The Link Between Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

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The link between job satisfaction and organizational commitment, Greek provate and public sector, International Public Management Journal

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    This article was downloaded by: [Aston University]On: 23 May 2010Access details: Access Details: [subscription number 773506545]Publisher RoutledgeInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

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    The Link Between Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment:Differences Between Public and Private Sector EmployeesYannis Markovits a; Ann J. Davis a; Doris Fay b;Rolf van Dick ca ASTON UNIVERSITY, b UNIVERSITY OF POTSDAM, c GOETHE UNIVERSITY,

    Online publication date: 20 May 2010

    To cite this Article Markovits, Yannis , Davis, Ann J. , Fay, Doris andDick, Rolf van(2010) 'The Link Between JobSatisfaction and Organizational Commitment: Differences Between Public and Private Sector Employees', InternationalPublic Management Journal, 13: 2, 177 196To link to this Article: DOI: 10.1080/10967491003756682URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10967491003756682

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  • THE LINK BETWEEN JOB SATISFACTION ANDORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT: DIFFERENCES

    BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYEES

    YANNIS MARKOVITS AND ANN J. DAVIS

    ASTON UNIVERSITY

    DORIS FAY

    UNIVERSITY OF POTSDAM

    ROLF VAN DICK

    GOETHE UNIVERSITY

    ABSTRACT: Employees in the public and private sectors experience different workingconditions and employment relationships. Therefore, it can be assumed that their

    attitudes toward their job and organizations, and relationships between them, are differ-

    ent. The existing literature has identified the relationship between organizational com-

    mitment and job satisfaction as interesting in this context. The present field study

    examines the satisfactioncommitment link with respect to differences between private

    and public sector employees. A sample of 617 Greek employees (257 from the private

    sector and 360 from the public sector) completed standardized questionnaires. Results

    confirmed the hypothesized relationship differences: Extrinsic satisfaction and intrinsic

    satisfaction are more strongly related to affective commitment and normative commit-

    ment for public sector employees than for private sector ones. The results are discussed,

    limitations are considered, and directions for future research are proposed.

    INTRODUCTION

    Organizational commitment is an important and widely researched concept inboth organizational behavior and human resources management. It has beendemonstrated to have substantial and meaningful relationships with a number of

    InternationalPublicManagementJournal

    International Public Management Journal, 13(2), pages 177196 Copyright # 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLCDOI: 10.1080/10967491003756682 ISSN: 1096-7494 print /1559-3169 online

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  • organizationally relevant outcomes, including trust, morale, turnover intentions, andabsenteeism (e.g., Brief 1998; for a recent meta-analysis, see Meyer et al. 2002).Organizational commitment is defined as the strength of an individuals identifi-cation with and involvement in a particular organization. It is characterized bythe belief in and acceptance of organizational goals and values, the willingness toexert effort on behalf of the organization, and a desire to maintain membershipin the organization (Mowday, Steers, and Porter 1979; Mowday, Porter, andSteers 1982). Over the last twenty years, many studies have established relation-ships both with other attitudes, with behavioral intentions (focal and discretion-ary), and with behavior, such as job performance and turnover. It has beenconceptualized variously as a unidimensional or a multidimensional attitudinalvariable (e.g., Allen and Meyer 1990; Buchanan 1974; Cook and Wall 1980;Cooper-Hakim and Viswesvaran 2005; Mowday et al. 1982; Mowday et al. 1979;Salancik 1977).Recent theorizing and empirical research have recognized that the meaning of

    organizational commitment differs depending on the organizational context andenvironment in which it is assessed. For example, private sector employees have,on average, organizational and job attitudes that are different from those of publicsector employees (Karl and Sutton 1998; Naff and Crum 1999; Kelman 2007). Thus,organizational commitment is expected to be different in its nature and meaning indifferent organizational settings as well as in different cultural environments(Clugston, Howell, and Dorfman 2000; Kirkman and Shapiro 2001; Smith, Fischer,and Sale 2001). This study seeks to enhance understanding in this area by exploringthe relationship between organizational commitment and job satisfaction, one of themost powerful predictors of organizational commitment, in public and private sectorcontexts.According to Spector (1997, 2), job satisfaction refers to how people feel about

    their jobs and different aspects of their jobs. It is the extent to which people like(satisfaction) or dislike (dissatisfaction) their jobs. It is an attitudinal variable thathas been explored both as an overall evaluation of the job and as a cluster ofattitudes relating to different aspects of the job. We take the position that job satis-faction has two dimensions, namely extrinsic satisfaction (e.g., satisfaction withpay, physical conditions, policies, and procedures) and intrinsic satisfaction (e.g.,satisfaction with creativity, achievement and accomplishment; cf. Cooper-Hakimand Viswesvaran 2005).The importance of job satisfaction and its relationship with organizational com-

    mitment has been acknowledged for many years. Meyer et al.s (2002) meta-analysisand Briefs (1998) work on attitudes provide substantial insight into this relationship.We propose that reciprocal relationships exist between forms of organizationalcommitment and elements of job satisfaction. A satisfied and happy employee tendsto be committed to the organization, returning back to the organization this positiveaffect via commitment and the concomitant organizationally relevant outcomesidentified earlier (for a detailed analysis of reciprocity norms, see Bergman 2006;Rhoades, Eisenberger, and Armeli 2001). This position is supported by studies byCramer (1996), Delobbe and Vandenberghe (2000), Meyer et al. (2002), Yilmaz

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  • (2002), and Yousef (2001; 2002) and was also demonstrated in quantitative andqualitative reviews (e.g., Riketta and van Dick 2005; 2009).The present study examines the effect of the organizational context, specifically pub-

    lic versus private sector employment, on the relationship between job satisfaction (seenas a predictor variable) and organizational commitment (seen as a dependent variable).

    PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYEES

    Research on the distinctive features of private and public sector organizations canbe found in organizational behavior and management studies, as well as in work andorganizational psychology research. These studies exemplify the differences betweenthe sectors organizational contexts which influence the attitudes and work behaviorsof managers and employees alike (Boyne 2002; Cho and Lee 2001; Goulet and Frank2002). Alternatively, they raise or examine methodological and research questionsderiving from the similarities and differences observed between private and publicsector organizations (Rainey and Bozeman 2000). However, only a few studies havelooked into either job satisfaction or organizational commitment with respect to theform and type of employment.This section first reviews the literature on job satisfaction and organizational com-

    mitment in the private and public sectors. It continues with a brief review of researchon the Greek organizational and cultural context. Finally, we will focus on publicsector employees, looking at possible explanations for reported lower levels of jobsatisfaction and organizational commitment compared to private sector employees.

    Job Satisfaction

    Solomon (1986), in the Israeli context, argues that the existence of and clear con-nections between performance-based rewards, on the one hand, and policies intend-ing to promote efficiency, on the other, make private sector managers more satisfiedwith their jobs than public sector managers, where such linkage is much less apparent.Karl and Sutton (1998) support the view that private sector employees place morevalue on high wages, while public sector employees place more value on interestingwork. Naff and Crum (1999) argue that private sector empl

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