of 1 /1
1704 almost primeval insanitation" and that in the grea majority of rural districts local sanitary administration a mere pretence." The Vaccination Act continues, fo: reasons beyond Dr. Elkington’s control, to be a dead letter The infectious diseases notified from July 1st, 1906, t( June 30th, 1907, after deducting all unsubstantiated cases comprised 299 cases of typhoid fever, 12 of scarlet fever 126 of diphtheria, and 15 of puerperal fever. A simplE method of obtaining a constant and pure water-suppl3 where no springs or streams are available is practised ir some of the drier parts of Southern Tasmania and deserve! to be known. Rain is collected on a sufficient area of gal. vanised iron which is laid on supports on a convenient slope wired off from access by animals and furnished with gutters leading to storage tanks of suitable capacity. THE INSTITUTE OF ST. PETERSBURG CORPORATION MEDICAL MEN. THE Novoe Vremya has an interesting note on the history of the Institute of St. Petersburg Corporation Medical Men, saying that during the outbreak of scarlet fever and diph- theria 25 years ago this institute was formed with 16 medical men, which number during the 25 years of its existence has been increased to 36. Their duties are to attend profession- ally the poor of the town afflicted with infectious diseases. In these 25 years these medical men have attended 5,000,000 cases free of charge. The journal closes the notice with a list of the six survivors of the original members. THE BRISTOL ROYAL INFIRMARY AND THE PLURALITY OF HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS. IN our issue of Nov. 30th we gave the main points of the amended rule which had been proposed for the direction of the honorary medical staff of the Bristol Royal Infirmary as to its members holding other appointments. This amended rule had been drawn up owing to the resistance put forward to the original new rule, upon which we commented in our issue of Oct. 12th, p. 1031. The staff accepted the amended rule and it was confirmed by a meeting of the infirmary com- mittee held on Nov. 26 the. To be valid the rule had still- to receive the sanction of the governors of the infirmary and a meeting of the governors was specially convened for Dec. 5th. There was a very large attendance of governors and Sir George White, president :of the infirmary, presided. The proceedings were both amicable and business-like. The new rule was proposed by Mr. J. N. C. Pope and seconded by the Rev. Dr. Glover in speeches of commendable brevity; the motion was put and carried unanimously. The President thanked the governors for having come in such large numbers to a meeting which they knew " was very largely a formal proceeding," and Mr. G. Monro Scott, in moving a vote of thanks to the chairman, said that he thought that the way in which both parties had shown themselves willing to meet half-way proved that they both had the interests of the infirmary at heart. We can but repeat our satisfaction at the matter having been amicably settled and also that the settlement was in great measure due to the firm and united front shown not only by the medical staff of the infirmary but also by the local medical men. Hospital governors and committees are as a rule composed of sensible persons who if they do make mistakes upon medical matters are generally quite open to conviction if the right way is put before them. THE Secretary of State for India has forwarded a letter to the 11 professors of bacteriology, pathology, hygiene, and tropical medicine whose prompt and prominent action in defending Mr. W. M. HafEkine both in our columns and elsewhere with regard to that gentleman’s connexion i with the Mulkowal disaster has done so much to bring a most unfortunate dispute to a speedy con- , clusion honourable to all parties. The letter states, as we announced in our issue of Nov. 30th, that Mr. Morley has recognised the fact that an important body of scientific opinion was in Mr. Haffkine’s favour and that he has found nothing in the oft-related circumstances to prevent him from offering to Mr. HafEkine further employment in India. Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin John Hunter, Army Medical Reserve, and Dr. Charles James Sutherland have been promoted from Honorary Associates to Knights of Grace of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England. - A TELEGRAM from the Governor of the Mauritius received at the Colonial Office on Dec. 6th states that for the week ending Dec. 5th there were six cases of plague reported and three deaths from the disease. Mr. John Cosmo Stuart Rashleigh, M.D. Cantab., has been nominated to serve the office of sheriff of the county of Cornwall. Looking Back. FROM THE LANCET, SATURDAY, Dec. 12th, 1829. CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF IRIS. THE April Number of Hecker’s Annalen, contains the case of a child two years old, in which this malformation was observed, the occurrence of which has been repeatedly called in question. Caroline S., born in 1826, evinced, from the first days of her life, an extraordinary intolerance of light ; the mother examined the eyes of the child, but could not find anything unusual in them, except that they were of a dull-black colour. In May, 1827, she was, for the first time, seen by the reporter, Dr. Behr, who, on close inspection, convinced himself of the total want of the iris in both eyes ; in other respects they appeared to be of normal formation, except that the corneæ were a little more convex than usual; the upper eyelids tumid, and the eyebrows very thin ; light had become more tolerable; the movements of the eyes were, however, still very rapid and irregular until September 1828, when they became more steady ; the eyes were all this time, in other respects, quite healthy, but the intolerance of light continued. It appeared as if the little girl felt somewhat more comfortable in the evening, and she was able to dis- tinguish objects even in complete darkness, but seemed to like bright colours, as red and yellow, more than others; whenever she was going to examine very small objects, she placed them very near her eyes, somewhat below the axis of vision and she appeared to experience some uneasiness when she was looking upwards, especially in a bright light. If the child was placed in a dark room, and rays of light were made to fall on her eyes, they assumed a sort of reddish phosphorescence, like rubies or burning coals. The other senses were perfectly natural. LONGEVITY.-The Belfast Evening Telegraph of Dec. 5th states that Mrs. Margaret McGurk of Carrickmore, county Tyrone, is now over 107 years of age. She was married 84 years ago and became a widow 11 years after- wards. She is the caretaker of Carrickmore Dispensary and courthouse, and moreover earns something by spinning wool. Her appearance as shown in a photograph reproduced by the same journal is not that of a person bowed down by weight of years.-Captain Alexander Tweedale, late of the 1st Bombay Lancers, died at 81, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, London, on Dec. 7th, in his 102nd year. Captain Tweedale’s coni- mission as captain in the Indian army was dated March 6th, 1841.

THE INSTITUTE OF ST. PETERSBURG CORPORATION MEDICAL MEN

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: THE INSTITUTE OF ST. PETERSBURG CORPORATION MEDICAL MEN

1704

almost primeval insanitation" and that in the grea

majority of rural districts local sanitary administration a mere pretence." The Vaccination Act continues, fo:reasons beyond Dr. Elkington’s control, to be a dead letterThe infectious diseases notified from July 1st, 1906, t(

June 30th, 1907, after deducting all unsubstantiated casescomprised 299 cases of typhoid fever, 12 of scarlet fever126 of diphtheria, and 15 of puerperal fever. A simplEmethod of obtaining a constant and pure water-suppl3where no springs or streams are available is practised irsome of the drier parts of Southern Tasmania and deserve!to be known. Rain is collected on a sufficient area of gal.vanised iron which is laid on supports on a convenient slopewired off from access by animals and furnished with guttersleading to storage tanks of suitable capacity.

THE INSTITUTE OF ST. PETERSBURG

CORPORATION MEDICAL MEN.

THE Novoe Vremya has an interesting note on the historyof the Institute of St. Petersburg Corporation Medical Men,saying that during the outbreak of scarlet fever and diph-theria 25 years ago this institute was formed with 16 medicalmen, which number during the 25 years of its existence hasbeen increased to 36. Their duties are to attend profession-ally the poor of the town afflicted with infectious diseases.In these 25 years these medical men have attended 5,000,000cases free of charge. The journal closes the notice with alist of the six survivors of the original members.

THE BRISTOL ROYAL INFIRMARY ANDTHE PLURALITY OF HOSPITAL

APPOINTMENTS.

IN our issue of Nov. 30th we gave the main points of theamended rule which had been proposed for the direction ofthe honorary medical staff of the Bristol Royal Infirmary asto its members holding other appointments. This amendedrule had been drawn up owing to the resistance put forwardto the original new rule, upon which we commented in ourissue of Oct. 12th, p. 1031. The staff accepted the amendedrule and it was confirmed by a meeting of the infirmary com-mittee held on Nov. 26 the. To be valid the rule had still- toreceive the sanction of the governors of the infirmary and ameeting of the governors was specially convened for Dec. 5th.There was a very large attendance of governors and Sir

George White, president :of the infirmary, presided. The

proceedings were both amicable and business-like. Thenew rule was proposed by Mr. J. N. C. Pope and secondedby the Rev. Dr. Glover in speeches of commendable brevity;the motion was put and carried unanimously. The Presidentthanked the governors for having come in such largenumbers to a meeting which they knew " was very largely aformal proceeding," and Mr. G. Monro Scott, in moving avote of thanks to the chairman, said that he thought that theway in which both parties had shown themselves willing tomeet half-way proved that they both had the interests ofthe infirmary at heart. We can but repeat our satisfactionat the matter having been amicably settled and also that thesettlement was in great measure due to the firm and unitedfront shown not only by the medical staff of the infirmarybut also by the local medical men. Hospital governors andcommittees are as a rule composed of sensible persons whoif they do make mistakes upon medical matters are generallyquite open to conviction if the right way is put before them.

THE Secretary of State for India has forwarded a letter tothe 11 professors of bacteriology, pathology, hygiene, andtropical medicine whose prompt and prominent action in

defending Mr. W. M. HafEkine both in our columns andelsewhere with regard to that gentleman’s connexion

i with the Mulkowal disaster has done so much to

bring a most unfortunate dispute to a speedy con-, clusion honourable to all parties. The letter states, aswe announced in our issue of Nov. 30th, that Mr. Morley hasrecognised the fact that an important body of scientific

opinion was in Mr. Haffkine’s favour and that he has foundnothing in the oft-related circumstances to prevent him fromoffering to Mr. HafEkine further employment in India.

Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin John Hunter, Army MedicalReserve, and Dr. Charles James Sutherland have been

promoted from Honorary Associates to Knights of Grace ofthe Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in

England. -

A TELEGRAM from the Governor of the Mauritius receivedat the Colonial Office on Dec. 6th states that for the week

ending Dec. 5th there were six cases of plague reportedand three deaths from the disease.

Mr. John Cosmo Stuart Rashleigh, M.D. Cantab., has beennominated to serve the office of sheriff of the county ofCornwall.

Looking Back.FROM

THE LANCET, SATURDAY, Dec. 12th, 1829.

CONGENITAL ABSENCE OF IRIS.

THE April Number of Hecker’s Annalen, contains the caseof a child two years old, in which this malformation wasobserved, the occurrence of which has been repeatedlycalled in question.

Caroline S., born in 1826, evinced, from the first days ofher life, an extraordinary intolerance of light ; the motherexamined the eyes of the child, but could not find anythingunusual in them, except that they were of a dull-blackcolour. In May, 1827, she was, for the first time, seen bythe reporter, Dr. Behr, who, on close inspection, convincedhimself of the total want of the iris in both eyes ; in otherrespects they appeared to be of normal formation, exceptthat the corneæ were a little more convex than usual; theupper eyelids tumid, and the eyebrows very thin ; light hadbecome more tolerable; the movements of the eyes were,however, still very rapid and irregular until September 1828,when they became more steady ; the eyes were all this time,in other respects, quite healthy, but the intolerance of lightcontinued. It appeared as if the little girl felt somewhatmore comfortable in the evening, and she was able to dis-tinguish objects even in complete darkness, but seemed tolike bright colours, as red and yellow, more than others;whenever she was going to examine very small objects, sheplaced them very near her eyes, somewhat below the axis ofvision and she appeared to experience some uneasiness whenshe was looking upwards, especially in a bright light. If thechild was placed in a dark room, and rays of light weremade to fall on her eyes, they assumed a sort of reddishphosphorescence, like rubies or burning coals. The othersenses were perfectly natural.

LONGEVITY.-The Belfast Evening Telegraph ofDec. 5th states that Mrs. Margaret McGurk of Carrickmore,county Tyrone, is now over 107 years of age. She wasmarried 84 years ago and became a widow 11 years after-wards. She is the caretaker of Carrickmore Dispensary andcourthouse, and moreover earns something by spinning wool.Her appearance as shown in a photograph reproduced by thesame journal is not that of a person bowed down by weight ofyears.-Captain Alexander Tweedale, late of the 1st BombayLancers, died at 81, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, London,on Dec. 7th, in his 102nd year. Captain Tweedale’s coni-mission as captain in the Indian army was dated March 6th,1841.