1
205 was omitted from the last number of our Journal; and if any medical student, in con- sequence of not having seen it in our columns, omitted to make a registration of his name, we feel confident that if he forthwith attend at the college, and make a representation to that effect, he will not be allowed to suffer any inconvenience in consequence of the accident. THE LICENTIATES OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS. To the Editor of THE LANCET. Sir,-Your ready insertion of my note of last week induces me to address you once more, on another subject, not remotely con- nected with medical reform. The licentiates of the College of Physi- cians are, doubtless, a degraded set of men- have undoubtedly great reason to complain of the treatment to which they have been and are subjected. Not one word in the orations delivered before the British Medical Asso- ciation last year,by Dr. Marshall Hall, and this year by Professor Grant, is too severe, in reference to the treatment they have received. But, Sir, the point to which I beg, through the medium of THE LANCET, to call public attention is this. Degraded as the licentiates are, by the conduct of the fellows of the College of Physicians, they are at least as degraded by their own. When and where have they, by a steady, steadfast union and co-operation, made their cause known to the proper authorities? When and where has been their energetic agitation of the question of their rights? Even now, that the British Medical Asso- ciation-that association so exalted in its aims, dignified in its course, under the direc- tion of its able president, and daily rising into such power and importance-affords them the opportunity, do they embrace that opportunity ? One only licentiate belonged to that association. He, being now a fellow, is the only one still to be found pleading the licentiates’ cause. Truly, the licentiates re- mind me of the waggoner and Jupiter. If they would only nobly combine, and put their shoulders to the wheel-one and all-at this crisis especially-they would not long remain licentiates ! / But if the fellows are haughty despots, the licentiates are mean sycophants. They de- serve their humiliation. It becomes them admirably. Oh, I would stir those gentlemen up to a sense of their degradation, their self-degra- dation-and to a sense of their power. Let them unite in their just cause. Let them with one voice-never, never to be stilled until they obtain them-demand their rights. Let them no longer creep, or rather crawl, at the feet of the fellows, until these may please to take pity on them. No. But let them pursue a nobler course,-join the band which is united to obtain justice for all ranks of the profession. Then, and only then, will they deserve, and, deserving, achieve their eman- cipation from their humiliation and thraldom. I speak, Sir, especially to the graduates of Edinburgh, myself a member of that univer- sity, and I call upon them to disgrace their Alma Mater no longer, by their supineness, their submission, their mean expectancy ! To the two hundred and seventy licentiates, and the seventy-six extra-licentiates (accord- ing to the college list for 1840), I make this appeal, and I say-emulate the conduct of Stanger and of Wells-join the band of true reformers, against your one hundred and thirty-two oppressors, and-BE MEN ! am, Sir, your obedient servant, CENSOR. London, Nov. 2,1841. "A LOOKER-ON " TO DR. HITCH. To the Editor of THE LANCET. SiR,-The playfulness of Dr. Hitch’s re- ply, proves him to be more of the knight than the clown, and fitter to poise the lance than brandish the cudgel ; and whilst I ac- cept in the true spirit of knighthood his proffered courtesy, and admire the gallantry with which he declines to shrink from opi- nions expressed in a private letter, notwith- standing his annoyance at their improper publication, I greatly regret that he declines my challenge. It is contrary to all the laws of chivalry, to require a knight to raise his beaver who enters the lists with it closed ; ; and the name and reputation of Dr. Hitch would be advantage enough against the pre- tensions of a nameless knight, without the additional knowledge of its utter insignifi- cance. But the" Looker-on" still hopes to draw from Dr. Hitch for the public use, if not in the shape of controversy in some more wef- come form, some portion of his great and useful experience in the noble cause in which we are both engaged. There cannot be a more fitting opportunity than his next annual report of the state of the Gloucester Asylum ; and I trust ere that period shall arrive, he will have matured and practically established the great improvements he has now in progress. I am, Sir, your obedient servant, A LOOKER-ON. October 27, 1841.

THE LICENTIATES OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS

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Page 1: THE LICENTIATES OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS

205

was omitted from the last number of our

Journal; and if any medical student, in con-sequence of not having seen it in our columns,omitted to make a registration of his name,we feel confident that if he forthwith attendat the college, and make a representation tothat effect, he will not be allowed to sufferany inconvenience in consequence of the

accident.

THE LICENTIATES

OF THE

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.

Sir,-Your ready insertion of my note oflast week induces me to address you oncemore, on another subject, not remotely con-nected with medical reform.The licentiates of the College of Physi-

cians are, doubtless, a degraded set of men-have undoubtedly great reason to complainof the treatment to which they have been andare subjected. Not one word in the orationsdelivered before the British Medical Asso-ciation last year,by Dr. Marshall Hall, andthis year by Professor Grant, is too severe,in reference to the treatment they havereceived.

But, Sir, the point to which I beg, throughthe medium of THE LANCET, to call publicattention is this. Degraded as the licentiatesare, by the conduct of the fellows of the

College of Physicians, they are at least asdegraded by their own. When and wherehave they, by a steady, steadfast union andco-operation, made their cause known to theproper authorities? When and where hasbeen their energetic agitation of the questionof their rights?Even now, that the British Medical Asso-

ciation-that association so exalted in its

aims, dignified in its course, under the direc-tion of its able president, and daily risinginto such power and importance-affordsthem the opportunity, do they embrace thatopportunity ? One only licentiate belonged tothat association. He, being now a fellow, isthe only one still to be found pleading thelicentiates’ cause. Truly, the licentiates re-mind me of the waggoner and Jupiter. If

they would only nobly combine, and put theirshoulders to the wheel-one and all-at thiscrisis especially-they would not long remainlicentiates ! /

But if the fellows are haughty despots, thelicentiates are mean sycophants. They de-serve their humiliation. It becomes themadmirably.

Oh, I would stir those gentlemen up to asense of their degradation, their self-degra-dation-and to a sense of their power. Letthem unite in their just cause. Let them

with one voice-never, never to be stilleduntil they obtain them-demand their rights.Let them no longer creep, or rather crawl, atthe feet of the fellows, until these may pleaseto take pity on them. No. But let thempursue a nobler course,-join the band whichis united to obtain justice for all ranks of theprofession. Then, and only then, will theydeserve, and, deserving, achieve their eman-cipation from their humiliation and thraldom.

I speak, Sir, especially to the graduates ofEdinburgh, myself a member of that univer-sity, and I call upon them to disgrace theirAlma Mater no longer, by their supineness,their submission, their mean expectancy !To the two hundred and seventy licentiates,

and the seventy-six extra-licentiates (accord-ing to the college list for 1840), I make thisappeal, and I say-emulate the conduct ofStanger and of Wells-join the band of truereformers, against your one hundred andthirty-two oppressors, and-BE MEN ! am,Sir, your obedient servant,

CENSOR.

London, Nov. 2,1841.

"A LOOKER-ON " TO DR. HITCH.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SiR,-The playfulness of Dr. Hitch’s re-ply, proves him to be more of the knightthan the clown, and fitter to poise the lancethan brandish the cudgel ; and whilst I ac-cept in the true spirit of knighthood hisproffered courtesy, and admire the gallantrywith which he declines to shrink from opi-nions expressed in a private letter, notwith-standing his annoyance at their improperpublication, I greatly regret that he declinesmy challenge. It is contrary to all the lawsof chivalry, to require a knight to raise hisbeaver who enters the lists with it closed ; ;and the name and reputation of Dr. Hitchwould be advantage enough against the pre-tensions of a nameless knight, without theadditional knowledge of its utter insignifi-cance.

But the" Looker-on" still hopes to drawfrom Dr. Hitch for the public use, if not inthe shape of controversy in some more wef-come form, some portion of his great anduseful experience in the noble cause inwhich we are both engaged. There cannotbe a more fitting opportunity than his nextannual report of the state of the GloucesterAsylum ; and I trust ere that period shallarrive, he will have matured and practicallyestablished the great improvements he hasnow in progress. I am, Sir, your obedientservant,

A LOOKER-ON.October 27, 1841.