The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People Habit 1: Be Proactive Habit 2: Begin With the End in Mind Habit 3: Put First Things First Habit 4: Think Win-win

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  • The Seven Habits of Highly Effective PeopleHabit 1: Be ProactiveHabit 2: Begin With the End in MindHabit 3: Put First Things FirstHabit 4: Think Win-winHabit 5: Seek First To Understand, Then to Be UnderstoodHabit 6: SynergizeHabit 7: Sharpen the Saw

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • From the Moment of Birth We Conditioned Ourselves to Develop Personal Habits and As We Grow Older We Fall Victim of Such Conditioning. But We Are Not Our Habits. We Can Make and Break Them.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Habits are patterns of behavior composed of three overlapping components: knowledgeattitudes skillsAnd since these are learned rather than inherited, our habits constitute our second nature, not our first.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • But, we are not our habits Hence, we should avoid defining ourselves in terms of our habits and characteristic tendencies. Habits of effectiveness can be learned; habits of ineffectiveness, unlearned.All successful people have the habit of doing the things failures dont like to do. They dont like doing them either, necessarily, but their dislike is subordinated to the strength of their purpose.

    Successful people daily weave habits of effectiveness into their lives in order to achieve desired results. Often, they are internally motivated by a strong sense of mission.By subordinating their dislike for certain tasks to their goals, they commonly develop seven basic habits and discipline their lives in accordance with the underlying principles.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • The Character Ethic and the Personality EthicThe Seven Habits grew out of Dr. Stephen R. Coveys extensive review of success literature in America since 1776. In his research, he discovered that during the nations formative years years and throughout its first 150 years, the character ethic (moral qualities of self-discipline) was emphasized over personality development. Prominently featured were such traits as temperance, sincerity, humility, courage, integrity, honesty, industry, and thrift. The character Ethic taught that there are certain basic principles of enduring happiness as they learn and intergrate these principles into their basic character.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Since the 1930s, however, the emphasis has steadily shifted from character to personality or influence techniques, methods, and skills all designed to achieve quick and painless results.

    The success literature of recent years has virtually severed social and career development from character development, leaving people uprooted and swayed by the whims of others and the winds of expediency. This Personality Ethic teaches that success is a function of public image, of attitudes and behaviors, skills and formulas that lubricate the processes of human interaction. This personality-based approach often becomes manipulative, even deceptive, encouraging people to use techniques to get other people to like them, or to fake interest in the hobbies of others to get out of them what they want, or to intimidate their way through life.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Timeless PrinciplesCharacter, basically, is a composite of habits. The Seven Habits are based upon the timeless principle called the Law of the Harvest: we tend to reap what we sow. Sow a thought, reap an action; sow an action, reap a habit; sow a habit, reap a character; sow a character, reap a destiny, the maxim goes.Habits are powerful factors in our lives. Because they are consistent, often unconscious patterns, they constantly, daily, express our character and produce our effectiveness or ineffectiveness.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Those who watched the lunar voyage of Apollo 11 were transfixed as the first men walked on the moon and returned to earth. But to get there, those astronauts literally had to break out of the tremendous gravity pull of the earth. More energy was spent in the first few minutes of lift off, in the first few miles of travel, than was used over the next several days to travel half a million miles.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Habits, too, have tremendous gravity pull-more than most people realize or would admit. Breaking deeply imbedded habitual tendencies such as procrastination, impatience, criticalness, or selfishness that violate basic principles of human effectiveness involves more than a little willpower and a few minor changes in our lives. Liftoff takes a tremendous effort, but once we break out of the pull of gravity, our freedom takes on a whole new dimension.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Like any natural force, gravity can work with us or against us. The gravity pull of some of our habits may currently be keeping us from going where we want to go. But it is also gravity that keeps our world together, that keeps the planets in their orbits and our universe in order. It is a powerful force, and if we use it effectively, we can use the gravity pull of habit to create the cohesiveness and order necessary to establish effectiveness in our lives.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Effectiveness and BalanceWe are effective when we balance Production and Production Capability.Most people, when they talk about being effective, mean getting results. Getting results is certainly a key part of being effective, but thats not all there is to it. Effectiveness has a second dimension as well.That second dimension of effectiveness is preserving and enhancing our assets. By assets, we mean more than just money, equipment, and buildings. We also mean things like physical health, mental alertness, emotional stability, skills, knowledge, values, and relationships with other people. These intangibles are assets because we cant produce results without them. That is why effective people pay attention to them and why this definition of effectiveness has an extra dimension that deals with them.

    PART I

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Production (P) and production Capability (PC)The point is that consistent effectiveness always comes from a balance - a balance between results and the assets that produce results. We call the results Production, which we abbreviate with the letter P. We call the assets Production Capability, which we abbreviate PC. Effectiveness then, is a balance between Production and Production Capability, or P and PC.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Our Production Capability comes from three kinds of assets: physical, financial, and human.To most people, assets mean the sort of things that we list on a balance sheet, mainly money and capital equipment. Most corporations, however, now recognize that people are assets as well. People are the human resource, and human resource management is becoming an increasingly important item on the corporate agenda.

    Of course, human resources belong on our personal agenda as well. We are fully effective only when we attend to the human elements of our lives, beginning with ourselves. We are our most important human resource, followed closely by the relationship that we have with other people. Humana assets, added to the usual balance-sheet, make three asset categories: physical, financial, and human. Physical assets are office, car, tools, equipment, and so on. Financial assets are the various forms of money.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Human assets, added to the usual balance-sheet assets, make three asset categories: physical, financial, and human. Physical assets are office, car, tools, equipment, and so on. Financial assets are the various forms of money. Human assets are such things as health, talent, education, and our relationships with other people. The three kinds of assets form our Production Capability, that extra dimension that allows us to become truly effective.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Of the three kinds of assets, human assets are the most important and often the most neglected.On the whole, human assets are more important than physical or financial assets because they determine how the other two assets are used. They become more important as organizations become more complex or more dependent on expensive and complicated technology.Among the various human assets, relationships are particularly important. Weak relationships cause poor communication, tension, disagreements, jealousy, back-biting, and criticism-negative elements that are costly, both to the organization and to us as individuals. They drain time, energy, and resources that we might otherwise turn into corporate profit and personal fulfillment.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Human assets are often neglected, perhaps because theyre less tangible. Its harder to know their condition and what to do affect them. In addition, when we act on physical and financial assets, we dont have to consider how they feel, nor do we have to take into account how they might act back. But people the reservoirs of human resources-have feelings and act back, so we have to deal, not just with action, but with interaction, which is both more subtle and more complicated. As a result, its easy to avoid dealing with human assets until they cause problems that cant be ignored.

    From The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

  • Part 2 The Emotional Bank AccountA metaphor about relationship. The Emotional Bank Account represents the amount of trust that has been built up in the relationship.We bui