of 1 /1
1752 be elected. The eight remaining candidates are Mr. HowsE, Sir WILLIAM DALBY, Mr. CLEMEDTT LUCAS, Mr. EDMUND OWEN, Mr. ANDREW CLARK, Mr. RICKMAN GODLBB, Mr. J. H. MORGAN, and Mr. WATSON CHEYNE. Mr. HOWSE has served one term and has done his work so well that it would be distinctly a loss to the College if he were not re-elected. Mr. CLEMENT LUCAS is a colleague of Mr. Howsa at Guy’s Hospital, and his election would increase to four the number of members of the Council derived from that school. This may not be an ideal arrangement, but it cannot be disputed that Mr. LucAS would decidedly prove a gain to the Council. Mr. RICKMAN GODLEE is a well-known surgeon attached to University College Hospital, and as one of the representatives from that hospital-namely, Mr. HEATH-is retiring from the Council, Mr. GODLEE might very fitly replace him. Mr. EDMUND OWEN is the senior surgeon to St. Mary’s Hospital, which is at present unrepresented on the Council ; we are inclined to think that Mr. OwEN’s sympathies are rather too conservative for him to assist adequately in the neces- sary progress of the College; but we do not doubt that, if elected, he would do his best to maintain the high character of the examinations. Mr. J. H. MORGAN has for a long time been an earnest advocate of necessary reforms in the College. He was one of the founders of the Association of Fellows, and was one of its honorary secre- taries in the early and more fruitful years of its exist- ence. He is well acquainted with the problems of medical education from his position at Charing-cross Hospital, and would, we feel sure, be a decided acquisition to the Council. Mr. WATSON CHEYNE is well known to a ’, large section of the medical public, and at the present time King’s College Hospital has no representative. Mr. ANDREW CLARK is hardly so suitable a candidate as several of the others, though he has had much to do with medical education at the Middlesex Hospital. Sir WILLIAM DALBY has done much good work, but perhaps he is not now quite in touch with our present day questions of education; and we may say in conclusion that in our opinion the candidates who would most satisfactorily assist in the work of the Council-surgical, educational, and ethical-are Mr. HowsE, Mr. LUCAS, Mr. GODLEE, Mr. BENNETT MAY, and Mr. MORGAN. I Annotations. "Ne quid nimis." THE DIAMOND JUBILEE HONOURS. THE medical profession has no reason to consider that it has been left in the cold in the distribution of Diamond Jubilee Honours. It is true that the greater part of the honours bestowed upon medicine were foregone conclusions, that is, they are either promotions in the orders reserved for official service or recognitions of high official place, but this is the character of the whole list, and has doubtless been deliberately maintained as the only possible course to be pursued on an occasion where so many diverse claims might I have been considered from a sentimental point of view. Dr. Wilks, the President of the Royal Collage of Physicians of London, receives the baronetcy which his eminent services to science and to the practical philanthropy of Guy’s Hospital so well merit. Sir William MacCormac, the President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, can also doubly justify his baronetcy, being a sound surgeon as well as a good organiser and a dignified official. Mr. Thomas Smith’s baronetcy will be exceedingly popular in the profession, where his operative skill is as widely recognised as are his amiable qualities. No harder working or more brilliant exponent of modern medicine, of medicine as an exact science rather than as an interesting art, could have been selected for knighthood than Dr. W. R. Gowers. If only all those members of the profession who have delighted in his treatises should recognise the honour given to the author, Sir William Gowers will receive as many congratulations as anyone in the list. There is a fitness about the bestowal of a knighthood upon Dr. Felix Semon, as he is a skilful exponent of a branch of medicine which has been born and has reached its present sturdy size entirely during the Victorian era. We are glad to see in the lists of new knights the names also of Dr. George F. Diffey, the President of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, and Mr. William Thomson, the head of the corre- sponding surgical corporation. Among the promotions in, or selections for, the Order of the Bath, we notice ;‘several well-known names-notably, Dr. Richard Thorne Thorne, who becomes K.C.B. (Civil); Inspector - Generals of Hos- pitals H. F. Norbury, J. J. L. Donnet, and H Macdonnel, and Surgeon-General C. A. Gordon: K.C.B. (Military); Dr. T. Grimshaw, Registrar - General of Ireland; Dr. David Nicolson, one of the Lord Chancellor’s Visitors in Lunacy ; Surgeon-Major-General J. Jameson, Director- General of the Army Medical Department, and Mr. Hugh Adcock, Consulting Physician to H.I.M. the Shah of Persia: C.B. (Civil) ; and Surgeon-Major-General C. Sib- thorpe and Brigade - Surgeon - Lieutenant - Colonel G. W. McNalty: C,B. (Military). Surgeon-Major.GeneralsW. R. Hooper, President of the Medical Board, India Office, and J. Cleghorn, Director-General of the Indian Medical Service, receive the honour of C.S.I. ; and Messrs. W. M. Haffkine, A. F. R. Hceriile, and J. Husband, that of C.I.E. Dr. J. Mackie, the President of the Egyptian Quarantine Board, and Dr. C. Gage Brown, the Medical Adviser to the Colonial Office, are promoted to K.C.M.G., and Dr. S. W. Bushell receives the C.M.G. Deputy-Inspector-General of Hospitals H. C. Woods receives the Royal Victorian Order (4th Class). So much for the strictly medical honours, but we notice among the names those of many men dis- tinguished in the scientific and philanthropic world with whose labours the medical man has necessarily much sym. pathy and sometimes a close connexion. We heartily con- gratulate, for example, Lord Rowton, who becomes a K.C.V.O. ; Sir J. Blundell Maple, who receives a baronetcy; and Mr. H. C. Burdett, now Sir Henry Burdett, K.C.B, on the recognition which their powers of practical organisa- tion have received. We are also glad to see among the new knights the names of Professor Crookes, the eminent chemist, Mr. Binnie, and Mr. Wolfe Barry, the engineers, Dr. Huggins, Mr. Christie, and Dr. Norman Lockyer, the astronomers ; and Dr. Edward Frankland, whose researches into the method of securing a pure water-supply have certainly deserved a reward from the State. MEDICAL FEES AT INQUESTS. MR. JOSEPH JOHN CLARKE, of Walthamstow, who ordered an injured woman into hospital and, when she died, gave evidence at the inquest in response to a summons, sued the coroner, Mr. Charles Eagar Lewis, at Brent- wood County-court, to obtain a guinea for his remunera- tion. The case being of some importance plaintiff was represented by a barrister, Mr. W. Ellis Hill, instructed by Messrs. Le Brasseur and Oakley, the solicitors to the London

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Page 1: THE DIAMOND JUBILEE HONOURS

1752

be elected. The eight remaining candidates are Mr. HowsE,Sir WILLIAM DALBY, Mr. CLEMEDTT LUCAS, Mr. EDMUND

OWEN, Mr. ANDREW CLARK, Mr. RICKMAN GODLBB, Mr.J. H. MORGAN, and Mr. WATSON CHEYNE. Mr. HOWSE has

served one term and has done his work so well that it would

be distinctly a loss to the College if he were not re-elected.

Mr. CLEMENT LUCAS is a colleague of Mr. Howsa at Guy’sHospital, and his election would increase to four the numberof members of the Council derived from that school. This

may not be an ideal arrangement, but it cannot be

disputed that Mr. LucAS would decidedly prove a gainto the Council. Mr. RICKMAN GODLEE is a well-known

surgeon attached to University College Hospital, and as oneof the representatives from that hospital-namely, Mr.

HEATH-is retiring from the Council, Mr. GODLEE mightvery fitly replace him. Mr. EDMUND OWEN is the senior

surgeon to St. Mary’s Hospital, which is at presentunrepresented on the Council ; we are inclined to

think that Mr. OwEN’s sympathies are rather too

conservative for him to assist adequately in the neces-

sary progress of the College; but we do not doubt

that, if elected, he would do his best to maintain the

high character of the examinations. Mr. J. H. MORGAN has

for a long time been an earnest advocate of necessary

reforms in the College. He was one of the founders of the

Association of Fellows, and was one of its honorary secre-taries in the early and more fruitful years of its exist-

ence. He is well acquainted with the problems of medicaleducation from his position at Charing-cross Hospital,and would, we feel sure, be a decided acquisition to theCouncil. Mr. WATSON CHEYNE is well known to a ’,

large section of the medical public, and at the presenttime King’s College Hospital has no representative. Mr.

ANDREW CLARK is hardly so suitable a candidate as severalof the others, though he has had much to do with medicaleducation at the Middlesex Hospital. Sir WILLIAM DALBY

has done much good work, but perhaps he is not now

quite in touch with our present day questions of education;and we may say in conclusion that in our opinion the

candidates who would most satisfactorily assist in the workof the Council-surgical, educational, and ethical-are

Mr. HowsE, Mr. LUCAS, Mr. GODLEE, Mr. BENNETT MAY,and Mr. MORGAN. I

Annotations."Ne quid nimis."

THE DIAMOND JUBILEE HONOURS.

THE medical profession has no reason to consider that ithas been left in the cold in the distribution of DiamondJubilee Honours. It is true that the greater part of thehonours bestowed upon medicine were foregone conclusions,that is, they are either promotions in the orders reserved forofficial service or recognitions of high official place, but thisis the character of the whole list, and has doubtless beendeliberately maintained as the only possible course to bepursued on an occasion where so many diverse claims might Ihave been considered from a sentimental point of view.Dr. Wilks, the President of the Royal Collage of Physiciansof London, receives the baronetcy which his eminent servicesto science and to the practical philanthropy of Guy’s

Hospital so well merit. Sir William MacCormac, thePresident of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, canalso doubly justify his baronetcy, being a sound surgeon aswell as a good organiser and a dignified official. Mr.Thomas Smith’s baronetcy will be exceedingly popular in theprofession, where his operative skill is as widely recognisedas are his amiable qualities. No harder working or more

brilliant exponent of modern medicine, of medicine as an exactscience rather than as an interesting art, could have beenselected for knighthood than Dr. W. R. Gowers. If only allthose members of the profession who have delighted in histreatises should recognise the honour given to the author,Sir William Gowers will receive as many congratulations asanyone in the list. There is a fitness about the bestowal ofa knighthood upon Dr. Felix Semon, as he is a skilful

exponent of a branch of medicine which has been born andhas reached its present sturdy size entirely during theVictorian era. We are glad to see in the lists of new

knights the names also of Dr. George F. Diffey,the President of the Royal College of Physicians of

Ireland, and Mr. William Thomson, the head of the corre-sponding surgical corporation. Among the promotions in,or selections for, the Order of the Bath, we notice ;‘severalwell-known names-notably, Dr. Richard Thorne Thorne,who becomes K.C.B. (Civil); Inspector - Generals of Hos-

pitals H. F. Norbury, J. J. L. Donnet, and H Macdonnel,and Surgeon-General C. A. Gordon: K.C.B. (Military);Dr. T. Grimshaw, Registrar - General of Ireland; Dr.David Nicolson, one of the Lord Chancellor’s Visitors

in Lunacy ; Surgeon-Major-General J. Jameson, Director-

General of the Army Medical Department, and Mr. HughAdcock, Consulting Physician to H.I.M. the Shah of

Persia: C.B. (Civil) ; and Surgeon-Major-General C. Sib-

thorpe and Brigade - Surgeon - Lieutenant - Colonel G. W.

McNalty: C,B. (Military). Surgeon-Major.GeneralsW. R.Hooper, President of the Medical Board, India Office,and J. Cleghorn, Director-General of the Indian Medical

Service, receive the honour of C.S.I. ; and Messrs. W. M.Haffkine, A. F. R. Hceriile, and J. Husband, that of C.I.E.Dr. J. Mackie, the President of the Egyptian QuarantineBoard, and Dr. C. Gage Brown, the Medical Adviser to theColonial Office, are promoted to K.C.M.G., and Dr. S. W.Bushell receives the C.M.G. Deputy-Inspector-Generalof Hospitals H. C. Woods receives the Royal VictorianOrder (4th Class). So much for the strictly medical honours,but we notice among the names those of many men dis-

tinguished in the scientific and philanthropic world withwhose labours the medical man has necessarily much sym.pathy and sometimes a close connexion. We heartily con-gratulate, for example, Lord Rowton, who becomes a

K.C.V.O. ; Sir J. Blundell Maple, who receives a baronetcy;and Mr. H. C. Burdett, now Sir Henry Burdett, K.C.B,on the recognition which their powers of practical organisa-tion have received. We are also glad to see among thenew knights the names of Professor Crookes, the eminentchemist, Mr. Binnie, and Mr. Wolfe Barry, the engineers,Dr. Huggins, Mr. Christie, and Dr. Norman Lockyer, theastronomers ; and Dr. Edward Frankland, whose researchesinto the method of securing a pure water-supply have certainlydeserved a reward from the State.

MEDICAL FEES AT INQUESTS.

MR. JOSEPH JOHN CLARKE, of Walthamstow, who orderedan injured woman into hospital and, when she died,gave evidence at the inquest in response to a summons,sued the coroner, Mr. Charles Eagar Lewis, at Brent-wood County-court, to obtain a guinea for his remunera-tion. The case being of some importance plaintiff wasrepresented by a barrister, Mr. W. Ellis Hill, instructed byMessrs. Le Brasseur and Oakley, the solicitors to the London