Click here to load reader

The Sentence and Its Parts Subjects (Simple, Complete, & Compound) Predicates (Simple, Complete, & Compound) Subject Complements & Direct/Indirect Objects

  • View
    225

  • Download
    5

Embed Size (px)

Text of The Sentence and Its Parts Subjects (Simple, Complete, & Compound) Predicates (Simple, Complete,...

  • Slide 1
  • The Sentence and Its Parts Subjects (Simple, Complete, & Compound) Predicates (Simple, Complete, & Compound) Subject Complements & Direct/Indirect Objects
  • Slide 2
  • Simple Subjects & Predicates Just like the Golden Gate Bridge has two large towers, every sentence has two basic parts: a subject and a predicate. Both parts are usually necessary for the meaning of a group of words to be clear. When one of these is missing, the group of words is a fragment.
  • Slide 3
  • Definitions and Examples The subject tells who or what the sentence is about. The young girl biked across the Golden Gate Bridge. The predicate tells what the subject is or does or what happens to the subject. The young girl biked across the Golden Gate Bridge. The simple subject is the key word or words in the subject; the simple predicate is the verb or verb phrase that tells something about the subject.
  • Slide 4
  • Lets Practice 1.People rode ferries to get across San Francisco Bay before the Golden Gate Bridge was built. 2.By the early twentieth century, the Bay was clogged with ferries. 3.In the 1920s, engineer and bridge-builder Joseph Strauss proposed the construction of a new bridge that would span the Golden Gate. 4.Golden Gate Bridge history began when San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved $35 million in bonds to construct the Golden Gate Bridge. 5.The now-familiar art deco design and International Red color were chosen, and construction began in 1933.
  • Slide 5
  • Lets Practice 1.People rode ferries to get across San Francisco Bay before the Golden Gate Bridge was built. 2.By the early twentieth century, the Bay was clogged with ferries. 3.In the 1920s, engineer and bridge-builder Joseph Strauss proposed the construction of a new bridge that would span the Golden Gate. 4.Golden Gate Bridge history began when San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved $35 million in bonds to construct the Golden Gate Bridge. 5.The now-familiar art deco design and International Red color were chosen, and construction began in 1933.
  • Slide 6
  • Important Reminder Simple subjects and simple predicates do not include any modifying words, phrases, or clauses. The violent storm furiously battered the fragile sailboat. A large flock of seagulls steadily followed behind the sailboat.
  • Slide 7
  • Complete Subjects & Predicates The complete subject includes the simple subject and all the words that modify or tell more about it. The complete predicate includes the verb and all the words that modify or tell more about it. The young and talented surfer was riding the wave toward the beach.
  • Slide 8
  • Lets Practice 1.People rode ferries to get across San Francisco Bay before the Golden Gate Bridge was built. 2.By the early twentieth century, the Bay was clogged with ferries. 3.In the 1920s, engineer and bridge-builder Joseph Strauss proposed the construction of a new bridge that a bridge across the Golden Gate. 4.Golden Gate Bridge history began when San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved $35 million in bonds to construct the Golden Gate Bridge. 5.The now-familiar art deco design and International Red color were chosen, and construction began in 1933.
  • Slide 9
  • Lets Practice 1.People rode ferries to get across San Francisco Bay before the Golden Gate Bridge was built. 2.By the early twentieth century, the Bay was clogged with ferries. 3.In the 1920s, engineer and bridge-builder Joseph Strauss proposed the construction of a new bridge that a bridge across the Golden Gate. 4.Golden Gate Bridge history began when San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved $35 million in bonds to construct the Golden Gate Bridge. 5.The now-familiar art deco design and International Red color were chosen, and construction began in 1933.
  • Slide 10
  • Compound Subjects and Verbs The sun and its reflection on the water created a beautiful picture and signaled the end of the day. A sentence can have more than one subject or verb. A compound subject is made up of two or more subjects that share a verb. A compound verb is made up of two or more verbs or verb phrases that are joined by a conjunction and have the same subject.
  • Slide 11
  • Compound Predicates A compound predicate is made up of a compound verb and all the words that go with each verb. The setting sun dipped behind the mountain and turned the sky to a bright red and magenta color.
  • Slide 12
  • Lets Practice 1.Children and adults can survive frigid water for a long time. 2.Cold water signals the brain and triggers a diving reflex. 3.The brain slows and needs only half the normal level of oxygen. 4.Electrical activity and chemical actions in the brain keep the body alive. 5.The heart and brain can survive 40 or 50 minutes in this state.
  • Slide 13
  • Lets Practice 1.Children and adults can survive frigid water for a long time. 2.Cold water signals the brain and triggers a diving reflex. 3.The brain slows and needs only half the normal level of oxygen. 4.Electrical activity and chemical actions in the brain keep the body alive. 5.The heart and brain can survive 40 or 50 minutes in this state.
  • Slide 14
  • Why it Matters in Writing If you cant find a simple subject and a simple predicate in your sentence, youve created a FRAGMENT. Using compound parts can help make your writing more concise and help show relation- ships between ideas. Adding details to simple subjects and predicates can help you convey your ideas more clearly to the reader.

Search related