The Context and Content of Community Integrated Teaching and Learning

  • Published on
    30-Mar-2016

  • View
    214

  • Download
    0

DESCRIPTION

This is the presentation which accompanied Ms. Ma. Lourdes Melegrito's session at the Community Integrated Teaching and Learning Workshop organised by AUN USR&S@AsiaEngage.

Transcript

  • Please note that this publication is only meant to be a reference. The author should be

    cited if this publication is used as a source. Reproductions, alterations or

    transformations are not allowed without the express permission of the author.

  • The Context and Content of

    Community Integrated Teaching

    and Learning

    Community Integrated Teaching and Learning

  • CONTEXTUALIZING CITL

  • HISTORICAL CONTEXT

    Classical theories of education by Plato and Aristotle as intended to produce good persons; to act on knowledge in the pursuit of good ends

    Classical liberal thinkers like Locke and Kant argued for character education, Mill for capable and sensible civic participation, and Rosseaus sympathetic and civil interaction with other members of the society

    These philosophers have envisioned university graduates prepared to contribute to alleviation of human suffering, insurance of human rights and development of a productive society

    (Speck and Hoppe, 2004)

  • YET

    Academy implicated in the fracturing of the

    community

    during the past fifty years, American Universities have come

    to be dominated by powerful interrelated values: materialism,

    individualism and competitiveness(Astin, 1993)

  • A GLIMPSE OF THE

    COMMUNITY FRACTURING

    Chinua Achebe: Things Fall Apart

    American culture has lost a sense of community; socially relevant virtues have fallen apart Robert

    Putnam: Bowling Alone

    Evidence of the loss of social capital; there is alienation

    Speck and Hoppe, 2004

  • IMAGE OF HIGHER

    EDUCATION

    Educational institutions are expected to play a

    significant role in social development and nation

    building BUTesoteric research, failure to

    promote moral character, and civic consciousness,

    etc

  • HIGHER EDUCATION: SEEN AS

    AN IVORY TOWER

    For producing abstract research unconnected to real

    life problems; for being indifferent to societal and

    community problems and for producing poorly

    educated students who are not only unprepared for

    work life but who also have no souls. (Thomas,2000)

  • REMEDY FOR A

    FRACTURED COMMUNITY

    HEIs are challenged to respond beyond its traditional

    function of providing knowledge through teaching and

    research.

    The emerging role is to contribute to public service

    with the community through collaborative discovery,

    learning, engagement and application.

    Create a classroom that would rebuild the fracture: link

    theory in classroom with student participation in community

    affairs (Speck and Hoppe, 2004)

  • HENCE,

    THE FOUNDATIONS OF HEIS CE

    SUCH AS CITL ARE:

    HEIs commitment HEIs fundamental goal:

    To nation building: Student learning and

    Social Responsibility development

    CITL

  • TWO MAJOR STRATEGIES OF

    REBUILDING

    Renew historic commitment of HEIs to nation building

    and in addressing societys problems : Scholarship of

    Engagement (Boyer 1990, 1993)

    Effectiveness in achieving its most fundamental goal which is

    student learning and development: Following Dewey

    (Pedagocic Creed), Freire(Critical Pedagogy), Kolb

    (Jacoby and Associates)

  • PURSUE

    SCHOLARSHIP OF

    ENGAGEMENT

    The triumvirate of teaching , research and service has ruled

    yet service remains to be less rewarded and respected (Jay, 2012)

    The challenge is to broaden the scope of scholarship and pursue

    scholarship of engagement (Boyer, 1990).

    SE: bridging the gap between community/societal needs and

    academic resources (Boyer, 1996)

  • THEORETICAL UNDERPINNINGS

    OF CITL Dewey (1859-1952)- to prepare him for the future life means to

    give him command of himself; it means to train him that he will have the full and ready use of all this capacities.

    making sense of knowledge or what has been learned through (community) experience

    meaning making facilitated by reflective problem solving

    Deweys Progressive education involves CE that grapples with

    real social problems, requiring students to come up with

    solutions and applying ideas studied in the classroom

  • THEORETICAL UNDERPINNINGS OF

    CITL

    Freire:

    Balance between theory and practice=praxis (informed action)

    Conscientization (using education as a means of consciously shaping the person and the society

    Action-reflection (interconnected when one is sacrificed the other suffers) ; -clear course of future action is possible when there is

    authentic reflection renewed reflection

  • KOLBS INFLUENCE TO CITL

    Experiential Learning Model (ELM) 4 stage cyclical process

  • AND THE P R A C T I C A L M O D E E N R I C H I N G H E S C I V I C R E S P O N S I B I L I T Y A N D S T U D E N T D E V E L O P M E N T

    Connect learning and community via academic

    curriculum

    Align the perspectives of the academe to the nature of

    community work and students learning methodology as

    they realize schools mission to contribute to social

    transformation.

    Deprogram instructors and students away (partly) from

    traditional classroom roles, relationships, and norms

  • HOW DO WE OPERATIONALIZE THE

    COMMITMENT?

  • PERSPECTIVE-SETTING

    Curriculum Integration

    1. Community based sources of knowledge

    included in the curricular content

    2. Learning thru community interactive and experiential

    process

    3. Student learning outcomes that reflect the

    impact integrated and experiential learning process

    CITL

    Conceptualizing CITL

  • Student development

    2.Community integration, identification of relevant issue, reflection on the

    issue

    1. Expose students to fundamental knowledge,

    skills and values relevant to the discipline

    3. Application and action in partnership with the

    community

    CITL

    Conceptualizing CITL

  • Community Impact 2.Community needs

    matched with scholarly resources

    1. Community Profiling

    3. Contributed in promoting poverty

    alleviation, democratization process, etc

    CITL

    Conceptualizing CITL

  • PRINCIPLES

    Appropriateness of the pedagogy to the desired learning outcomes; student enhancement

    Meaningfulness of the student activity to the community; community is involved

    Evidence of link of the partnership and scholarship

  • PRINCIPLES

    That the community are also sources and "creators of knowledge"

    Learning also happens in the actual interaction, exposure and exchange with the community

    Individual and collective reflection and action

  • C O M M U N I T Y I N T E G R A T E D T E A C H I N G A N D L E A R N I N G

    Community

    Students Faculty

    Context & Concepts

    Types &

    Models

    Reflection & Way

    Forward

    Implementing Mechanism

  • END

    A growing number of educators are recognizing the

    power of the community for civic learning, drawing upon

    the educational philosophies like Dewey. These

    educators have found that thinking more broadly about

    where and how learning takes place is equally as

    important as what is learned. It also unleashes a vast set

    of resources for learning and allows education to be more

    connected to democratic revitalization.

Recommended

View more >