1
173 NEW PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND. to say that our medical service is not properly prepared and organised at the present time to take the part that it should in any really big war. What will be required in future is not so much, perhaps, a defensive home army as the organisation of some scheme for an Imperial army with an Imperial medical service as a component part thereof, which shall be more in harmony with the new and altered conditions of the British Empire. We do not despair of some scheme of this kind being initiated at the forthcoming conference of the colonial delegates next year. Mr. HALDANE spoke words of admirable sense in his references to the health of the army, and the views and intentions of the Government in regard to the medical, sanitary, and hos- pital services in time of war will have been carefully read and studied by all concerned. He enumerated briefly but correctly the chief sources of disease in an army on field service, and stated how it was proposed to deal with them respectively, giving a very brief outline of a scheme, already partly in opera- tion, drawn up for that purpose by Sir ALFRED H. KEOGH, the Director.General of the Army Medical Service. Taking all this into consideration we find that Mr. HALDANE’s pro- posals as a whole are indicative of a sincere and earnest purpose to improve our army as a fighting machine, to insure for it better medical equipment, and at the same time tc save the public purse. It is inevitable, however, that hil scheme should come in for severe criticism from militar authorities. Annotations. THE NEW PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND. " Ne quid nimis." AT a meeting of the Council of the Royal College of Surgeons of England held on July 12th Mr. Henry Morris was elected President and Mr. Edmund Owen and Mr. Rickman J. Godlee were appointed Vice-Presidents. To Mr. Morris, who has thus attained the highest honour which it is in the power of the corporation to which he belongs to bestow, we offer our hearty congratulations. Mr. Morris is well known as an able and energetic worker in the field of surgery in general, while he has made for himself a wide- spread reputation in that department of surgical science which deals with the genito-urinary apparatus. He has won for himself reward in the hearty recognition of the value of his work accorded by his brother practitioners, while the public has been prompt to recognise in him a friend of exceptional skill. His practical and enthusiastic interest in the cause of medical education especially the education of the London student, wa: shown by his recent gift of the sum of 1000 tc the endowment fund of the Middlesex Hospital Medica School. Mr. Morris’s views upon medical education ar worthy of the consideration of everyone who is interested i] the subject, and though we ourselves have not always bee] able to see eye to eye with him, yet we must acknowledg his whole-hearted wish for the improvement and reform c medical education in London. It will be remembered ho’ ably he set forth his point of view in the address delivere by him before the Medical Society of London on May 15t1 1905. A strong man, one who knows clearly what he wan and who can explain his views in simple well-turne sentences, Mr. Morris should prove an able presiding offiel of the corporation which has entrusted its destinies for tl present to bis hands. In offering him our’’best wishes’ in his new post we also take the opportunity of congratulating Mr. Tweedy upon the successful conduct of the affairs of the College during the long period of his administration which has now come to an end. Mr. Tweedy’s labours as President of the College were complicated by the fact that he was during a part of the same period President of the Ophthalmological Society, but he allowed no call, private or official, to stand between him and the energetic discharge of his duties towards the College. SERVIA AND THE CHICAGO MEAT SCANDAL. N the report by our Special Sanitary, Commissioner on Chicago stockyards which was published on Jan. 7th, )5, there occurs the following paragraph: I I Several years a when in Servia, I was consulted by the authorities as what could be done to improve the material resources of a country. The founders of both rival dynasties, the Kara- orgewitch and the Obrenovitch houses, had been engaged the rearing of pigs. Indeed, pigs and prunes are the incipal products of the country, so I urged that instead of nding at great cost living pigs to the Hungarian markets a odel slaughter-house should be constructed according tq Le latest principles of sanitary science. Close to Belgrade, ther on the banks of the Save or of the Danube, there is i abundance of vacant space admirably suited for such a urpose. Here shambles made mainly with iTon’and glass, athed in daylight and sunlight, with double ventilating )ofs, could be constructed. Of course, there would be good tboratories for bacteriological research and microscopical xamination. With such measures and precautions the products might attract many purchasers by reason of the ecurity which enlightened scientific and State control would nsure. Is it now too late for such arguments to be applied t Chicago ? " It is obvious that much trouble might have )een saved if the arguments as suggested had been applied Lt the Chicago stockyards. According to the Daily Mail, ihe imports of tinned meats to the Albert Docks, London, rom Boston and New Orleans, which consist of Chicago products, amounted in June, 1905, to 27,000 cases; but here were only 4000 cases in June, 1908. In July, 1905, 24,000 cases came over; but in July this year not a single case was landed. Not only, however, is the Chicago trade with England thus falling off but it has been stated in several papers that Servia is going to enter the lists as a competing power. According to the Neace Freie Presse English capitalists are expected to come to the rescue of Servia in the difficulties which arise as a consequence of the constant conflict between that small State and her powerful neighbour Austria. When- ever Servia fails to bow to the exigencies of Austrian diplomacy some form of cattle disease and swine plague is found to prevail and the Austro-Hungarian frontier is- closed to the Servian hogs or cattle. The principal trade of the country is thus paralysed. Therefore it would be a, great advantage for Servia to do its own slaughtering of beasts and to preserve and to pack its own meat. For these reasons it is stated that a group of English capitalists are about to visit Belgrade with the view of making arrangements so as to found a new stockyard and packing town near Bel- grade. Certainly there is an opening for the creation of this industry on scientific lines, the first object being to provide food products in such a manner that so sort of suspicion as to their wholesomeness could arise. This the Servian State might have undertaken to its own profit, direct and indirect, without interfering with any vested interest, for these do not exist in that somewhat primitive country. It would be difficult in making the attempt to find a better moment-a better psychological moment, as Prince Bismarck would have said-than the present. But the Servian Government, , in its eagerness to secure such assistance as may reduce

THE NEW PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND

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173NEW PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND.

to say that our medical service is not properly preparedand organised at the present time to take the part thatit should in any really big war. What will be requiredin future is not so much, perhaps, a defensive home

army as the organisation of some scheme for an Imperialarmy with an Imperial medical service as a componentpart thereof, which shall be more in harmony with thenew and altered conditions of the British Empire. We do

not despair of some scheme of this kind being initiated at theforthcoming conference of the colonial delegates next year.Mr. HALDANE spoke words of admirable sense in his referencesto the health of the army, and the views and intentions of

the Government in regard to the medical, sanitary, and hos-pital services in time of war will have been carefully read andstudied by all concerned. He enumerated briefly but correctlythe chief sources of disease in an army on field service, andstated how it was proposed to deal with them respectively,giving a very brief outline of a scheme, already partly in opera-tion, drawn up for that purpose by Sir ALFRED H. KEOGH,the Director.General of the Army Medical Service. Takingall this into consideration we find that Mr. HALDANE’s pro-

posals as a whole are indicative of a sincere and earnest

purpose to improve our army as a fighting machine, to insurefor it better medical equipment, and at the same time tcsave the public purse. It is inevitable, however, that hilscheme should come in for severe criticism from militarauthorities.

_______________

Annotations.

THE NEW PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL COLLEGEOF SURGEONS OF ENGLAND.

" Ne quid nimis."

AT a meeting of the Council of the Royal College of

Surgeons of England held on July 12th Mr. Henry Morriswas elected President and Mr. Edmund Owen and Mr.

Rickman J. Godlee were appointed Vice-Presidents. To Mr.

Morris, who has thus attained the highest honour which itis in the power of the corporation to which he belongs tobestow, we offer our hearty congratulations. Mr. Morris iswell known as an able and energetic worker in the field of

surgery in general, while he has made for himself a wide-spread reputation in that department of surgical sciencewhich deals with the genito-urinary apparatus. He has won

for himself reward in the hearty recognition of the

value of his work accorded by his brother practitioners,while the public has been prompt to recognise inhim a friend of exceptional skill. His practical andenthusiastic interest in the cause of medical education

especially the education of the London student, wa:

shown by his recent gift of the sum of 1000 tc

the endowment fund of the Middlesex Hospital MedicaSchool. Mr. Morris’s views upon medical education ar

worthy of the consideration of everyone who is interested i]the subject, and though we ourselves have not always bee]able to see eye to eye with him, yet we must acknowledghis whole-hearted wish for the improvement and reform cmedical education in London. It will be remembered ho’

ably he set forth his point of view in the address delivereby him before the Medical Society of London on May 15t11905. A strong man, one who knows clearly what he wanand who can explain his views in simple well-turne

sentences, Mr. Morris should prove an able presiding offielof the corporation which has entrusted its destinies for tl

present to bis hands. In offering him our’’best wishes’ inhis new post we also take the opportunity of congratulatingMr. Tweedy upon the successful conduct of the affairs ofthe College during the long period of his administrationwhich has now come to an end. Mr. Tweedy’s labours asPresident of the College were complicated by the fact thathe was during a part of the same period President of theOphthalmological Society, but he allowed no call, privateor official, to stand between him and the energeticdischarge of his duties towards the College.

SERVIA AND THE CHICAGO MEAT SCANDAL.

N the report by our Special Sanitary, Commissioner onChicago stockyards which was published on Jan. 7th,)5, there occurs the following paragraph: I I Several yearsa when in Servia, I was consulted by the authorities aswhat could be done to improve the material resources ofa country. The founders of both rival dynasties, the Kara-orgewitch and the Obrenovitch houses, had been engagedthe rearing of pigs. Indeed, pigs and prunes are theincipal products of the country, so I urged that instead ofnding at great cost living pigs to the Hungarian markets aodel slaughter-house should be constructed according tqLe latest principles of sanitary science. Close to Belgrade,ther on the banks of the Save or of the Danube, there isi abundance of vacant space admirably suited for such aurpose. Here shambles made mainly with iTon’and glass,athed in daylight and sunlight, with double ventilating)ofs, could be constructed. Of course, there would be goodtboratories for bacteriological research and microscopicalxamination. With such measures and precautions theproducts might attract many purchasers by reason of theecurity which enlightened scientific and State control wouldnsure. Is it now too late for such arguments to be appliedt Chicago ? " It is obvious that much trouble might have)een saved if the arguments as suggested had been appliedLt the Chicago stockyards. According to the Daily Mail,ihe imports of tinned meats to the Albert Docks, London,rom Boston and New Orleans, which consist of Chicagoproducts, amounted in June, 1905, to 27,000 cases; buthere were only 4000 cases in June, 1908. In July, 1905,24,000 cases came over; but in July this year not a singlecase was landed. Not only, however, is the Chicago tradewith England thus falling off but it has been stated in severalpapers that Servia is going to enter the lists as a competingpower. According to the Neace Freie Presse English capitalistsare expected to come to the rescue of Servia in the difficultieswhich arise as a consequence of the constant conflict betweenthat small State and her powerful neighbour Austria. When-ever Servia fails to bow to the exigencies of Austrian

diplomacy some form of cattle disease and swine plague isfound to prevail and the Austro-Hungarian frontier is-closed to the Servian hogs or cattle. The principal tradeof the country is thus paralysed. Therefore it would be a,great advantage for Servia to do its own slaughtering ofbeasts and to preserve and to pack its own meat. For thesereasons it is stated that a group of English capitalists areabout to visit Belgrade with the view of making arrangementsso as to found a new stockyard and packing town near Bel-grade. Certainly there is an opening for the creation of thisindustry on scientific lines, the first object being to providefood products in such a manner that so sort of suspicion asto their wholesomeness could arise. This the Servian Statemight have undertaken to its own profit, direct and indirect,without interfering with any vested interest, for these do notexist in that somewhat primitive country. It would be

difficult in making the attempt to find a better moment-abetter psychological moment, as Prince Bismarck wouldhave said-than the present. But the Servian Government,

, in its eagerness to secure such assistance as may reduce