1
566 profession who are somewhat similarly circumstanced, or as an individual to usurp the functions of the Board, as would have appeared by the uncorrected report of his speech. LORD ROSEBERY. WE are glad to say that the Premier is now practically recovered from his attack of influenza, but the sleeplessness is still extreme, and so in some measure retards his progress to recovery. The attack has been from the first of an asthenic character, but not otherwise severe; there have been no complications. On Wednesday his lordship was able to see his private secretary for the first time since his illness and give him a few directions, but he is still quite unfit to transact-any public business. DIPHTHERIA IN LONDON. DURING the two weeks ended last Saturday the deaths from diphtheria in London have maintained a steady decline i on recent preceding weeks-namely, 27, or 4 below the corrected average, in the week ended Feb. 16th, against 29, 45, and 34 in the three weeks immediately precedent; followed by 29 last week, a number still below the corrected average by 2. Of the total of 56 deaths in the two weeks, 36 were in children aged from one to five 3ears, this being 64 per cent. of the total. Of the 56, Poplar is credited with 6, as is also Camberwell, Greenwich with 5, St. Pancras and Battersea each with 4, Plumstead with 3, and Paddington, Islington, and Hackney each with 2 deaths. In Greater London in the fortnight there were 17 registered deaths from the disease, of which 8 belonged to West Ham and 2 each to Edmonton and Brentford districts. "THE LAW’S DELAYS" IN VACCINATION. IT has in time past been repeatedly, and with good reason, asserted that radical changes are called for in regard to the administration of the law of vaccination. One of the changes should assuredly be to vest local health bodies with the powers now vested in the guardians of the poor. An instance of the folly of the present system is recorded in the report of Dr. Wm. Brown, the health officer of the Stapleton urban district, as having occurred during the past year. Small-pox having been imported into the district, the patient was promptly removed to hospital on receipt of the certifi- cate of notification. But meanwhile four persons resident in the invaded house had been exposed to the risk of the intrcduced infection, and the fact of their need of revaccina- tion was accordingly at once made known to the Barton Regis Poor-law body as the " vaccination authority." Nevertheless, eight days later no action had been taken towards administer- ing the needed prophylactic, because, forsooth, "it was not the month for vaccination." Dr. Brown hereupon himself, at his own cost, procured calf lymph and performed the operations, but too late to avert danger, as two of the four inmates contracted small-pox. Dr. Brown, like many another medical officer of health in like case, took upon him a duty imposed by law upon other authorities in his efforts to stay the spread of a disease by the best-known remedy, and one which could have been promptly administered in legal fashion by the officers of the board of guardians-it may be to the prevention, almost to certainty, of the two cases of small-pox which developed in the house. Ample powers are granted to Poor-law bodies for immediate action in emergent circum- stances like the one in question ; and the excuse for in- action which Dr. Brown chronicles only serves to exaggerate the neglect displayed. Only when the State remedies for the prevention and stay of disease are in the hands of the bodies charged with the function of safeguarding the public health can we hope to see prompt and efficient measures adopted. The need for prompt revaccination in such cases as the above is often recognised by the sanitary authority which indemnifies the medical officer for carrying it out; and surely, if this be so, in time of epidemic it would naturally fall to thE duty of the guardians of public health to supervise vaccina tion in general, as a potent safeguard to the community. AN AMATEUR. Miss MARGARET Lucy TYLER of Pymmes Park, Edmonton, is a fortunate woman. A baby of eighteen months being ill was confided to her untutored care ; she prescribed for it and it died. We say that Miss Tyler is a fortunate woman, for although it appears that she meddled in the grossest way with what did not concern her, and with what she could not pos- sibly understand, it does not appear that she actually gave the unfortunate child anything that could do it any harm. The evidence of the practitioner who had seen the child before it fell under Miss Tyler’s medical care proved that the lady’s prescriptions were harmless, and so saved her from an exceedingly awkward position ; but we hope that the sad issue of the case will keep Miss Tyler from dabbling in medicine, lest her next appearance in a coroner’s court be less agreeable to her. - THE DIFFUSION OF SMALL-POX. SMALL-POX last week showed some disposition towards recrudescence in the metropolis, where 21 fresh cases were recorded, the major portion of them being, however, due to the renewed prevalence of the disease in the parish of Marylebone. The sanitary officials have been severely handicapped in that parish by the occurrence of cases in crowded localities and under circumstances which have put all their well-laid plans for dealing with the disease in the background, for the reason that occurrences have remained unnotified, and therefore un- removed, with consequent resulting danger to surrounding populations. The single death from small-pox in London last week was in an unvaccinated infant belonging to Mary- lebone. Elsewhere in the metropolis there is nothing to report of any moment. The removals to the institutions of the Metropolitan Asylums Board during the week numbered 19, against 21, 18, and 18 iia the preceding three weeks; whilst at the close of the week the patients remaining under isolation were 75, the number having been steadily increasing since the week ended Dec. 22nd, when it was 15, four weeks later it was 32, and four weeks still later 67. In the remainder of the country the news is much more reassuring, there having been only a case or two at Birmingham and a few other midland towns, and three or four attacks and one death registered at Derby. In Lancashire we hear of a small invasion at Burnley and of a case or two at Liverpool ; but the provinces just now appear to be fairly free from the disease. At Edinburgh some dozen cases have been reported in the second week of February. In Dublin in the same week some slight de- crease in the admissions to hospital was manifested, these having fallen from 64, 69, and 60 in the preceding three weeks to 56, the discharge, however, showing no corresponding increase ; whilst the patients left in hospital at the close of the week were 149 in number, in addition to 115 convalescents at Kilmainham, making a total of 264, a decline on previous totals. Of the 8 deaths in the week, 3 were in vaccinated and 3 in unvaccinated adulte, no statement being forthcoming as to the condition as to vaccination of the remaining deceased persons. - THE next meeting of the Pathological Society of Lordon will be devoted to a discussion upon the Bacteriology and Pathological Chemistry of Diphtheria and its Antitoxin. The subject will be introduced by Dr. Bertram Hunt. Several

“THE LAW'S DELAYS” IN VACCINATION

  • Upload
    duongtu

  • View
    219

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: “THE LAW'S DELAYS” IN VACCINATION

566

profession who are somewhat similarly circumstanced, or as

an individual to usurp the functions of the Board, as wouldhave appeared by the uncorrected report of his speech.

LORD ROSEBERY.

WE are glad to say that the Premier is now practicallyrecovered from his attack of influenza, but the sleeplessnessis still extreme, and so in some measure retards his progressto recovery. The attack has been from the first of anasthenic character, but not otherwise severe; there havebeen no complications. On Wednesday his lordship was ableto see his private secretary for the first time since his illnessand give him a few directions, but he is still quite unfit totransact-any public business.

DIPHTHERIA IN LONDON.

DURING the two weeks ended last Saturday the deaths from diphtheria in London have maintained a steady decline ion recent preceding weeks-namely, 27, or 4 below thecorrected average, in the week ended Feb. 16th, against29, 45, and 34 in the three weeks immediately precedent;followed by 29 last week, a number still below the correctedaverage by 2. Of the total of 56 deaths in the two weeks, 36were in children aged from one to five 3ears, this being64 per cent. of the total. Of the 56, Poplar is creditedwith 6, as is also Camberwell, Greenwich with 5, St.Pancras and Battersea each with 4, Plumstead with 3, andPaddington, Islington, and Hackney each with 2 deaths. InGreater London in the fortnight there were 17 registereddeaths from the disease, of which 8 belonged to West Hamand 2 each to Edmonton and Brentford districts.

"THE LAW’S DELAYS" IN VACCINATION.

IT has in time past been repeatedly, and with good reason,asserted that radical changes are called for in regard to theadministration of the law of vaccination. One of the

changes should assuredly be to vest local health bodies withthe powers now vested in the guardians of the poor. An

instance of the folly of the present system is recorded in thereport of Dr. Wm. Brown, the health officer of the Stapletonurban district, as having occurred during the past year.Small-pox having been imported into the district, the patientwas promptly removed to hospital on receipt of the certifi-cate of notification. But meanwhile four persons residentin the invaded house had been exposed to the risk of theintrcduced infection, and the fact of their need of revaccina-tion was accordingly at once made known to the Barton RegisPoor-law body as the " vaccination authority." Nevertheless,eight days later no action had been taken towards administer-ing the needed prophylactic, because, forsooth, "it was notthe month for vaccination." Dr. Brown hereupon himself,at his own cost, procured calf lymph and performed theoperations, but too late to avert danger, as two of the fourinmates contracted small-pox. Dr. Brown, like many anothermedical officer of health in like case, took upon him a dutyimposed by law upon other authorities in his efforts to stay thespread of a disease by the best-known remedy, and one whichcould have been promptly administered in legal fashion

by the officers of the board of guardians-it may be to theprevention, almost to certainty, of the two cases of small-poxwhich developed in the house. Ample powers are grantedto Poor-law bodies for immediate action in emergent circum-stances like the one in question ; and the excuse for in-

action which Dr. Brown chronicles only serves to exaggeratethe neglect displayed. Only when the State remedies forthe prevention and stay of disease are in the hands of thebodies charged with the function of safeguarding the publichealth can we hope to see prompt and efficient measuresadopted. The need for prompt revaccination in such cases as

the above is often recognised by the sanitary authority whichindemnifies the medical officer for carrying it out; and surely,if this be so, in time of epidemic it would naturally fall to thEduty of the guardians of public health to supervise vaccina

tion in general, as a potent safeguard to the community.AN AMATEUR.

Miss MARGARET Lucy TYLER of Pymmes Park, Edmonton,is a fortunate woman. A baby of eighteen months being illwas confided to her untutored care ; she prescribed for it andit died. We say that Miss Tyler is a fortunate woman, foralthough it appears that she meddled in the grossest way withwhat did not concern her, and with what she could not pos-sibly understand, it does not appear that she actually gave theunfortunate child anything that could do it any harm. Theevidence of the practitioner who had seen the child before itfell under Miss Tyler’s medical care proved that the lady’sprescriptions were harmless, and so saved her from an

exceedingly awkward position ; but we hope that the sadissue of the case will keep Miss Tyler from dabbling inmedicine, lest her next appearance in a coroner’s court beless agreeable to her.

-

THE DIFFUSION OF SMALL-POX.

SMALL-POX last week showed some disposition towardsrecrudescence in the metropolis, where 21 fresh cases wererecorded, the major portion of them being, however, due tothe renewed prevalence of the disease in the parish of

Marylebone. The sanitary officials have been severelyhandicapped in that parish by the occurrence of cases

in crowded localities and under circumstances whichhave put all their well-laid plans for dealing withthe disease in the background, for the reason thatoccurrences have remained unnotified, and therefore un-

removed, with consequent resulting danger to surroundingpopulations. The single death from small-pox in Londonlast week was in an unvaccinated infant belonging to Mary-lebone. Elsewhere in the metropolis there is nothing toreport of any moment. The removals to the institutions of

the Metropolitan Asylums Board during the week numbered19, against 21, 18, and 18 iia the preceding three weeks;whilst at the close of the week the patients remainingunder isolation were 75, the number having been steadilyincreasing since the week ended Dec. 22nd, when it

was 15, four weeks later it was 32, and four weeksstill later 67. In the remainder of the country the newsis much more reassuring, there having been only a caseor two at Birmingham and a few other midland towns, andthree or four attacks and one death registered at Derby.In Lancashire we hear of a small invasion at Burnley andof a case or two at Liverpool ; but the provinces just nowappear to be fairly free from the disease. At Edinburgh somedozen cases have been reported in the second week of

February. In Dublin in the same week some slight de-crease in the admissions to hospital was manifested, thesehaving fallen from 64, 69, and 60 in the preceding threeweeks to 56, the discharge, however, showing no correspondingincrease ; whilst the patients left in hospital at the close ofthe week were 149 in number, in addition to 115 convalescentsat Kilmainham, making a total of 264, a decline on previoustotals. Of the 8 deaths in the week, 3 were in vaccinatedand 3 in unvaccinated adulte, no statement being forthcomingas to the condition as to vaccination of the remainingdeceased persons.

-

THE next meeting of the Pathological Society of Lordonwill be devoted to a discussion upon the Bacteriology andPathological Chemistry of Diphtheria and its Antitoxin. The

subject will be introduced by Dr. Bertram Hunt. Several