M. MIDDLESEX HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.H. ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M. ST. THOMAS’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M. ST. MARY’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1¼ P.H. GREAT NORTHERN HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. UNIVBBSITY COLLEGE HOSPlTAL.-Operations, 2 P.x. LONDON HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, SOOUTHWARK.-Operations, 2 P.M. Thursday, May 2l. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDs.-Operations, 10½ A.M. CENTRAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.M. ST. GEORGE’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.M. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. WEST LONDON HOSPITAL.--Operations, 2 P.M. ROYAL ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. ROYAL INSTITUTION.-3 P.M. Prof. Grant, "On Astronomy." HARVEIAN SOCIETY OF LONDON. - 8 P.M. Friday, May 22. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS-Operations, 10½ A.M. RoYAL FREE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.H. WESTMINSTER OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL.-Operations. 1½ P.M. ROYAL INSTITUTION.-8 P.M. Prof. Odling, "On Effects of the Oxy-l1ydrogen Flame." CLINICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. - 8½ P.M. Papers will be read on " Excision of Elbow;" "Motor Asynergy;" "Action of Digitalis;" " Use of Conium;" and other subjects. Saturday, May 23. ST. TnoMAs’s HOSPITAL.-Operations, 9 ½ A.M. ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations, 10½ A.M. ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M. NIxQ’s COLLEGE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.M. CuARiNG-CRoss HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M. ROYAL INSTITUTION.-3 P.M. Prof. Grant, "On Astronomy." To Correspondents. IMPROPER ADVERTISING. SEVBBAi. correspondents of late have called our attention to a system of advertising which they consider open to very grave objections. In almost every daily paper are to be seen announcements of the number of patients relieved and cured at such an hospital" or at such a dispensary." This system of advertising, it is observed, is adopted only by one or two second- rate hospitals, or by the promoters of "charitable institutions," which in reality are mere private speculations, carried on for the individual profit of their founders. It is argued that, in the absence of detaiis, these announce- ments are calculated to lead to most erroneous conclusions, and to suggest to the charitable that these institutions afford an amount of relief to the sick and the suffering which, if rigidly examined, would be found to be to a certain extent fictitious. At all events it cannot be douhted that the announcements we have alluded to are open to adverse criticism. The practice has sprung up of late from the fierce competition which obtains nmongot practitioners who profess to treat " special" diseases. Before sub- scribing tj hospitals and dispensaries of this class, whose pretensions to public support are paraded so offensively, it is the duty of the charitably disposed to make stringent inquiries into their origin and management. Such inquiries may be safely addressed to a family medical attendant, or to any gentleman of position in the profession. The answers to such inquiries should influence the proposed donors, and they should totally ignore adver- tisements in the public papers, however for ib’e and trustworthy they may appear. Dr. Mackay’s interesting letter has been received, and shall have attention. PRO FESSIONAL ET I QUE T T E. To the Editor of Tnm LANCET. SIR,-Having accepted the apology tendered to me by Mr. Griffith, I had not intended again troubling you with any further correspondence on this subject, liutin the same issue of your journal that contains his amende, there appears a letter from him, supplemented by a testirr.onial as to character trom Dr. Williams, to which I am constrained to reply. It is evident to the most cursory observer that the apology written at a "later" date than the njte contains a direct contradiction of the latter; and as it may be useful to show the value of Dr. Wilhams’s written evidence of character, I enclose copies of a correspondence which took place between us last March. The candour and clearness of his reply will be duly appreciated. Hyères, March, 1869. Mv DEAR SIR,-Will you kindly inform me whether Mr. Griffith Griffith, who IS in practice here, has been a pupil of yours, and whether you have ever requested him to conduct your practice during your absence from London. I am faithfully yours, Dr. Williams. P. CRAS. D?NCAN. Upper Brook-street, April, 1868. DEAR SIR,-Dr. Griffith has been a friend of mine for years. I recom- mended him to go to Hyeres. I have a high opinion of his skill, and have trequently recommended patients to his care with quite satisfactory results. Yours faithfully, Dr. Duncan. C. J. B. WILLIAMS. Comment upon the evasive character of this answer is unnecessary; and if the testimonial is read in the same light, it may afford an insight into its real merit. I again repeat that there is no truth in the statement that I ever called upon a patient of Mr. Griffith’s, or stated him to be a quack; and his remark that he never heard the rumour of his want, of quahtication is the more remarkable, as I intend with this note placing in your hands evidence of the tact that it existed for years before I arrived in Hyeres, and had been the subject of discussion at the tables d’hôte. It is very suggestive that though Mr. Griffith knows the source from which all the information proceeds, he does not there seek an explanation. His denial in his letter that he told me that he had a Scotch degree must be taken for what it is worth. Fortunately I told five gentlemen (whose names I can give) ’’ at the time" of the statement. It possesses the same amount of credence as that made by Dr. Bagshawe in his letter (vide THE LANCET of March 28th), in which he states that Mr. Griffith lit,i received due permission from the authorities to practise, which Mr. Griffith now denies, merely saying that he had shown his diplomas. 1)r. Bagshatve left Cannes upon my taking action against Mr. Griffith and it is not a little singular that upon making inquiries Ht his address, 21. Connaught-squarp, the reply was he had gone away, and left no address. These facts speak for themselves, and the profession will now be able to form a just estimate of the whole affair, which 101,ks very like an attempt to annoy and disgust any respectable man from living or practising in a place w ere no means, however despicable, are left untried to drive him away. My health is still in too unsettled a state for me to further continue this very annoying and contemptible matter. I will simply leave it in the hands ’ of our readers, who will be at no loss to thoroughly understand and appre- ciate our action and motives. Mr. Griffith, on his own statement, has no qualification from any English University which entitles him to call himself an "English physician," nor can all the ingenuity of his friends alter that fact. I am, Sir, faithfully yours, London, May, 1868. P. CEAs. DUNCAN, M.D. Cheltenham.-We have so often expressed our opinions respecting the "fallacy called homoeopathy," that it is scarcely necessary to say that, in the in- terests of the public and the profession, we hold that any attempt to con- nect the "fallacy" with legitimate medicine is a grave and mischievous error. Lector.-Due notice of the time will be given in Tas LANCET.

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645

MARRIAGES.On the 30th ult., at St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s, Poplar, Cornelius Edwin

Garman, Surgeon, of Bow-road, Middlesex, to Charlotte, youngestdaughter of John Daly, Esq., of Manchester.-No Cards.

On the 2nd inst., at Acton, Edward Ballard, M.D., of Islington, to Emme-line, daughter of John Halse, Esq.

On the 5th inst., at Leckhampton, near Cheltenham, Arthar Brisley Rye,F.R.C.S.E., of Banbury, to Miss Mary Catherine Noble Liddell.

On the 13th inst., at Aston Church, R. P. Walker, Surgeon, of Birmingham,to Emily Louisa, youngest daughter of Thomas Bullock, Esq., of FernLodge, Handsworth.-No Cards.

DEATHS.On the 16th ult., at Malta, after a few days’ illness, the wife of Dr. John

Page Burke, F.R.C.S.On the 24th ult., drowned from the wreck of the " Queen of the South," W.

W. Cusworth, M.D., late of Halifax, aged 31.On the 2nd inst., Samuel Barrett, M.D., of Ewell, Surrey.On the 6th inst., at Dublin, J. J. O’Reilly, M.D., of Trim, Co. Meath.On the 7th inst., Wm. Cooke, M.R.C.S.E., of Tunbridge, formerly Surgeon

H.E.I.Co.’s Service, aged 70.On the 7th inst., at Wincanton, Somersetshire, after a few hours’ illness,

Louisa Maria, the beloved wife of J. J. Luce, M.D.On the 8th inst., at Putney, after a long illness, Isabelle, elder daughter of

Henry Davis, M.D.On the 8th inst., at Cleator Lodge, Windermere, Wm. Holme, M.R.C.S.,

L.S.A.L., aged 53.On the 10th inst., at Adelaide-road, Haverstock hill, Mary, wife of Frederick

H. Gervis, Surgeon.

Medical Diary of the Week.Monday, May 18.

ST. MARK’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 9 A.M. and 1½ P.M.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations,10½ A.M.MBTROPOLITAN FREE HOSPITAL.---Operations, 2 P.M.MEDICAL SOCIETY or LONDON.-8 P.M. Dr. Dick, "On an Endoscope:’-

Dr. Oppert, "On a Case of Visceral Syphilis." - Dr. Thorowgood, "OnBiliary Calculus." - Dr. Sedgwick, " Oc Laryngeal Cold." - Dr. Day,"On the Spinal Origin of Rheumatism."

Tuesday, May 19.ROYAL FpBE HOSPlTAL.-Operations, 9 A.M.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HosPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations,10½ A.M.Guy’s HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.M.WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.NATIONAL ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITA.L.-Operations, 2 P.M.BovAL INSTITUTION.-3 3 P.M. Dr.lli. Foster, " On the Development of Animals."

Wednesday, May 20.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.- Operations, 10 A.M.MIDDLESEX HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.H.ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M.ST. THOMAS’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M.ST. MARY’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1¼ P.H.GREAT NORTHERN HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.UNIVBBSITY COLLEGE HOSPlTAL.-Operations, 2 P.x.LONDON HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, SOOUTHWARK.-Operations, 2 P.M.

Thursday, May 2l.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDs.-Operations, 10½ A.M.CENTRAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.M.ST. GEORGE’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1 P.M.UNIVERSITY COLLEGE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.WEST LONDON HOSPITAL.--Operations, 2 P.M.ROYAL ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.ROYAL INSTITUTION.-3 P.M. Prof. Grant, "On Astronomy."HARVEIAN SOCIETY OF LONDON. - 8 P.M.

Friday, May 22.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS-Operations, 10½ A.M.RoYAL FREE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.H.WESTMINSTER OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL.-Operations. 1½ P.M.ROYAL INSTITUTION.-8 P.M. Prof. Odling, "On Effects of the Oxy-l1ydrogen

Flame."CLINICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. - 8½ P.M. Papers will be read on " Excision

of Elbow;" "Motor Asynergy;" "Action of Digitalis;" " Use of Conium;"and other subjects.

Saturday, May 23.ST. TnoMAs’s HOSPITAL.-Operations, 9 ½ A.M.ROYAL LONDON OPHTHALMIC HOSPITAL, MOORFIELDS.-Operations, 10½ A.M.ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL.-Operations, 1½ P.M.NIxQ’s COLLEGE HOSPITAL.-Operations, 14 P.M.CuARiNG-CRoss HOSPITAL.-Operations, 2 P.M.ROYAL INSTITUTION.-3 P.M. Prof. Grant, "On Astronomy."

To Correspondents.IMPROPER ADVERTISING.

SEVBBAi. correspondents of late have called our attention to a system ofadvertising which they consider open to very grave objections. In almost

every daily paper are to be seen announcements of the number of patientsrelieved and cured at such an hospital" or at such a dispensary." This

system of advertising, it is observed, is adopted only by one or two second-rate hospitals, or by the promoters of "charitable institutions," which inreality are mere private speculations, carried on for the individual profit oftheir founders. It is argued that, in the absence of detaiis, these announce-ments are calculated to lead to most erroneous conclusions, and to suggestto the charitable that these institutions afford an amount of relief to thesick and the suffering which, if rigidly examined, would be found to be toa certain extent fictitious. At all events it cannot be douhted that theannouncements we have alluded to are open to adverse criticism. The

practice has sprung up of late from the fierce competition which obtainsnmongot practitioners who profess to treat " special" diseases. Before sub-scribing tj hospitals and dispensaries of this class, whose pretensions topublic support are paraded so offensively, it is the duty of the charitablydisposed to make stringent inquiries into their origin and management.Such inquiries may be safely addressed to a family medical attendant, or toany gentleman of position in the profession. The answers to such inquiriesshould influence the proposed donors, and they should totally ignore adver-tisements in the public papers, however for ib’e and trustworthy they mayappear.

Dr. Mackay’s interesting letter has been received, and shall have attention.

PRO FESSIONAL ET I QUE T T E.To the Editor of Tnm LANCET.

SIR,-Having accepted the apology tendered to me by Mr. Griffith, I hadnot intended again troubling you with any further correspondence on thissubject, liutin the same issue of your journal that contains his amende, thereappears a letter from him, supplemented by a testirr.onial as to charactertrom Dr. Williams, to which I am constrained to reply.

It is evident to the most cursory observer that the apology written at a"later" date than the njte contains a direct contradiction of the latter; andas it may be useful to show the value of Dr. Wilhams’s written evidence ofcharacter, I enclose copies of a correspondence which took place between uslast March. The candour and clearness of his reply will be duly appreciated.

Hyères, March, 1869.Mv DEAR SIR,-Will you kindly inform me whether Mr. Griffith Griffith,

who IS in practice here, has been a pupil of yours, and whether you have everrequested him to conduct your practice during your absence from London.

I am faithfully yours,Dr. Williams. P. CRAS. D?NCAN.

Upper Brook-street, April, 1868.DEAR SIR,-Dr. Griffith has been a friend of mine for years. I recom-

mended him to go to Hyeres. I have a high opinion of his skill, and havetrequently recommended patients to his care with quite satisfactory results.

Yours faithfully,Dr. Duncan. C. J. B. WILLIAMS.

Comment upon the evasive character of this answer is unnecessary; and ifthe testimonial is read in the same light, it may afford an insight into its realmerit.

I again repeat that there is no truth in the statement that I ever calledupon a patient of Mr. Griffith’s, or stated him to be a quack; and hisremark that he never heard the rumour of his want, of quahtication is themore remarkable, as I intend with this note placing in your hands evidenceof the tact that it existed for years before I arrived in Hyeres, and had been

the subject of discussion at the tables d’hôte.

It is very suggestive that though Mr. Griffith knows the source from whichall the information proceeds, he does not there seek an explanation. Hisdenial in his letter that he told me that he had a Scotch degree must betaken for what it is worth. Fortunately I told five gentlemen (whose namesI can give) ’’ at the time" of the statement. It possesses the same amount ofcredence as that made by Dr. Bagshawe in his letter (vide THE LANCET ofMarch 28th), in which he states that Mr. Griffith lit,i received due permissionfrom the authorities to practise, which Mr. Griffith now denies, merely sayingthat he had shown his diplomas.

1)r. Bagshatve left Cannes upon my taking action against Mr. Griffithand it is not a little singular that upon making inquiries Ht his address,21. Connaught-squarp, the reply was he had gone away, and left no address.These facts speak for themselves, and the profession will now be able to

form a just estimate of the whole affair, which 101,ks very like an attempt toannoy and disgust any respectable man from living or practising in a place

w ere no means, however despicable, are left untried to drive him away.My health is still in too unsettled a state for me to further continue thisvery annoying and contemptible matter. I will simply leave it in the hands’ of our readers, who will be at no loss to thoroughly understand and appre-ciate our action and motives. Mr. Griffith, on his own statement, has noqualification from any English University which entitles him to call himselfan "English physician," nor can all the ingenuity of his friends alter thatfact. I am, Sir, faithfully yours,London, May, 1868. P. CEAs. DUNCAN, M.D.

Cheltenham.-We have so often expressed our opinions respecting the "fallacycalled homoeopathy," that it is scarcely necessary to say that, in the in-terests of the public and the profession, we hold that any attempt to con-nect the "fallacy" with legitimate medicine is a grave and mischievouserror.

Lector.-Due notice of the time will be given in Tas LANCET.

646

DISTRICT MEDICAL OFFICER’S SALABT light by the carefully computed life tables of Dr. Farr, that the period be-

IBlington -We can scarcely judg. of this question from the scanty particulars tween 1841 and 1854 indicates a decrease in the value of life as compared with. : .. the two corresponding periods anterior to this date, affords some supportgiven in the paper sent. The medical officers should act together in asking to the belief that some morbific influence is in operation that was not before.to be relieved of dispensing (as we believe they are in Islington), to have One more point I would beg to add. It is that the conclusions drawn fromtheir salaries increased, and to have no new duties imposed on them. the improvement in the sanitary condition of towns recently put under the_ ..,..,’ f .. .. system of water-closet sewerage are open to grave suspicion. IG is the old

L. W. will find an answer to his question in the present number of THE adage concerning the new broom. What will be the condition of these townsLAjrcxT. when the sewers and drains become fouled and imperfect, the hydraulic appa-

Mr. W. Henry must put his questions more definitely. Does he mean with- ratus connected with them worn and out of action, and the rivers polluted,ont examination or residence?

Does he mean with- or the soil around supersaturated by irrigation? Conclusions drawn from

out examination or residence? these recent alterations appear to me full of risk.JVo Stoodent should consult some respectable medical practitioner. In conclusion, do let us realise the philanthropic and patritic importance

of the question. Few of us can have any personal interest to oppose it. Wecan all feel how deeply it affects the welfare, the health, th - life, and the

THE DRY - E A R T H CONSERVANCY. prosperity of the whole community. Under these circums an ies, prejudioesTo the Editor of THE LANCET. should not influence us, but patient investigation and facts S tould alone de-

termine our course. The discussion and the experiences h! ve now reached aSIR,-In THE LANCET of May 2nd you notice a meeting of the Social stage at which the appeal to trial is both appropriate and expedient. If the

Science Association, at which Capt. Fishbourne, R.N., read a paper on the Government would appoint a section of the town, and thetein interdict theabove subject, and towards the conclusion of that notice you observe, " A case throwing any animal matter into the drains and anythiug but animal matterdiaa been made out for giving it a fair trial.’ Also, "Its asserted applica- into earth-closets or tanks, a Company would at once be formed to work suchhas been made out for giving it a fair trial." Also, "Its asserted applica- a district on the dry-earth system, on terms that I doubt not would provebility to London without violation of public decorum is a fair subject for highly beneficial to all the parties concerned.inquiry." I remain, Sir, your obedient servant,

As, against considerable opposition, I was the first to recommend this plan Brook-street, Grosvenor-square, May 9th, 1868. THOS. HAWKSLEY.

for adoption in London, and to publish a scheme for accomplishing it in the M. C. W.- The fee is, under su ch circumstances,stri ctly an onorar .for adoption . London, and to publish a scheme for accomplishing it in the AT. C.W.-The fee is, under such circumstances, strictly an honorarium ;

manner you describe, together with calculations, both sanitary and pecuniary, as its amount was left in the first instance to A. B., " M. C. W." wasshowing its advantages,! I ask you in your ordinary spirit of fairness to give and as its amount was left in the letter requesting an explanation f was th.. opportunity of recording what I said at the meeting you refer to. wrong, we think, in sending the letter requesting an explanation of theme the opportunity of recording what I said at the meeting you refer to. small amount handed to him on the second occasion. It by no means

e

I was struck while listening to the reading of the paper with the complete small amount handed to him on the second occasion. It by no meanscorrespondence in argument and style to an essay on the same subject which follows as a matter of course that the fee for the first attendance should

I published eighteen months ago;* and on rising I expressed my satisfaction be the standard one for future attendances.at Bnding that two men should have arrived at suco precisely similar conclu- Dr. Roberts’s paper on Suppression of Urine" will appear next week.siona without a knowledge of each others labours; for as Capt. Fishbournehad nowhere mentioned my name, I felt sure lie had not read my book. Tothis Capt. h’ishbourne tendered me, as he said, his amende; for that he had THE SICK CLUB B QUESTION.read the book, and made use of it. To the Editor of THE LANCET.

I next observed that the gentlemen who believe from their investigations SIR,-Having for a time undertaken the medical charge of three Benefitand experiraents that the dry-earth conservancy will be found the only effec- Societies in my neighbourhood, permit me, now that the Sick Club questiontual method of dealing with refuse organic matter, and of preventing the is being freely discussed in your columns, to offer the following suggestionsimmense evils to public health, morality, and prosperity, of every other mode to those more immediately concerned:-yet tried, should feel the great obligations they are under to the promoters of 1st. I would recommend that no tradesman, master-man, farmer, or gentle-irrigation for the exhaustive arguments they are preparing in favoar of dry- man’s servant be afforded medical assistance on any pretenee whatever as aearth; for every success they achieve with the washings of sewers tells, Club member. All Sick Clubs were, I believe, originally intended for theà fortiori, for the greater success to be effected with the undiluted material, benefit of the working classes only, and it is nothing short of a great abusein which the ammonia and other most volatile and valuable parts are not of a charity-for this is the only view our counexion with these Societiesdissipated by the agitation, the airiiig, and washing of current air and water affords-that those who are well able to pay for advice should demand ourthrough miles of sewers; by which method of dry conservancy the following services for next to nothing.chief advantages are secured, and which are lost by irrigation namely- 2ndly. If local Clubs, consisting for the most part of agriculturallabourers,(a) The obtaming a concentrated dry manure, portable as flour. (b) The earning but their 10s. or 12s. a week, can pay their doctor 3s. per head perComplete preservation of the atmosphere, the wells, and water-courses from annum, surely the mechanic or journeyman tailor, &c., who earns his 20s, to

pollution, and the consequent prevention of so much preventable disease. 63s. a week, might pay a far higher sum, in proportion to the wages received(c) The economical use of water, whereby the expensive additions to our in the superior Clubs.

, ,

supplies now talked of are rendered quite unnecessary. 3rdly. Three miles in the country, and one and a half in a town, should beTo an objection that the earth system does not utilise the liquid excreta I the maximum distance at which any member should expect to be attended.pointed ouc that the assertion was a complete error; for that 1 had found by It should not be forgotten that Club appointments are for the most part,experiment the employment of double the amount of earth enabled the whole only taken permanently by men either beginning practice, or those practi-of the chamber slops to be thrown into earth-closets or tanks with perfect tioners in a low, poor neighbourhood. It must be difficult, therefore, in bothsuccess, and that the calculations in my published scheme for London con- cases for the doctor to provide himself with a conveyance for long distancestemplated and ii-icluded that object. out of the scanty pay from public appointments.It was also said that earth-closets would be impracticable on account of the 4thly. A fee should be paid either by the Society or the individual himselfimpossibility of insuring the requisite attention to them. My reply to this in all cases where the doctor has to examine a man just entering.was, that indeed such risk is much less than with water-closets. Also, where Lastly. Whether a separate contract will by-and-by be made for the supply,expense of the latter would be found a difficulty, that their use is not essen- of medicines or not, sundry surgical appliances should be provided by alltial; a water-proof tank at the bottom of the house, into which one or man’y Societies.

closet-seats could discharge their recepta, being quite sufficient, the employee In ofl’ering these suggestions, I challenge discussion, not for any benefitappointed to the work keeping the tank properly supplied with dry earth, which I ever expect personally to derive in this direction, but for the sake ofand removing the contents at suitable times, thus making the management our common profession, the dignity of which must be upheld by every meansquite independent of the household. in our power. I am Sir your obedient servantIn reply to a statement that ventilation of sewers by shafts would prevent in our power. I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

GULIELMUS.the transmission of the poisonous gases into houses, I referred to a case ’ GULIELMUS.

which had come under my notice at Shaftesbury, in Dorsetshire, in which ,. ,, . t.. t- - -i) ;< i- Dr. Letheby had been called upon to report. In this case fever had raged in O. V. 0. shall receive an answer to his question if he will send his name andthe town and neighbourhood named during a considerable part of 1861 and address, which he has omitted to enclose.1862. Dr. Letheby found that the drainage had been arranged with an ela- Mr., Haworth acted properly in rejecting the fees offered by the Victoriaborate series of catch-pitq, and that the foul gases emanating from them were Assurauce Company. conveyed into the open air by means of upright pipes carried up against the Assurance Company.sides of houses. The disease had appeared in more than half the houses, and J. D.-The Reports of Mr. Simon; Dr. Parkes’s work on Hygiene.had prostrated an eighth of the whole population. He says: "I saw from itsinsidious course, its prostrating effects, its morbid action on the mucous PROOPER T M E M 0 R I A L F U N n.membranes, and its slightly contagious character, that the fever had but one

.fBOpEBTmjiMOBlALj’UNB.

origin-namely, the putrid miasma from decomposing animal excreta." Also, To the Edttor of THE LANCET."The sewer gases which escaped into the air (from these ventilating shafts), SIR,-As an old Exhibitioner, having spent many years at Epsom, I haveunchanged by any process of oxidation or disinfection, are a prolific source of watched with much interest the discussion on the Propert Memorial Fund.disease." In your impression of last week, the Honorary Secretaries there state thatFrom the late Rector of the parish, a most accurate and philosophical- " circulars have been issued to the old students, but that many have hung

minded man, I have the following report:= There is not the least doubt back:’ I, for one, have not received a circular, and I know ot many whothat the fever cases at Shaftesbury more particularly grouped themselves have been similarly treated, and I should have been totally ignorant of thearound the pipes us-d for ventilating the drains, and that in close neighbour- movement had you not kindly opened your columns for its (iiscussion. Inhood and propinquity to these pipes the cases were not only more numerous, perusing the list of the Committee, I view with no degree of pleasure thebut more virulent. As the clergyman constantly visiting every ca-e, some- names of those who were old playmates with me, whose position at Epsom,times two or three would occur where I did not know ot one of these venti- as no less now in the protessional world, must always be looked upon bylating pipes being near; but on examination I almost invariably found there old Epsomiaas with great delight ; but I am sorry to see that in the list ofwas one or more close at hand." the Committee the Foundation scholars, both past and present, are not

I am particular in giving my au’horities for this instance of the dangers represented. The great end and aim of the noble founder of this institutionfrom ventilating sewers, because one gentleman at the meeting (Mr. Holland) was to provide gratuitous board and education for the sons of the less fortu-used expressions of disbelief unusual among men of education met for ur- tunate members of our profession (hence tae term "Benevolent"), and Iposes ot Scient se discussion. know of many who now owe their present position in life to the educationAn objection was made to the theory of the lowered type of disease being which they have thus received. Tha Exhibitioners must ever feel grateful

due to the tauL ot the breathing air and drinking water having become so that such an institution has been established, endmsed with &uch noblepolluted with bu an excretions since the introduction of water-elosets. The principles ; but I am of opini n that it is for those who have been Lhieflyreasons in support of this iew are to be found in my essay before alluded to, benetited thereby to come forward ; and if they appreciate the many benefitsand it is impossible to repeat them in the space a,lowed for this communica- they have enjoyed, the memory of the late founder’s name will ever be grate-tion. I will only add that the fact noticed by Mr. Rumsey, and brought to fully remembered by them.- &mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash;&mdash; I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

Vide "Matter: its Ministry to Life," &e. Churchill and Son. ’ May, 1868. M.D., M.R.C.S., &C.

647

Society.-It was a saying of Dr. Johnson, that if every difficulty was at firstto be overcome, nothing great would be attempted." In most of the townsof the kingdom difficulties may be found in the way of forming a MedicalSociety; but, as a rule, "the faithful" will far outnumber the faithless. It

is the bounden duty, then, of those who are true to their profession toestablish a Society for the protection of their honour and their interests.No combination is more righteous than that which is formed for the pro-tection of honourable men against the knavery or folly of the dishonourable.

GLYCERINE IN D I A BET E S.

To t7Le Editor of TBB LANCET.SIR,-A case now under my care in the Clinical ward of Guy’s Hospital II

gives the answer to a question contained in your last impression. A corre-spondent asks "any of your readers who have had practical experience in the Imatter whether it is advisable or not to allow a diabetic patient to haveglycerine incorporated with his food."Now, this same question had occurred to myself as one deserving an appeal

Ito direct observation; and in order to be able to speak in a definite mannerupon the subject in the second edition of my work on Diabetes, preparingfor publication, I watched the effect upon the urine produced by the admi-nistration of glycerine in a case of diabetes that is still under observation, inreference to other points, in Guy’s Hospital.The only way of obtaining exact and reliable information in a matter of this

kind is by ascertaining the actual amount of sugar passed. For this purposethe urine has to be collected, measured, and analysed. This was done undermy own supervision in the case in question, the following being the resultsthat were obtained :-The patient is a man of fifty years of age, and has been for some months

the subject of diabetes. On his admission into the hospital, he was placed onthe usual restricted diet, and ordered the bicarbonate of potash with infusionof calumba. Under this treatment for the five days previous to the adminis-tration of glycerine, his urine ranged in quantity between 3 and 3i pints, andthe sugar averaged 1200 grains for the twenty-four hours..

April 16th.-The patient took 6 ounces of glycerine. It was mixed withwhat he drank, and given, in fact, in any way that he felt disposed to take it.The quantity of urine passed for the twenty-four hours was 51. pints; quan-tity of sugar, 3168 grains.17th.-He took 8 ounces of glycerine. Quantity of urine, 5&frac14; pints; quan-

tity of sugar, 2290 grains.18th.-Quantity of glycerine taken, 10 ounces. Quantity of urine passed,

6 pints; quantity of sugar, 2700 grains.19th.-The glycerine was omitted. The quantity of urine fell to 3 pints;

quantity of sugar, 2055 grains.20th.-Quantity of urine, 2--l pints; quantity of sugar, 1584 grains.The patient was for a few days allowed to continue as at first, and then the

glycerine was commenced with again.26th.&mdash;10 ounces of glycerine administered. Quantity of urine, 62 pints;

quantity of sugar, 3744 grains.27th.-Quantity of glycerine the same. Urine, 7 pints; sugar, 4032 grains.28th.-Quantity ot glycerine the same. Urine, 8 pints; sugar, 4608 grains.29th.-Quantity of glycerine the same. Urine, 7i pints; sugar, 4850 grains.The glycerine was now discontinued, and during the two succeeding days

the following results were yielded :-30th.-Quantity of urine, 3 pints; quantity of sugar, 2539 grains.May 1st.-Quantity of urine, 2; pints, quantity of sugar, 1198 grains.Without entering here into the why or the wherefore, it is quite evident

that glycerine leads to an increased elimination of sugar in diabetes. Still,under the large quantity given, there was nothing like the increase that isproduced by the administration of even a moderate quantity of sugar.

I am, Sir, yours, &c.,Grosvenor-street, May l3th, 1868. F. W. PAVY.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,-In reply to Mr. Whitefield Sparke’s inquiry, permit me to state that

I have often allowed patients suffering from diabetes to flavour variousbeverages, such as tea, coffee, &c., with glycerine.

I have never observed any ill-effects from this practice; but, on the con-trary, it generally seems to act !avourably upon the patient’s appetite andhealth, by facilitating digestion, and by mitigating the frequent and some-times almost insuperable loathing for food, which is produced by the totalprohibition of sweats.

I have also occasionally recommended patients to use the glycerine biscuits(into the composition of which glycerine enters in considerable quantity) fordiabetic sufferers. No bad results have followed their employment, the prin-cipal objection to these biscuits being, apparently, the difficulty of keepingthem for any lengthened period.

Care should, of course, be taken that only the best glycerine is used, as thearticle commonly sold is not unfrequently adulterated with glucose, or by theaddition of a syrup of sugar, honey, or treacle, in order to imitate more closelythe peculiar taste of pure glycerine.

I am, Sir, yours obediently,Finsbury-square, May, 1868. ABBOTTS SMITH, M.D.

THE papers of 3fr. Bradley and Mr. W. C. Robinson shall be inserted in anearly number.

Mr. Hugh Brandon will find the information he requires in Dr. Hassall’swork on the "Adulteration of Food."

SQUIRE’S PHOTOGRAPHS OF DISEASES OF THE SKiy.To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SIR,-Some time ago I commenced taking in Alex. B. Squire’s Photographsof Diseases of the Skin. I have now waited a long time for Photograph No. 6of the 3rd series, and the letterpress of Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6 to complete thework. It is now some months since the Photograph No. 5 came out, and mybookseller informs me that Mr. Squire is bringing out some new works, anddoes not intend to complete this edition. Will y. u kindly inform me if suchis the case ? It is a great hardship that the first work should be incompletemerely for the sake of one Photograph and the letterpress of the four last.It is a caution against taking any work in parts. In my case the completenumbers (three series) will have cost me four guineas, and I hear Mr. Squireis bringing out the same work at less than half price. Is this fair ?

Yours obediently,York, May 12th, 1868. INDIGNANT.

0. and W.-The Vaccination Act does not specify that a second penalty canbe inflicted on a parent who had been previously summoned for non-com-pliance with the Act, and who still refuses or neglects to have the operationperformed. Such a case, however, might possibly be reached by the 31stclause of the statute, though upon this point there may be some differenceof opinion.

rnquisitor, (Bolton.)-The handbill of Mr. Douglas is an outrage upon pro-fessional propriety.

Ignoramus.-He is a homoeopathic physician.

EXAMINATION FOR THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS.To the Editor of TaE LANCET.

SIR,-I intended to have presented myself for examination for the mem-bership of the Royal College of Physicians during the latter part of 1867; butinability to spare the time prevented my doing so.Now I find that, without any notice thereof being given, (1) Principles of

Public Health, (2) Psychological Medicine, are added to the list of subjectsin which the candidate will be examined. The former (Principles of PnblicHealth) will not be required from those who commenced their professionaleducation before October lst, 1865; but Psychological Medicine will be re-quired from every one, no matter when his professional education com-menced. This is hardly fair; for if a new subject is introduced into an exa-mination, it certainly should not have a retrospective effect.

If you can call the attention of the authorities to the injustice of the abovesudden alteration in the regulations for the examination for the M.R.C.P,you will oblige one who never saw a lunatic, and who is aMay 6th, 1868. PRACTITIONER OF NINE YEARS* STANDING.

QUALIFIED MIDWIVES.To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SIa.,-Your correspondent, "M.D.," may obtain a list of well-qualifiedmidwives by applying to the Lady Secretary of the Female Medical Society,4y Fitzroy-square, W. Your obedient servant,May 3rd, 1868. JAMES EDMUNDS, M.D.

COMMUNICATIONS, LETTERS, &c., have been received from-Sir H. Thompson }Mr. Henry Lee; Dr. Pavy; Dr. Hawksley; Mr. John Gay; Dr. Marcet;Dr. Letheby; Dr. Tate, Nottingham; Mr. Brown; Mr. Home, Burnham;Mr. Brown; Mr. Lucas; Mr, Blick, Islip; Mr. Quick; Mr. H. T. H. Mead;Dr. Buchanan; Dr. Muspratt; Dr. O’Connor; Mr. Hamilton, Nicaragua;Mr. Daniel; Mr. Sheppard; Mr. Davidson, Blackburn; Mr. Matthews,Durham; Mr. Wade; Mr. Kidd ; Mr. Jones; Dr. Great Rex, Kidsgrove;Mr. Bennett, Worksop; Dr. Wiltshire; Mr. Reed; Dr. Abbotts Smith ;Dr. Robinson, Dublin; Mr. Norris, Tenbury; Mr. Walford; Mr. Colton,Paris ; Messrs. Howell, James, and Co.; Mr. Dobson; Dr. Henry, Liverpool;Mr. Whitlock, Demerara; Dr. Luce, Wincanton; Mr. Thomas; Dr. Lyne.Coventry; Dr. Thomson, Higham Ferrers; Mr. Mostyn; Mr. Hammond;Dr. Mather; Dr. Sanderson; Mr. Hollamby; Mr. Bell; Mr. Hrdwicke,Rotherham; Mr. Hall; Dr. Goldie, Chorlton; Dr. Cooper; Mr. Phillips;Mr. Anniss; Mr. Fry, York Town; Dr. Sealy, Charleville; Dr. Roberts,Manchester; Mr. Wallace, Cork; Mr. East; Mr. James; Mr. Leigh, Don-caster ; Dr. Sandford; Dr. Madden, Dublin; Mr. Roberts; Mr. Anderson.,Inverness; Mr. Walton; Mr. Nichols; Mr. Holt, Jersey; Dr. W. H. Power;Mr. Colman, Axminster; Mr. Seal; Mr. Roland, Milnthorp; Mr. Brandon,Belfast; Mr. Pusey; Dr. Lory Marsh; Mr. Pearse; Mr. Bright, Liverpool;Dr. Meiklem, Glasgow; Dr. Stewart, Belfast; Dr. Rose, Kidderminster;Mr. Harold; Dr. Palmer, Newbury; Dr. Jayakar; Mr. Hill; Mr. Stephen ;Dr. Banning, Gateshead; Mr. H. T. Wood; Mr. Millerchip; Mr. Oxley;Mr. Hughes, Liverpool; Mr. Sargeant; Dr. Williams, Aylesford; Mr. Gell;Dr. Barnes, Carlisle; Mr. H. Knowles; Mrs. Rann, Mr. Barnish, Wigan;Rev. A. Rigg, Chester; Mr. Eilwards; Dr. Calvert; Mr. Reilly; Dr. Hood;Dr. Bradley, Manchester ; Mr. Collier; Mr. Henry, Hatton; Mr. Haworth;The Treasurer of St. Thomas’s Hospital; R. S.; J. C. T.; Clinical Society;M.R.C.S. ; Onward; Society; No Stoodent; Indignant, York; R. D.; M.D.;J. D.; The Pharmaceutical Society; Lector; J. B.; M. C. W.; Ignoramus;The Registrar-General of Edinburgh; H. S.; L. & W.; A Medical Student;C. A. N. ; B. M. D.; Scrutator; Foreign Degree; Inquisitor; &c. &c.

THE Brighton Gazette, the Oswestry Advertiser, the York Star, the As7&ton-under-Lyne News, the Delhi Gazette, the Jamaica Guardian, the SheffieldDaily Telegraph, the Overland Commercial Gazette, the Teignmouth Times,the Islington Gazette, the Brighton Guardian, the Western Gazette andFlying Post, and the Glasgow Herald have been received.