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1 THIRD ANNUAL SCHOOL SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY CONFERENCE AT VANDERBILT Sponsored by Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences & Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center This conference is sponsored in conjunction with our Personnel Preparation Leadership Grant from the US Department of Education (H325D140087) and our grant partnership with the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools. The conference meets the unique professional development needs of school speech-language pathologists. Across two days, participants attend six 90-minute small group sessions and two lunch-time plenary sessions. August 3 and 4, 2015 on the Vanderbilt Peabody Campus Registration 8:00 – 8:30 **** Conference 8:30 – 3:15 ASHA CE credit available, 11 hours REGISTRATION http://vkc.mc.vanderbilt.edu/vkc/ and click on “events” QUESTIONS [email protected] SCHEDULE Monday Tuesday 8:00 – 8:30 Registration Registration 8:30 – 10:00 Session 1 Session 4 10:00 – 10:15 Break Break 10:15 – 11:45 Session 2 Session 5 11:45 – 12:30 Lunch break Lunch Break 12:30 – 1:30 Plenary Session Plenary Session 1:30 – 1:45 Break Break 1:45 – 3:15 Session 3 Session 6 Thank you to our cosponsors! Vanderbilt Kennedy Center and Vanderbilt’s Leadership in Neurodevelopmental Disorders Grant provide assistance in registration and streaming sessions to former training grant trainees. Please plan to park at the Wesley Place Garage (2034 Scarritt Place) or street parking adjacent to the Vanderbilt Peabody Campus. Participants are responsible for their own parking fees. Note that campus police will ticket illegal parking. On the day of the conference, please come to the Commons, a building adjacent to the intersection of 18 th Avenue and Horton Ave. http://www.vanderbilt.edu/traffic_parking/visitor-parking.php

THIRD ANNUAL SCHOOL SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY CONFERENCE ... · THIRD ANNUAL SCHOOL SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY CONFERENCE AT VANDERBILT Sponsored by Department of Hearing and Speech

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  • ! 1

    THIRD ANNUAL SCHOOL SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY

    CONFERENCE AT VANDERBILT

    Sponsored by Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences

    & Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center

    This conference is sponsored in conjunction with our Personnel Preparation Leadership Grant

    from the US Department of Education (H325D140087) and our grant partnership with the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools. The conference meets the unique professional

    development needs of school speech-language pathologists. Across two days, participants attend six 90-minute small group sessions and two lunch-time plenary sessions.

    August 3 and 4, 2015

    on the Vanderbilt Peabody Campus Registration 8:00 – 8:30 **** Conference 8:30 – 3:15

    ASHA CE credit available, 11 hours

    REGISTRATION http://vkc.mc.vanderbilt.edu/vkc/ and click on “events”

    QUESTIONS

    [email protected]

    SCHEDULE Monday Tuesday

    8:00 – 8:30 Registration Registration 8:30 – 10:00 Session 1 Session 4

    10:00 – 10:15 Break Break 10:15 – 11:45 Session 2 Session 5 11:45 – 12:30 Lunch break Lunch Break 12:30 – 1:30 Plenary Session Plenary Session 1:30 – 1:45 Break Break 1:45 – 3:15 Session 3 Session 6

    Thank you to our cosponsors! Vanderbilt Kennedy Center and Vanderbilt’s Leadership in Neurodevelopmental Disorders Grant provide assistance in registration and streaming sessions to former training grant trainees. Please plan to park at the Wesley Place Garage (2034 Scarritt Place) or street parking adjacent to the Vanderbilt Peabody Campus. Participants are responsible for their own parking fees. Note that campus police will ticket illegal parking. On the day of the conference, please come to the Commons, a building adjacent to the intersection of 18th Avenue and Horton Ave.

    http://www.vanderbilt.edu/traffic_parking/visitor-parking.php

  • ! 2

    School SLP Conference at Vanderbilt August 3-4, 2015

    SPEAKER INFORMATION

    Kristen Arthurs, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist serving Metro Nashville Public Schools. She earned a B.S. in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences from Purdue University and an M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from Vanderbilt University. She has a particular interest in preschool speech and language, practicing at the Bordeaux Early Learning Center since its opening in August 2014. JoAnne Berns, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Currey Ingram Academy. She earned a B.S. in Elementary Education and an M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from Vanderbilt. While in her masters program, she was funded on an OSEP Personnel Preparation Grant. She is also a certified K-6 teacher and is trained in S.P.I.R.E® and LiPS® reading programs. Heather Blalock, M.A., CCC-CLP, has spent 20 years working as a Speech-Language Pathologist in Metro Nashville Public Schools. She began working with AAC devices in 1997 and has been part of the Assistive Technology Team for 15 years. Ms. Blalock earned her M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Tennessee. Kathryn Blankenship, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Middle Tennessee State University. She received her B.S. from the University of Houston, M.S. from University of Texas at Dallas and her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. Kathryn has worked clinically for the past 12 years in various clinical settings from private practice to schools to home health with a variety of children and adults with communication disabilities. Her research interests include speech perception and spoken language development in children who use cochlear implants and clinical supervision/training. Sarah Blumberg, Ed.D., BCBA-D is a behavior analyst and educational consultant at Vanderbilt's TRIAD. She provides training and consultation to school-based personnel and is coordinator of TRIAD's school-age services. She has previously worked in school settings as a teacher and consultant, as well as providing direct intervention to individuals with ASD. Matthew Brown, B. A. is currently in his first year of the M.S.-SLP program at Vanderbilt University and is on the voice specialty track. He is a graduate of the University of California Davis, where he studied French, comparative literature, and music. From 2010-2014 he worked in Lille, France as a teacher of English as a foreign language. His clinical interests include motor speech disorders, craniofacial abnormalities, and voice. Danielle Campbell, M.A., CCC-SLP has been practicing as a school-based SLP in MNPS for 13 years. She has been part of the Assistive Technology Team for 7 years. She obtained her M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from Southern Illinois University. Melanie Chambers, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist and has been with the Metro Nashville Public Schools for the past six years. She earned a B.S. in Elementary Education and an M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Memphis. Prior to working for MNPS she was in private practice and worked for WAVES in Williamson County where she evaluated and served children for Tennessee Early Intervention Services. Melanie is also a certified K-8 teacher. Angela Chen, B.A. is in her first year of Vanderbilt University's Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology program. In 2012, she graduated from The College of New Jersey with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology and minors in Spanish and Fine Arts. After graduation, she served as a full-time tutor with Boston Public Schools through City Year, an education-focused nonprofit organization. She decided to return to school in order to learn more about language and literacy and is currently specializing in school speech-language pathology. Working as a tutor at the Kennedy Center Reading Clinic has allowed her to see the intersection between language impairments and literacy and continue defining her role as a future SLP. Sarah Schneck, B.S. is a current graduate student in the M.S.-SLP program at Vanderbilt University. She graduated from Northeastern University with a major in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology and minors in American Sign Language and Psychology. She is currently working on her Master’s thesis in the Child Language and Literacy Lab at Vanderbilt University under Dr. Schuele, and her clinical interests include motor speech disorders, autism, and aphasia. Nikki Davis, Ph.D. is a Research Assistant Professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Special Education at Vanderbilt working as an Educational Consultant on the Vanderbilt Accelerated Academic Achievement Research Center (funded by IES) studying instructional programs for students with the most severe learning disabilities in grades 3 to 5. She obtained her Ph.D. in neuroscience and communication sciences and disorders at the University of Colorado. Emily Dayle Quinn, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist specializing in augmentative and alternative communication. She is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Michael de Riesthal, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences (Vanderbilt University School of Medicine), and Director of Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Hearing and Speech Sciences from Vanderbilt University. His clinical and research interests include the management of neurologic speech, language, and cognitive disorders. Dr. de Riesthal teaches courses on the management of aphasia, motor speech disorders, and traumatic brain injury in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Allison Drost, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist for Williamson County Schools (TN). She earned her Master’s in Speech-Language Pathology from Louisiana State University. For 20 years, Allison has worked in a variety of settings including acute care, long-term care, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, home health, NICU, and private practice. She also served as a clinical supervisor at University of Louisiana at Monroe and has supervised countless CFY-SLPs in multiple settings.

  • ! 3

    Megan Dunn Davison, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor of Linguistics and Communication Disorders at Queens College, CUNY. Her research focuses on the language development and familial factors that may impact the development of early literacy skills, later reading development, and written language abilities in at-risk populations. Jacob Feldman, M.S., CF-SLP is a doctoral student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University and a trainee on OSEP Leadership grant #H325D140087. He is also co-chair of the School SLP Conference at Vanderbilt. He recently graduated from Vanderbilt's MS-SLP program in the School SLP Specialty Track. Rebecca Fischer, Ph.D. is a Professor at Middle Tennessee State University. She received her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. Rebecca has taught in the undergraduate Speech Pathology & Audiology program at Middle Tennessee University for 18 years, as an audiologist and teacher of the hearing impaired. Her research interests include clinical supervision/training and auditory processing disorders. Jamie D. Fisher, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is currently working as a travel Speech-Language Pathologist in school districts, rehabilitation centers, and hospitals across the United States. Her clinical interests include speech, language, and literacy. She has presented at the local, regional, and national level. Jamie's doctoral studies were funded by an OSEP Leadership Grant. Heather Gillum, Ph.D. is currently the Learning Specialist at The Covenant School in Nashville. Her prior research, university teaching, and clinical SLP experience has focused on children with oral language disorders as well as language-based learning disabilities that affect reading and writing. Stephen Groner, B. A., is a graduate student studying Speech-Language Pathology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. In 2014, he graduated from Vanderbilt University with a degree in Human and Organizational Development, which taught him how to identify, understand, and solve problems in organizations and among groups of people. As a person who stutters, he happily bears with the untrue assumptions sometimes made about his disability and seeks opportunities to educate others on the nature of stuttering. His goal in life is to always ask more questions than he answers. Lauren Hampton, M.Ed., BCBA is a doctoral student in Early Childhood Special Education and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. After completing her Master's at Vanderbilt University in 2010, Lauren worked at the Brown Center for Autism, and returned to pursue her doctorate in 2012. Jack Henderson, M.S., CCC-SLP is a person who stutters and a Speech-Language Pathologist in the Robertson County (TN) School District. He received his bachelor and master's degrees from Vanderbilt University. He also is co-director, alongside Dr. Ellen Kelly, of Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center's Summer Camp for Children who Stutter. He resides in Nashville, TN. Magdalene Jacobs, M.A. (Linguistics) is a doctoral student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Her research focuses on the interface between speech perception and phonological development in children with hearing loss, children with dyslexia, and children with specific language impairment. Robin M. Jones, Ph.D., CCC-SLP in an Assistant Professor of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. His primary research interest relate to childhood stuttering, with a focus on emotional (caregiver report, behavioral and psychophysiological) and linguistic contributions to stuttering as well as empirical assessment and treatment of stuttering. Stephanie Jordan is, M.S., CCC-SLP a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist who completed her Master's degree from the University Of California, Northridge. Prior to moving to TN, Stephanie worked as an SLPA for a non-profit clinic in California. For the past 5 years she has worked on several of Dr. Ann Kaiser's projects as an interventionist, parent trainer, and assessor. Ellen M. Kelly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor in Hearing and Speech Sciences and Director of the Stuttering Foundation Program at Vanderbilt. She diagnoses and treats disorders of speech fluency across the lifespan. She engages in clinical practice, consultation, education, and research generation and dissemination. Ellen obtained her Ph.D. from Syracuse University. Hannah Krimm, M.S., CCC-SLP is a doctoral student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Her Master's training was funded on an OSEP Personnel Preparation Grant and she is a trainee on OSEP Leadership grant #H325D140087. Her interests include research methodology and reading and writing development in children with language-based learning disabilities. She is co-chair of the School SLP Conference at Vanderbilt. Sylvia Liang, M.S. is a doctoral student in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Her research has primarily focused on the identification and prevention of children who are at risk of reading and writing difficulties. She also worked with children having neurological disorders in the past. Lorry Liotta-Kleinfeld, Ed.D., OTR/L, BCP is a Professor in the School of Occupational Therapy at Belmont University. She has nine years of teaching experience in higher education and fifteen years of clinical experience as a pediatric occupational therapist. She co-authored Motor Behavior as part of AOTA's Self-Paced Clinical Course in Neuroscience and Occupation: Links to Practice in 1997. Her research interests include the study of treatment techniques that are used to promote function in children with neurological disorders. Whitney Loring, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist at Vanderbilt's TRIAD. She provides training and consultation to school-based personnel and community/medical providers and is coordinator of the Families First Program for parents of children with ASD. Her research focuses on using behavioral strategies to address medical needs in individuals with ASD.

  • ! 4

    Keely McMahan, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute (PBPRI) at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center. Her clinical interests include the management of neurologic speech, language, and cognitive disorders. Keely is one of the primary clinicians at PBPRI working with students who experience cognitive-communicative disorders following traumatic brain injury. Jennifer Muckala, M.A., CCC-SLP is the senior Speech-Language Pathologist at the Vanderbilt Voice Center at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Jennifer was an Adjunct Instructor of Music at Belmont University for ten years and has extensive experience in the evaluation and rehabilitation of a variety of voice disorders. Jane-Ann Myers, M.S. has been a SLP for 21 years, spending the majority of her professional life working in independent schools as both a learning specialist and an administrator. Carolyn Novaleski, M.S. is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. She serves as a research assistant in the Laryngeal Biology Laboratory where her research focuses on voice science and voice disorders. Maureen Sanger, Ph.D. is a pediatric psychologist who has worked with children and adolescents in medical settings for the past 25 years. She conducts neurocognitive evaluations of youths who have had strokes or who have a chronic disease. She also helps school personnel identify appropriate accommodations for children with medical needs. Rae Schaper, M.Ed., is the author of mulitple language-based preschool literacy curriculums. She received her B.A. in Special Education from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, and has a M.Ed. in Early Childhood Education. Her background includes classroom teaching, and college instruction. She currently provides early childhood professional development seminars across the nation. C. Melanie Schuele, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Associate Professor in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on early literacy development and complex syntax acquisition. She is project director for OSEP Leadership Grant #H325D140087. Sarah Schneck, B.S. is a current graduate student in the M.S.-SLP program at Vanderbilt University. She graduated from Northeastern University with a major in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology and minors in American Sign Language and Psychology. She is currently working on her Master’s thesis in the Child Language Lab at Vanderbilt University under Dr. Schuele, and her clinical interests include motor speech disorders, autism, and aphasia. Elizabeth Smith, M.S., CCC-SLP is the clinical coordinator at Middle Tennessee State University. She received her B.S. from MTSU and her M.S. from UT Knoxville. Elizabeth's areas of expertise include clinical administration and supervision, pediatric language intervention, pediatric oral motor and feeding, autism spectrum disorders, preschool and school age children communication assessment and early identification assessment for dyslexia. Janie Sommer, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist in Metro Nashville Public Schools. She earned a B.S. in Spanish and Biology from Olivet Nazarene University and an M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from Vanderbilt. Janie has served as a supervisor to graduate students. While in her masters program, she was funded on an OSEP Personnel Preparation Grant. Suzanne Thompson, M.Ed., BCBA is an Educational Consultant for Kidtalk working across projects as both an interventionist and an assessor. She has a Bachelor's Degree in Communication Disorders, a Master's Degree in Early Childhood Special Education, and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Suzanne has been with Kidtalk since October 2009 and enjoys working in an environment where she is able to directly apply research to the clinic and home settings. Lisa Wallace, M.S., CCC-SLP has worked with children with autism and their families, caregivers, and educators over the past 20 years. She is currently the treatment team coordinator for an NIH-funded grant studying treatment intensity and delivery style in toddlers with autism. She also teaches a course on Autism and Communication at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center. Krystal L. Werfel, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders and director of the Written Language Laboratory at the University of South Carolina. Her research focuses on the influence of spoken language on written language outcomes for children with hearing loss and children with language impairment. Her doctoral studies were funded by an OSEP Leadership Grant and she was funded on an IES research grant for her postdoctoral studies. Courtney Wright, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is a speech language pathologist currently working as a Research Associate in Special Education. Her specializations include early childhood, augmentative and alternative communication, and Down syndrome. Hatun Zengin-Bolatkale, M.A., CCC-SLP is a doctoral student in Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University. Her primary research interests include use of social emotional and cognitive neuroscience methods to investigate developmental stuttering.

  • !SC

    HO

    OL SPEEC

    H-LA

    NG

    UA

    GE PA

    THO

    LOG

    Y C

    ON

    FERENC

    E AT V

    AN

    DERBILT

    AU

    GU

    ST 3-4, 2015 SESSIO

    N IN

    FORM

    ATIO

    N

    !#

    Presenter(s)

    Title Learning O

    bjective(s) A

    bstract Topic

    Time and Location

    1 M

    egan Dunn

    Davison, P

    h.D.,

    CC

    C-S

    LP

    Instructional S

    upport for R

    eading and W

    riting in English

    Language Learners

    1. To describe instructional strategies that support E

    LLs content area know

    ledge in the classroom

    .

    Many students w

    ho are English Language Learners (E

    LLs) reach the m

    iddle grades (4-8) lacking the language and literacy skills required to achieve grade level content know

    ledge. How

    ever, there are few program

    s that are designed specifically for adolescent struggling readers w

    ho are also E

    LLs. This session investigates the features of instruction and scaffolds that facilitate learning for E

    LLs using classroom

    content areas (e.g., oral language development,

    direct vocabulary instruction, reading comprehension, w

    riting).

    ELL, Literacy

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Kennedy C

    enter, 241

    2 Jane-A

    nn Myers,

    M.S

    . S

    LPs, R

    eading A

    ssessments, and

    Finding New

    Friends

    1. Explain reading

    assessment results.

    Speech P

    athologists are uniquely qualified to help children develop the skills necessary for reading. In this session w

    e will

    review the underpinnings of the process of learning to read,

    the skills tapped in both decoding and comprehension, and the

    components of a typical standardized reading assessm

    ent. We

    will outline the skills assessed and reasoning behind choosing

    those skills.

    Literacy, A

    ssessment

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #2 3

    Kathryn

    Blankenship,

    Ph.D

    . R

    ebecca Fischer, P

    h.D.

    Speech

    Perception and

    Language Abilities

    in Children w

    ith H

    earing Loss: P

    ractical A

    pplication

    1. Identify the relationship betw

    een speech perception and language skills in children w

    ith hearing loss. 2. List the contributions of audition, vision, and touch for perception of the speech com

    ponents of m

    anner, place, and voicing. 3. U

    se specific strategies to develop auditory skills w

    ithin the context of speech and language developm

    ent in the school setting.

    Children w

    ith any degree of hearing loss are at risk for having poor speech perception, and, therefore, struggle to develop typical language skills (Jerger, 2007). Y

    et, in order to m

    aximize the developm

    ent of language, speech-language pathologists m

    ust develop auditory skills so that children with

    hearing loss have the opportunity to use the auditory sense m

    odality to comprehend and m

    onitor speech and language production. The purpose of this presentation is to present current inform

    ation regarding the relationship between speech

    perception and language development in children w

    ith hearing loss, detail how

    audition, touch, and vision interface to provide a m

    ore complete com

    posite of speech stimuli, and provide

    practical treatment techniques and strategies to develop

    auditory and language skills in children with hearing loss.

    Hearing Loss

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

    4 Jack H

    enderson, M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    S

    upport Groups

    for Parents of

    Children w

    ho S

    tutter: Case

    Exam

    ple and Feasibility in the P

    ublic Schools

    1. Describe the benefits of

    engaging parents in support of childhood stuttering outside the IE

    P

    meeting room

    and discuss feasibility and logistic challenges inherent in conducting these in the public school setting.

    This session will present a case exam

    ple of a monthly support

    group for parents of students who stutter held in the public

    school system. M

    eeting were led and facilitated by an S

    LP

    employed in the district. B

    enefits and evidence based rationales for creating this group w

    ill be discussed. Video clips

    and/ or transcriptions of the discussions in the meetings w

    ill be presented. Logistical issues related to scheduling, location, and outreach w

    ill be discussed.

    Fluency, P

    arental Involvem

    ent

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons, Tow

    ers C

    onference Room

  • !!

    6!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 5

    Lisa Wallace,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    The AB

    Cs of

    Improving

    Com

    munication in

    Students w

    ith A

    SD

    1. Learners will be able to

    apply the principles of A

    pplied Behavior A

    nalysis in the context of teaching new

    comm

    unication skills to students w

    ith AS

    D

    This session will briefly describe a functional assessm

    ent process S

    LPs can use in school settings to develop goals for

    their students with A

    SD

    . The majority of the session w

    ill focus on using the principles of A

    BA

    to address those com

    munication goals in a school setting.

    AS

    D

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #1 6

    C. M

    elanie S

    chuele, Ph.D

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    Vanderbilt

    Schools S

    LP

    Track Preceptors:

    Mentoring

    Graduate

    Students

    Com

    mitted to

    School S

    LP

    Careers (by

    invitation only)

    1. Describe critical

    experiences that promote

    students' comm

    itment to

    and preparation for a career as a school S

    LP

    This is a special session for FSS

    D and M

    NP

    S S

    LPs w

    ho serve as preceptors for V

    anderbilt Masters S

    LP students.

    Attendance is by invitation only.

    Supervision

    Day 1, S

    ession 1: M

    onday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Library Room

    7 H

    eather Gillum

    , P

    h.D.

    What's Language

    Got To D

    o With It?

    1. Learn strategies for identifying the linguistic underpinnings of classroom

    activities and leveraging this insight to help students w

    ith language-based learning differences.

    This session will focus on the language dem

    ands of specific classroom

    activities for the purposes of language intervention goal-setting, planning supports in the classroom

    , and consideration of accom

    modations and m

    odifications.

    Language D

    ay 1, Session 1:

    Monday, 8:30-

    10:00 A.M

    . H

    obbs, 100A

    8 K

    athryn B

    lankenship, P

    h.D.

    Rebecca Fischer,

    Ph.D

    . E

    lizabeth Sm

    ith, M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    Clinical

    Supervision of

    Student C

    linicians in a S

    chool S

    etting: How

    to M

    ake it Effective

    and Fun

    1.Identify the skills necessary to be an effective clinician. 2.List qualities of a successful clinical supervisor. 3.A

    pply specific strategies that enable student clinicians to attain skills necessary for the school setting. 4.S

    umm

    arize the laws

    applying to practice within

    the school setting.

    Today's school Speech-Language P

    athologist has to have strong analytical/problem

    -solving skills, effective interaction skills for responding to and developing children's utterances, the ability to com

    municate inform

    ation effectively both in w

    ritten and spoken form, and the ability to locate, organize,

    synthesize, as well as critically evaluate the vast accum

    ulating know

    ledge. So the question is: H

    ow do w

    e prepare student clinicians to acquire the necessary skills to be an effective and com

    petent clinician? This presentation will discuss som

    e ways

    to guide, support, and empow

    er students in their journey to becom

    e excellent professionals and clinicians in such a varied and changing field.

    Supervision

    Day 1, S

    ession 2: M

    onday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

    9 K

    rystal Werfel,

    Ph.D

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Em

    ergent Literacy in C

    hildren with

    Hearing Loss

    1. Define em

    ergent literacy and its relation to later literacy achievem

    ent 2. D

    escribe patterns in em

    ergent literacy achievem

    ent in children w

    ith hearing loss 3. Identify w

    ays to increase emergent

    literacy achievement in

    children with hearing loss

    Literacy achievement for children w

    ith hearing loss is notoriously poor. E

    ven children with hearing loss w

    ho use am

    plification and spoken language continue to exhibit deficits in reading and w

    riting. Literacy deficits emerge during the

    preschool years in emergent literacy: oral language,

    phonological awareness, and print know

    ledge. This session w

    ill (a) provide an overview of em

    ergent literacy and its relation to later literacy achievem

    ent, (b) discuss emergent

    literacy achievement deficits in children w

    ith hearing loss, and (b) provide ideas for increasing em

    ergent literacy skills in children w

    ith hearing loss. The session will include hands-on

    practice putting into practice the principles discussed.

    Literacy, H

    earing Loss D

    ay 1, Session 2:

    Monday, 10:15-

    11:45 A.M

    . K

    ennedy Center,

    241

  • !!

    7!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 10

    Heather G

    illum,

    Ph.D

    . For C

    Fs Only: A

    Focus on C

    urriculum and

    Collaboration from

    the First D

    ay

    1. Explain the language

    demands of som

    e typical curricular activities. 2. E

    xplain how learning

    more about the classroom

    curriculum

    can facilitate an S

    LP’s collaborative skills.

    School speech-language pathologists are expected to

    collaborate with other educators in order to provide speech-

    language services that support children’s academic

    achievement and that incorporate curricular m

    aterials. Dr.

    Gillum

    will use her experience as a speech-language

    pathologist and learning specialist to help clinical fellows think

    about how they can be curriculum

    -focused and collaborative in this challenging first year as a school speech-language pathologist.

    CFY

    s D

    ay 1, Session 2:

    Monday, 10:15-

    11:45 A.M

    . H

    obbs, 100A

    11 JoA

    nne Berns,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Janie Som

    mer,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Improving Literacy

    Through Speech-

    Language Therapy

    1. Describe w

    hy it is im

    portant for SLP

    s to address literacy and practical w

    ays to incorporate literacy skills (e.g., reading, w

    riting, spelling) into therapy sessions.

    This session will offer evidence-based strategies for teaching

    reading, writing, and spelling. The im

    portance of addressing these skills in speech-language therapy w

    ill be discussed. P

    resenters will share several real-life exam

    ples of how they

    address literacy in therapy with students in grades K

    -6.

    Literacy D

    ay 1, Session 2:

    Monday, 10:15-

    11:45 A.M

    . C

    omm

    ons M

    ultipurpose Room

    #2

    12 W

    hitney Loring, P

    sy.D.

    Sarah B

    lumberg,

    Ed.D

    ., BC

    BA

    -D

    Teaching P

    ragmatic

    Language Skills to

    Children w

    ith A

    utism S

    pectrum

    Disorders

    1. Understand how

    to use a com

    bination of evidence-based practices to teach pragm

    atic language skills, such as conversation skills, to children w

    ith autism

    spectrum disorders

    In teaching pragmatic language skills to children w

    ith Autism

    S

    pectrum D

    isorders, it is important to use a com

    bination of evidence-based strategies that prom

    ote concrete understanding of these behaviors, paired w

    ith opportunities for repetition and use of reinforcem

    ent. This session will focus on

    how to use a com

    bination of practices, such as visual supports, naturalistic teaching, and discrete trial teaching, to w

    ork on pragmatic language goals.

    AS

    D

    Day 1, S

    ession 2: M

    onday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #1

    13 Lauren H

    . H

    ampton, M

    .Ed.

    BC

    BA

    S

    uzanne Thom

    pson, M.E

    d., B

    CB

    A

    Stephanie Jordan,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Teach-Model-

    Coach-R

    eview: A

    M

    ethod for Training P

    arents in N

    aturalistic Interventions

    1. Describe how

    to incorporate parents into language intervention sessions using research-based adult learning strategies.

    Parents play an im

    portant role in their child's language developm

    ent through the frequency of input, meaningful

    responsiveness, and through social interactions. A recent

    meta-analysis determ

    ined that interventions delivered by both a parent and a clinician w

    ith children with autism

    are more

    effective that interventions delivered by a clinician or parent alone, regardless of dosage. The teach-m

    odel-coach-review

    (TMC

    R) m

    ethod of parent training utilizes adult teaching strategies to support parent learning. In this session, w

    e will

    teach the components of TM

    CR

    , give specific examples using

    a naturalistic language intervention, and discuss measuring

    implem

    entation fidelity in this triadic intervention model.

    AS

    D,

    Parental

    Involvement

    Day 1, S

    ession 2: M

    onday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons, Tow

    ers C

    onference Room

    14 S

    ylvia Liang, M.S

    . Jacob Feldm

    an, M

    .S., C

    F-SLP

    Back to B

    asics: R

    ecreating the E

    mergent

    Reading

    Experience

    1. Participants w

    ill be able to describe the experiences and em

    otions of typical- and atypical-em

    ergent readers in the classroom

    .

    This session will involve a hands-on analysis of a language

    sample from

    a first grader with specific language im

    pairment.

    We'll consider som

    e quantitative analysis (eg. MLU

    , accuracy on gram

    matical m

    orphemes) com

    plemented by a qualitative

    analysis (i.e. Sem

    antic and Pragm

    atic Qualitative A

    nalysis (Lucas, 1984)).

    Literacy D

    ay 1, Session 3:

    Monday, 1:45-3:15

    P.M

    . C

    omm

    ons, Towers

    Conference R

    oom

  • !!

    8!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 15

    Stephen G

    roner, B

    .A.

    Angela C

    hen, B.A

    . M

    atthew B

    rown,

    B.A

    ., Sarah

    Schneck, B

    .A.

    Clinical C

    ase C

    onference Hour

    (and a Half)

    Including:

    Hum

    an Biases:

    Exam

    ples in S

    ervices to a B

    oy who

    Stutters

    (Groner);

    Phonological

    Aw

    areness Training for C

    hildren with

    Language Im

    pairments

    (Chen);

    and C

    hildhood A

    praxia of S

    peech: Best

    Practices in the

    Face of Evolving

    Research

    (Brow

    n)

    1. Define and identify

    strategies for reducing biases. 2. Identify the key factors of effective phonological aw

    areness training. 3. Identify the diagnostic features of C

    AS

    and distinguish those w

    ith the greatest sensitivity and specificity. 3. Identify current treatm

    ent approaches for C

    AS

    with

    the current best evidence base.

    Groner: The rise of an extensive psychological literature on the

    presence of implicit biases in decision-m

    aking has been slow

    to enter clinical practice in speech-language pathology. Implicit

    biases consistently have been shown to have m

    easurable effects on behaviors involved in com

    municating and interacting

    with other people. Far from

    being morally reprehensible,

    implicit biases are usually helpful, tim

    e-saving tools. How

    ever, w

    hen they are incorrect, they can severely affect the quality of services provided to the students w

    e serve. In this presentation, the influence of a num

    ber of implicit biases w

    ill be discussed in relation to speech services provided to a 2nd grade boy w

    ho stutters. Prom

    ising and feasible strategies for bias reduction w

    ill be shared. C

    hen: This presentation delves into the research in phonological aw

    areness training, including those pertaining to the language im

    pairment population. It discusses factors to

    consider when teaching phonological aw

    areness, such as intensity and sequence, and offers exam

    ples of activities. The speaker draw

    s upon her experiences tutoring a child with a

    language impairm

    ent in reading and shares the successes and challenges she encountered. B

    rown: S

    ince the release of AS

    HA

    ’s position statement on

    Childhood A

    praxia of Speech in 2007, the research has been

    evolving quickly to establish a diagnostic protocol for the disorder. This presentation w

    ill provide an overview of the

    changes in diagnostics as well as a look at the differences

    between clinical perception and the research literature. A

    brief review

    of the treatment literature w

    ill also be presented to show

    the treatment approaches that currently have the m

    ost evidence in their favor.

    Fluency D

    ay 1, Session 3:

    Monday, 1:45-3:15

    P.M

    . C

    omm

    ons 320

    16 K

    rystal Werfel,

    Ph.D

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Fatigue and Learning in S

    chool-Age

    Children w

    ith H

    earing Loss

    1. Understand the im

    pact of fatigue on language-based learning in children w

    ith hearing loss

    School-age children w

    ho experience fatigue often have a num

    ber of negative social and psycho-educational problems,

    which m

    ay impact learning. R

    ecent research shows that

    children with hearing loss experience increased fatigue relative

    to peers with norm

    al hearing. This session will discuss a study

    on the fatigue in school-age children with cochlear im

    plants. W

    e will discuss how

    parent's reports of their child's fatigue com

    pare to the child's self-reported fatigue, as well as the

    impact of fatigue on language and literacy skills. Finally, w

    e w

    ill explore how fatigue can influence language interventions,

    and discuss implem

    enting language interventions with children

    experiencing fatigue.

    Hearing Loss

    Day 1, S

    ession 3: M

    onday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

  • !!

    9!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 17

    Magdelene

    Jacobs, M.S

    . It's all G

    reek to M

    e: Applying

    Research to

    Practice

    1. Identify methods of

    efficiently identifying clinically relevant findings from

    recent correlational and experim

    ental studies. 2. Identify innovative m

    ethods of adapting these findings to clinical practice.

    Clinicians are encouraged to stay up to date on current

    research findings in speech language pathology. How

    ever, it is not alw

    ays possible to find studies that report results from

    controlled interventions; rather, research studies often report findings from

    correlational or experimental studies w

    ithout clear suggestions of how

    these findings can be applied to clinical practice. In this session, w

    e will explore novel

    approaches to bridging the gap between evidence and

    practice. This exploration will involve discussions of how

    to locate, evaluate, and adapt innovative experim

    ental results to novel interventions. The session w

    ill focus on examples from

    research on w

    ord learning by children with hearing loss.

    Research to

    Practice

    Day 1, S

    ession 3: M

    onday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Hobbs, 100A

    18 M

    aureen Sanger,

    Ph.D

    . M

    aking Intelligent U

    se of Intelligence Testing

    1. Identify what intelligence

    tests measure and w

    hat IQ

    scores mean.

    Intelligence tests are widely used in school settings to aid in

    identifying students with learning disabilities and to help

    teachers tailor instruction to a student's unique profile of cognitive strengths and w

    eaknesses. The goal of this session is to dem

    ystify intelligence testing. Topics to be addressed include: (1) w

    hat IQ tests m

    easure, (2) how to interpret IQ

    scores, (3) factors that m

    ay affect IQ test perform

    ance, and (4) how

    IQ test results can inform

    classroom interventions.

    IQ,

    Assessm

    ent D

    ay 1, Session 3:

    Monday, 1:45-3:15

    P.M

    . C

    omm

    ons, M

    ultipurpose Room

    #1 and 2

    19 M

    ichael de R

    iesthal, Ph.D

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    K

    eely McM

    ahan, M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    Return to S

    chool Follow

    ing C

    oncussion: A

    ssessment,

    Treatment, and

    Strategies

    1. Describe 3 strategies for

    addressing cognitive-com

    municative issues

    when a student w

    ho experiences a concussion returns to school.

    Until recently, m

    uch of the literature on sports-related concussion has focused on successful return to play. The idea of "return to learn", or successful return to school follow

    ing concussion, is beginning to receive m

    ore attention. This presentation w

    ill address assessment, treatm

    ent, and strategies related to successful return to school for students w

    ho experience a concussion.

    TBI

    Day 1, S

    ession 3: M

    onday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Kennedy C

    enter, 241

    20 H

    eather Blalock,

    MA

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Danielle,

    Cam

    pbell, MA

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    AA

    C S

    olutions for S

    chool-Based

    SLP

    s: Evaluation

    and Im

    plementation

    1. Learn various AA

    C tools

    to evaluate students that are nonverbal/ lim

    ited verbalizations or have unintelligible speech. 2. To obtain strategies for successful im

    plementation

    of an AA

    C device in the

    classroom.

    This session will cover a variety of low

    tech -to -high tech solutions that are available to assist the S

    LP w

    hen evaluating a student that is prim

    arily nonverbal or has unintelligible speech. It w

    ill also cover strategies to support IEP

    teams w

    ith im

    plementing the use of an A

    AC

    device throughout the student's school day.

    AA

    C

    Day 2, S

    ession 1: Tuesday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #1

    21 Jam

    ie D. Fisher,

    Ph.D

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Classroom

    -Based

    Intervention for S

    peech, Language, and Literacy

    1. Identify research regarding classroom

    based intervention (C

    BI), design

    and implem

    ent CB

    I, and to collaborate w

    ith teachers to provide effective C

    BI.

    The role of the school-based Speech-Language P

    athologist (S

    LP) is not only to select effective therapeutic m

    ethods and approaches for students, but also to select an effective m

    ethod of service delivery in the least restrictive environm

    ent. As

    support towards inclusion increases in school districts across

    the country, SLP

    s are expected to utilize classroom-based

    intervention (CB

    I) as an inclusive method of service delivery.

    To equip SLP

    s with know

    ledge and strategies for CB

    I, this session w

    ill address CB

    I research, designing and im

    plementing C

    BI, and collaborative team

    ing.

    Inclusion D

    ay 2, Session 1:

    Tuesday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

  • !!

    10!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 22

    Melanie

    Cham

    bers, M.A

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    A

    llison Drost,

    M.A

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Jack Henderson,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    JoAnne B

    erns, M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    K

    risten Arthurs,

    M.S

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    For CFs O

    nly: P

    lanning for S

    uccessful CF

    Mentoring

    1. Formulate a plan for their

    CF year that specifies w

    hat they w

    ould like to gain from

    the supervision aspect of their C

    F experience.

    In this session, three recent CFs and tw

    o SLP

    s who provide

    CF supervision in the schools w

    ill talk about their ideas for successful C

    F mentoring. The first 45 m

    inutes will be devoted

    to a brief presentation by each panelist; the last 45 minutes w

    ill be devoted to questions, answ

    ers, and discussion. This is a special session planned to address the needs of new

    school S

    LPs w

    ho will be com

    pleting their CF in 2014-15 or w

    ho are in the m

    iddle of their CF.

    CFY

    s D

    ay 2, Session 1:

    Tuesday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons, Tow

    ers C

    onference Room

    23 C

    . Melanie

    Schuele, P

    h.D.,

    CC

    C-S

    LP

    Intensive P

    honological A

    wareness

    Program

    : A Tier 2

    Standard

    Treatment

    Protocol

    1. Explain the benefits of a

    standard protocol. 2. D

    escribe the sequence of phonological aw

    areness intervention.

    This session will describe the essential com

    ponents of a Tier 2 phonological aw

    areness intervention. Intervention strategies to scaffold learning w

    ill be practiced. D

    r. Schuele is the author of The Intensive P

    honological A

    wareness P

    rogram and receives royalties from

    Brookes

    Publishing.

    Literacy, A

    ssessment

    Day 2, S

    ession 1: Tuesday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Kennedy C

    enter, 241

    24 N

    ikki Davis, P

    h.D.

    The Science of

    the Dyslexic B

    rain 1. G

    ain knowledge about

    the neurobiological correlates of reading disability. 2. O

    btain tools they need to critically evaluate current and future research findings in this area (and to evaluate their ow

    n understanding of the findings).

    In 2003, the first research article was published indicating that

    the brain activation of individuals with reading difficulty

    changed after receiving language-based intervention. I was

    curious about these findings. In my experiences, people w

    ith dyslexia continued to struggle w

    ith reading, despite receiving years of language-based intervention. C

    ould the brain change and the behavior stay the sam

    e? Was there a difference in the

    brain changes associated with accuracy and those associated

    with fluency? A

    desire to know the answ

    ers to these questions set m

    e on a path that I am still on today. This talk is a

    summ

    ary of what I have learned so far. R

    esearch on this disability is dispersed through the fields of neuroscience, psychology, language, and education. The m

    ost powerful

    approach for the investigation of reading disabilities is a com

    prehensive one that considers the neural, cognitive, and linguistic com

    ponents of reading skill.

    Dyslexia,

    Neuro-

    science

    Day 2, S

    ession 1: Tuesday, 8:30-10:00 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #2

    25 Jennifer C

    . M

    uckala, M.A

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    C

    arolyn K.

    Novaleski, M

    .S.

    A P

    ractical Guide

    on Voice

    Disorders in the

    School-B

    ased S

    etting

    1. To describe three voice therapy techniques that can be im

    plemented w

    ith school-age children.

    School S

    peech-Language Pathologists often find it challenging

    to determine their role in evaluating and treating students w

    ith voice disorders. This session w

    ill provide a comprehensive

    overview of w

    orking with voice disorders in the school-based

    setting. Topics will include a review

    of the perceptual evaluation of voice, distinguishing phonatory voice versus resonance disorders, proper referral procedures, and fundam

    ental principles of voice therapy techniques. Video

    examples w

    ill be presented of anatomically and physiologically

    based voice disorders comm

    on in children. Em

    phasis will be

    placed on educationally relevant justification for speech services. A

    ctive participation and group practice of voice therapy techniques is encouraged.

    Voice

    Day 2, S

    ession 2: Tuesday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #2

  • !!

    11!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 26

    C. M

    elanie S

    chuele, Ph.D

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    Language S

    ampling 101:

    Analysis P

    ractice

    1. Decide and im

    plement

    quantitative measures of

    spontaneous language. 2. C

    onduct and interpret sem

    antic and pragmatic

    qualitative analysis.

    This session will involve a hands-on analysis of a language

    sample from

    a first grader with specific language im

    pairment.

    We'll consider som

    e quantitative analysis (eg. MLU

    , accuracy on gram

    matical m

    orphemes) com

    plemented by a qualitative

    analysis (i.e. Sem

    antic and Pragm

    atic Qualitative A

    nalysis, Lucas, 1984).

    Language, A

    ssessment

    Day 2, S

    ession 2: Tuesday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Kennedy C

    enter, 241

    27 Lorry Liotta-K

    leinfeld, Ed.D

    ., O

    TR/L, B

    CP

    OT and S

    LP

    Collaboration for

    Handw

    riting S

    uccess

    1. Describe three w

    ays to prom

    ote handwriting

    competencies w

    ithin therapy and in collaborations w

    ith classroom

    teachers.

    Children use the sensory and m

    otor skills necessary to write

    while they sim

    ultaneously use the cognitive and com

    munication skills to express their ideas on paper. C

    hildren w

    ho struggle with handw

    riting, may benefit from

    collaborative O

    T and SLP

    intervention. During this session, exam

    ples of O

    T/SLP

    collaborative activities to foster pre-writing skills and

    writing skills including pencil grasp, positioning, digital control,

    directionality, line production, and expressive language skills w

    ill be explored Participants w

    ill engage in collaborative case-based problem

    solving and share treatment ideas.

    Literacy D

    ay 2, Session 2:

    Tuesday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons, Tow

    ers C

    onference Room

    28 E

    mily D

    ayle Q

    uinn, M.S

    ., C

    CC

    -SLP

    C

    ourtney Wright,

    Ph.D

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Teaching C

    omm

    unication, N

    ot Just Language, U

    sing the iP

    ad

    1. Be able to describe the

    value of and demonstrate

    modeling language using

    voice output com

    munication aids or

    other low-tech visual aids.

    The iPad is a new

    and exciting technology being used more

    and more in classroom

    s and therapy rooms everyw

    here. This presentation w

    ill focus on using the iPad to increase functional

    comm

    unication. Research-based strategies including

    modeling, tim

    e delay strategies, and using natural consequences w

    ill be introduced and demonstrated through

    video clips.

    AA

    C

    Day 2, S

    ession 2: Tuesday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

    29 R

    obin Jones, P

    h.D., C

    CC

    -SLP

    Jack H

    enderson, M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    What I W

    ish My

    School S

    LP K

    new

    about Working

    with S

    tudents W

    ho Stutter

    1. Discuss the im

    portance of addressing affective and cognitive aspects of stuttering for the school-age child.

    The presenters for this webinar are certified S

    peech-Language P

    athologists who stutter, both of w

    hich have a special interest in stuttering. The purpose of this session is to present and discuss insights and inform

    ation for school-based Speech-

    Language Pathologists on w

    orking with children w

    ho stutter. These insights, inform

    ation, and reflections will be organized in

    affective, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of stuttering. The presenters w

    ill provide suggestions that the school Speech-

    Language Pathologist can im

    plement in the clinical setting.

    Fluency D

    ay 2, Session 2:

    Tuesday, 10:15-11:45 A

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #1

    30 E

    llen M. K

    elly, P

    h.D.

    Hatun Zengin-

    Bolatkale, M

    .A.,

    CC

    C-S

    LP

    Case S

    tudies in C

    hildhood S

    tuttering

    1. To identify the steps in a com

    prehensive case assessm

    ent of children w

    ho stutter for determ

    ination of therapy goals and procedures.

    Children w

    ho stutter, from preschoolers to teenagers, present

    with a com

    plex mix of behavioral, attitudinal, em

    otional and possible concom

    itant (e.g., language, speech, pragmatic,

    behavioral, etc.) concerns. In this session, four different cases w

    ill be presented involving children who are of (1) preschool,

    (2) elementary, (3) m

    iddle school/junior high, and (4) high school age w

    ith different profiles of disfluencies and other sym

    ptoms/ concerns. The decision processes used in each

    case to determine strengths, needs, and therapeutic goals and

    procedures will be presented and discussed w

    ith input from

    attendees. D

    r. Kelly’s w

    ork if funded by the Stuttering Foundation of

    Am

    erica.

    Fluency D

    ay 2, Session 3:

    Tuesday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose R

    oom

    #1 and 2

  • !!

    12!

    # P

    resenter(s) Title

    Learning Objective(s)

    Abstract

    Topic Tim

    e and Location 31

    Hannah K

    rimm

    , M

    .S., C

    CC

    -SLP

    D

    ata-Based

    Therapy: Applying

    Single-C

    ase R

    esearch Design

    in the Schools

    1. To be able to apply single-case research design principles to inform

    clinical decisions.

    School S

    LPs m

    ust write and m

    onitor progress on specific, m

    easureable goals. SLP

    s can apply the principles of single-case research design to m

    onitor progress and support treatm

    ent decisions. This session will offer an overview

    of single-case design and its applicability for school-based S

    LPs.

    Specific exam

    ples in relation to targeting speech sound production skills w

    ill be discussed. Attendees w

    ill practice applying principles of single-case research design to clinical practice.

    Research to

    Practice

    Day 2, S

    ession 3: Tuesday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Com

    mons, Tow

    ers C

    onference Room

    32 K

    rystal Werfel,

    Ph.D

    ., CC

    C-S

    LP

    Language-Based

    Spelling

    Assessm

    ent and Intervention for S

    chool-Age

    Children

    1. Explain how

    spoken language know

    ledge and skills influence spelling achievem

    ent. 2. Develop

    individualized language-based spelling assessm

    ents. 3. Identify language-based spelling intervention strategies.

    Recent research has confirm

    ed the linguistic basis of spelling achievem

    ent. How

    ever, spelling assessment and intervention

    continues to be heavily focused on rote mem

    orization of words

    rather than linguistic properties of words. This presentation w

    ill provide (a) an overview

    of how spoken language know

    ledge and skills, including m

    etalinguistic knowledge, im

    pacts spelling achievem

    ent and (b) a discussion of how to select and/or

    develop appropriate spelling assessments and interventions

    for children on your caseload. The session will include hands-

    on experience putting to practice the principles discussed.

    Literacy D

    ay 2, Session 3:

    Tuesday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Kennedy C

    enter, 241

    33 R

    ae Schaper,

    M.E

    d. The B

    enefits of U

    sing Literature and R

    epetition for Y

    oung Children

    with A

    utism and

    Language Delays

    1. Give ten exam

    ples of how

    to use repeated recitations of fam

    iliar literature to effectively elicit expressive speech w

    henever possible and facilitate the com

    prehension of foundational concepts.

    Young children w

    ith autism thrive in an environm

    ent filled with

    visual cues, familiarity and predictability. W

    hen these three factors are com

    bined with repeated readings of fam

    iliar children's literature, cognitive learning and language skills flourish. There are specific strategies for com

    bining literature w

    ith repetition that have been proven to be successful in helping children w

    ith autism and language delays m

    ake significant gains in speech and language. This presentation w

    ill outline and give examples of those strategies. A

    ctivities and techniques w

    ill be presented that can be shared by therapists and classroom

    teachers. M

    s. Schaper is the author of m

    ultiple curricula in which she

    has a financial interest.

    AS

    D,

    Language D

    ay 2, Session 3:

    Tuesday, 1:45-3:15 P

    .M.

    Com

    mons 335

    !

  • RoomVanderbilt Kennedy Center, Room

    241The Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose Room

    #1The Com

    mons,

    Multipurpose Room

    #2Tow

    ers Conference RoomCom

    mons 335

    Comm

    ons 320Hobbs 100A

    Hobbs 100BLibrary Room

    # seats75

    7550

    2050

    2050

    50M

    onday

    8:30 - 10:00

    1). Dunn Davison: Instructional Support for Reading and W

    riting in English Language Learners

    5). Wallace: The ABCs of

    Improving Com

    munication

    for Children with ASD

    2). Myers: SLPs, Reading

    Assessments, and Finding

    New

    Friends

    4). Henderson: Support Groups for Parents of

    Children who Stutter: Case

    Example and Feasibility in

    the Public Schools

    3). Blankenship: Speech Perception and Language Abilities in Children w

    ith Hearing Loss: Practical

    Application

    7). Gillum: W

    hat's Language Got To Do W

    ith It?

    6). Schuele: Vanderbilt Schools SLP Track Preceptors:

    Mentoring Graduate Students Com

    mitted to School SLP

    Careers (by invitation only)

    10:15 - 11:45

    9). Werfel: Em

    ergent Literacy in Children w

    ith Hearing Loss

    12). Loring & Blum

    berg: Teaching Pragm

    atic Language Skills to Children

    with Autism

    Spectrum

    Disorders

    11). Berns & Som

    mers:

    Improving Literacy through

    Speech-Language Therapy

    13). Hampton et al: Teach-

    Model-Coach-Review

    : A M

    ethod for Training Parents in N

    aturalistic Interventions

    8). Blankenship et al: Clinical Supervision of Student

    Clinicians in a School Setting: How

    to Make it Effective and

    Fun

    10). Gillum: For CFs O

    nly: A Focus on Curriculum

    and Collaboration from

    the First Day

    12:30-1:30Lunch Talk

    1:45 - 3:15

    19). de Riesthal & M

    cMahan:

    Return to School Following

    Concussion: Assessment,

    Treatment, and Strategies

    14). Liang & Feldm

    an: Back to Basics: Recreating the

    Emergent Reading Experience

    16). Werfel: Fatigue and

    Learning in School-Age Children w

    ith Hearing Loss

    17). Jacobs: It's all Greek to m

    e: Applying Research to Practice

    Tuesday

    8:30 - 10:00

    23). Schuele: Intensive Phonological Aw

    areness Program

    : A Tier 2 Standard Treatm

    ent Protocol

    20). Blalock & Cam

    pbell: AAC Solutions for School-Based

    SLPs: Evaluation and Im

    plementation

    24). Davis: The Science of the Dyslexic Brain

    22). Chambers et al: For CFs

    Only: Planning for Successful

    CF Mentoring

    21). Fisher: Classroom-Based

    Intervention for Speech, Language, and Literacy

    10:15 - 11:45

    26). Schuele: Language Sam

    pling 101: Analysis Practice

    29). Jones & Henderson:

    What I W

    ish my School SLP

    Knew about W

    orking with

    Children who Stutter

    25). Muckala &

    Novaleski: A

    Practical Guide on Voice Disorders in the School-Based Setting

    27). Liotta-Kleinfeld: OT and

    SLP Collaboration for Handw

    riting Success

    28). Dayle Quinn &

    Wright:

    Teaching Comm

    unication, N

    ot Just Language, Using the iPad

    12:30-1:30Lunch Talk

    1:45 - 3:15

    32). Werfel: Language-Based

    Spelling Assessment and

    Intervention for School-Age Children

    31). Krimm

    : Data-Based Therapy: Applying Single Case Research Design in the Schools

    33). Schaper: The Benefits of Using Literature and Repetition for Young Children w

    ith Autism and

    Language Delays

    30). Kelly & Zengin-Bolatkale: Case Studies in Childhood

    Stuttering

    Plenary Lunch Session

    Schuele et al: Alphabet Soup: Does it Matter w

    hat we Call Children w

    ith Learning Disabilities?

    SCHOO

    L SPEECH-LANGU

    AGE PATHOLO

    GY CON

    FERENCE AT VAN

    DERBILTAUGUST 3-4, 2015

    18). Sanger: Making Intelligent Use of Intelligence Testing

    15). Groner, Chen, Brown &

    Schneck: Clinical Case Conference Hour (and a Half)

  • Please keep and use this map for the duration of the conference.

    SCHOOL SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY CONFERENCE AT VANDERBILT AUGUST 3-4, 2015

    Peabody Campus Map

    1. The Commons Center

    Commons Multipurpose Room 1 will be used for: i. Sign in both mornings

    ii. Lunch sessions both days iii. Sessions numbered: 5, 12, 18, 20, 29, and 30.

    Commons Multipurpose Room 2 will be used for: i. Sign in both mornings

    ii. Lunch sessions both days iii. Sessions numbered: 2, 11, 18, 24, 25, and 30.

    Towers Conference Room 233 will be used for sessions numbered: 4, 13, 14, 22, 27, and 31. Commons 335 will be used for sessions numbered: 3, 8, 16, 21, 28, and 33. Commons 320 will be used for session 17.

    2. Hobbs Human Development Lab Hobbs Room 100A will be used for sessions numbered: 7, 10, and 15.

    3. Vanderbilt Kennedy Center The Kennedy Center Room 241 will be used for sessions numbered: 1, 9, 19, 23, 26, and 32.

    4. Peabody Library Session 6 will be held in the Peabody Library