2
951 cough and pains in her limbs. A fortnight after the commencement of the attack she found the veins of her left leg swollen, and this in six days time increased to such a degree as to cause her great alarm, and ultimately to determine her toenterthehos- pital. The vessels at this period were very much distended,—the medical attendant remarked, to a greater extent than he had previously observed in any case in so short a period. This may be said to be in part attributable to the plethoric state of her system, the patient being a full, robnst, young woman. The usual means were employed. The leg was bandaged from the ankle to the knee, and she was ordered to re- main in bed constantly, and to take the fol- lowing expectorating mixture :—R 14’ater of Acetate of Ammonia, 3 ounces ; Cinna- mon Water, 4 ounces ; Balsamic Syrup, 1 ounce; Camphorated Tinct. of Opium, 3 , drams; Tart. Antimony, 1 grain; a table- spoonful to be taken three times a-day, with two compound colocynth pills at bed- time. To be kept on low diet, without ale or porter. , Nov. 9. The cough is better ; the bowels are free, and are not quite regular; no visible amendment in the veins; com- plains of numbness in the leg and thigh, and there is a want of sensibility at cer- tain periods. Let the medicines already prescribed be persevered in, except the pills, which for the presert are to be omitted. 16. The cough quite gone; she com- plains, however, of pain in her chest, par- ticularly under the left hreast. On re- moving the bandage from her leg, there was no visible contraction of the vessels. The only effect it had had, was that of flattening them ; but when the handage remained off for two hours, as it did on the present occasion, they dilated as much as before it was applied. It was here re- marked, that in such a plethoric sub- ject a longer period was necessary than in ordinary cases, and that the strength and fulness of the system should be re- duced before a cure could be expected. The bandage was accordingly persevered in, changing it every week until the 20th of December, when there seemed some slight indication of contraction in the ves- sels. This was evidently the result of a change in her general system. She was considerably thinner than she had been before the alteration, and to this circum- stance Sir CHARGES attributed the amend- ment which had commenced. Jan. 4, 1834. The bandage was re- moved this day, and although the im- provement was not great, yet there was some amendment. The veius were re- duced in size, and flatter, and although the bandage was kept off for two hours, the distention which constantly occurred on former occasions did not return. The sensibility of the limb was restored, and hopes were entertained, and subsequently confirmed, that a few weeks more would complete a cure, without recourse being had to more urgent measures. THE CORONER’S BILL. HAVING examined the new Bill for the regulation of the election of Coroners for Counties with every attention which it is in our power to bestow on it, we feel it an I imperative duty to state that it does not contain a single clause which is worthy of the approbation of the Legislature. Al- though in eight inquests out of ten the medical duties connected with inquests are of the utmost importance to the wel- fareof society; and although the Coro- ner’s Court is, strictly speaking, a medical institution; and although the treatment which medical practitioners have expe- rienced throughout England has given rise to loud, bitter, and general com- plaint on the subject; yet, not a single provision exists in the Bill to prevent a repetition of such grievances,-to obviate so many sources of dissatisfaction. As the Bill is now constructed, it cannot be passed into a law without reflecting disgrace on the discernment and wisdom of the Legis- lature. We must again urge, as a matter of propriety, the postponement of the measure until the House is put in posses- sion of the Report of the Medical Com- mittee. Mr. CRIPPS himself cannot rea- sonably object to such a proposal, and we, entreat that Hon. Gentleman to examine with that degree of care which the im- portance of the proposed measure de- mands, a Bill which has been put into his’ hands by some individual whose intentions. may be meritorious, but whose capacity is, not equal to the task which he undertook- to discharge, when he patched up the do- cument in question.

THE CORONER'S BILL

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951

cough and pains in her limbs. A fortnightafter the commencement of the attack shefound the veins of her left leg swollen, andthis in six days time increased to such adegree as to cause her great alarm, andultimately to determine her toenterthehos-pital. The vessels at this period were verymuch distended,—the medical attendantremarked, to a greater extent than he hadpreviously observed in any case in so shorta period. This may be said to be in partattributable to the plethoric state of hersystem, the patient being a full, robnst,young woman. The usual means were

employed. The leg was bandaged from theankle to the knee, and she was ordered to re-main in bed constantly, and to take the fol-lowing expectorating mixture :—R 14’ater

of Acetate of Ammonia, 3 ounces ; Cinna-mon Water, 4 ounces ; Balsamic Syrup, 1ounce; Camphorated Tinct. of Opium, 3 ,

drams; Tart. Antimony, 1 grain; a table-spoonful to be taken three times a-day,with two compound colocynth pills at bed-time. To be kept on low diet, withoutale or porter.

,

Nov. 9. The cough is better ; the bowelsare free, and are not quite regular; novisible amendment in the veins; com-

plains of numbness in the leg and thigh,and there is a want of sensibility at cer-tain periods. Let the medicines alreadyprescribed be persevered in, except thepills, which for the presert are to beomitted.

16. The cough quite gone; she com-plains, however, of pain in her chest, par-ticularly under the left hreast. On re-

moving the bandage from her leg, therewas no visible contraction of the vessels.The only effect it had had, was that offlattening them ; but when the handageremained off for two hours, as it did onthe present occasion, they dilated as muchas before it was applied. It was here re-

marked, that in such a plethoric sub-ject a longer period was necessary thanin ordinary cases, and that the strengthand fulness of the system should be re-duced before a cure could be expected.The bandage was accordingly perseveredin, changing it every week until the 20thof December, when there seemed someslight indication of contraction in the ves-sels. This was evidently the result of a

change in her general system. She was

considerably thinner than she had beenbefore the alteration, and to this circum-stance Sir CHARGES attributed the amend-ment which had commenced.

Jan. 4, 1834. The bandage was re-

moved this day, and although the im-provement was not great, yet there wassome amendment. The veius were re-

duced in size, and flatter, and althoughthe bandage was kept off for two hours,the distention which constantly occurredon former occasions did not return. The

sensibility of the limb was restored, andhopes were entertained, and subsequentlyconfirmed, that a few weeks more wouldcomplete a cure, without recourse beinghad to more urgent measures.

THE CORONER’S BILL.

HAVING examined the new Bill for the

regulation of the election of Coroners forCounties with every attention which it is

in our power to bestow on it, we feel it an

I imperative duty to state that it does not

contain a single clause which is worthyof the approbation of the Legislature. Al-

though in eight inquests out of ten the

medical duties connected with inquestsare of the utmost importance to the wel-fareof society; and although the Coro-ner’s Court is, strictly speaking, a medicalinstitution; and although the treatmentwhich medical practitioners have expe-rienced throughout England has givenrise to loud, bitter, and general com-

plaint on the subject; yet, not a singleprovision exists in the Bill to prevent a

repetition of such grievances,-to obviateso many sources of dissatisfaction. As the

Bill is now constructed, it cannot be passedinto a law without reflecting disgrace onthe discernment and wisdom of the Legis-lature. We must again urge, as a matterof propriety, the postponement of the

measure until the House is put in posses-sion of the Report of the Medical Com-mittee. Mr. CRIPPS himself cannot rea-

sonably object to such a proposal, and we,entreat that Hon. Gentleman to examine

with that degree of care which the im-

portance of the proposed measure de-

mands, a Bill which has been put into his’hands by some individual whose intentions.may be meritorious, but whose capacity is,not equal to the task which he undertook-to discharge, when he patched up the do-

cument in question.

952

PARLIAMENTARY MEDICAL COMMITTEE.

THE sittings of the Committee for thereception of viva-voce evidence were com-menced- contrary to an announcement

previously made-on Thursday last, at

one o’clock. The members of the Com-

mittee established their character for gal-lantry on the occasion, by commencing ’’

with one of the weird sisters-the agedlady in Pall Mall East. When called for

she was introduced, with becoming diffi-dence and modesty, by Miss F. HAWKINS,who, for some time past, has presided as

maid of honour at the old lady’s toilet.

We must not disclose the secrets of the

Parliament House, and consequently re-frain from describing the peculiaritieswhich were exposed to view during thisfirst examination of an antiquated dame;whose tricks connected with medical

practice and science have long renderedher more notorious than respected. The

old lady, from present indications, wouldseem to protest that this inquiry is a

attack on her virtue. Hence, blushing and

trembling at every question of the Chair-man, she has summoned to her aid the

renowned President—the doughty Sir

HENRY HALFORD; and the valiant baro-

net, excited by a noble and chivalrous

spirit, will enter the field of scrutiny atone o’clock on Monday next, when the

sittings of the Committee are to be re-

sumed.

We may take this opportunity of stat-ing, for the information of metropolitanpractitioners, that the sittings are held incommittee-room No. 13, and that gentle-men of the medical profession, on sendingtheir cards to the chairman, by the door-

keeper, are favoured with an order for

admission. This was the system pursuedon Thursday last, and we have not heardthat it is to be departed from on Monday.

CORRESPONDENTS.

I The publication. of the report of thetrial "Baker v.Parrott" would not, in thepresent state of the proceedings, he pro-ductive of the least benefit to the plaintiff.An indictment against the jury could nothe sustained. It appears to us that a ver-dict would have been returned for the

plaintiff, had not the jury taken into con-sideration the question of costs, and thatconsideration seems to have produced anerroneous impression on their minds.

Surely, if the claims of the plaintiff werefounded on justice, he ought not to he de-prived of his right merely on the pleathat a verdict in his favour would be at.tended with additional expense to the de-fendant. The loss attendant on the re-

fusal to pay under such circumstances, isa public benefit, as it often proves an effi-cient punishment to unjust debtors. Thata plaintiff should be deprived of his justright on the pretext that this punishmentmay not he inflicted on the defendant, is aperversion of every sound principle of lawand equity. Thus much the secondaryshould have explained to the jury.The publication of the substance of the

letter signed " A Pupil of —," would prove theruin of the lecturer, as even a satisfactory reintationof such statements could not remove the suspicionswhich announcements of that description are always- II, c to exite. If our correspondent will call at theoffice, and confidentially substantiate his allegations,we shall know how to discharge our duty. Thestudents must and shall be protectedA Constant Reader and Admirer—Not

in the present session of Parliament, but m the nextunThe publication of the letters of Dr.

Weatherill, Dr. M’Carthy artcl some others, is uu-avoidably postponed for a veek.

, A correspondent at Birmingham wishesto know "the probable time when the Essays onMedical Reform, (!) advertised by Dr. Epps, will beopened, and the decision made." (We could not in-set t liat our correspondent wishes us to makes public.)

A Sul scriber—Yes

The report from Worcester, and theletter of a Ten-Years’ Subscriber, have been re-ceived.

NOTICE.—It is particularly requestedthat ALL letter of basiness forwarded to the Officeof THE LANCET—whether the) mlate to the con-tents of the jonrnai, or refer to transactions con-

nected with the Commission Department—be IN-

VARIABLY addressed to THE EDITOR—Mr.WAKLEY.If this rule be not observed, it is impossible to guardagainst the impositions of scribblers whoappear to have no other employment or pleasurethan that of subjecting the conductors of journals to.( heavy extortion ill the shape of post-tax. If a!)letters of business traumitted to the office bh ad-dressed 10 the Editor, and NO letters, unless so ad-dressed, be received except the port,t;;e be paid, im-positiohs will be effectually prevented.

ERRATUM.—In last week’s leaclea, page 890, line19, for lenve the inquiry, read lead the inquiry.