1
872 .upon any increase that may be made in the assessment of property in the country. This resolution will commend itself to London ratepayers. The system of charging .upon the rateable value of a house is not equitable, seeing that rateable value and the amount of water consumed often bear no relation to each other, and already through the exist- ing arrangements many London householders are paying largely in excess of that which would be a proper amount for the water used, The Vestry of St. James, Westminster, has determined to memorialise Parliament in support of the Council’s views, and it may be expected that other local authorities will adopt the same course. The action of the Council makes more necessary than before the acquirement by London of its water-supplies, but the basis of compensa- tion is one which is not now easier of settlement than when the subject was under consideration some years ago. THE CASE OF JOSEPH MERRICK AT THE LONDON HOSPITAL. JOSEPH MERRICK, the so-called "Elephant man," died on Friday, the llth inst. He had been exhibited about the country for some time till the case attracted the attention of the authorities of the London Hospital, who offered him a shelter within their walls. It seems that on Thursday last the man was cut in the garden apparently quite well. On Friday, at 1.30 P.M., he was seen for the last time in his room alive, and at 3 P.M. he was discovered dead. Death was probably due to the falling back of the head, which was of - enormous weight. Merrick has been the subject of many accounts, especially in American papers, and has been visited by half the celebrities in London. In 1886, as he was being exhibited in the East-end of London, he was seen by Mr. Treves, who henceforward kept him under observa- tion, and who has done much to contribute to the comfort of the unfortunate man. One of the greatest undertakings ,connected with the " Elephant man " was getting him into .a theatre without his being discovered. MEMORIAL OF PROFESSOR VON VOLKMANN. STEPS are being taken to erect a permanent memorial of ,the late Professor von Volkmann in the form of a statue or bust, to be placed in the Halle Surgical Clinic. A com- mittee has been formed to further the project, Dr. Acker- mann, Professor von Bergmann, Dr. Hiller, Professor F. Krause, and Dr. Schrader being the medical members on the acting committee. Sir James Paget, Sir Joseph Lister, :Sir W. MacCormac, and Sir Spencer Wells have joined the movement, and will be happy to forward contributions from this country. - CASE OF MARTIN v. STUBBS. WE direct the attention of our readers to the report of _Martin v. Stubbs, an important medical trial (page 875). We cannot say that the case is in any sense satisfactory. First, it is incomplete. A certificate of death by a medical ,man called in at the end of the case reflected seriously on the treatment of the medical man called in first. Unfor- tunately, there was no post-mortem examination, aad the coroner, in the exercise of his discretion, refused the request of the practitioner first in attendance to hold an inquest, though Mr. Stubbs, who signed the certificate, attributed .death primarily to " an overdose (two teaspoonfuls) given by another doctor," the secondary cause being peritonitis. We have only to refer our readers to the medical evidence to show how weak the case of the defend- ant was in attributing death in such a case primarily to two drachms of turpentine, qualified as it was by - a. grain of opium beforehand, and subsequent doses of laudanum. Dr. Stevenson well said that anyone who attri- buted peritonitis to the administration of turpentine would be going a long way without the evidence afforded by a necropsy. Dr. Christison, in his Dispensatory, says turpentine " is very serviceable for removing tympanitic distension in typhoid fever, peritonitis, and other febrile and abdominal diseases." No doubt it might in such a dose cause strangury. As Dr. Brunton said, a larger or a smaller dose might be safer. Probably, too, the good effect without the risk of strangury might have been obtained by administering the medicine as an enema. But these are details which do not affect the conduct of the practitioner in an uagent case, or justify a brother prac- titioner in adverse criticism. Even Dr. Brunton, a witness for the defence, could not support the defendant in attri- buting peritonitis to the turpentine. The jury found for the plaintiff, and awarded damages to the amount of jE200, for which judgment was given with costs. DEATH OF GEORGE CORNELIUS JONSON, L.R.C.P. EDIN., L.S.A. LOND. WE regret to announce the death of Mr. George Cornelius Jonson, President of the Council of the Royal Medical Benevolent College, Epsom, and chairman of the Medical Benevolent Fund Committee. On Sunday last he suc- cumbed, in his 82nd year, to an attack of apoplexy. The deceased gentleman had been connected with these charities from their foundation, and was distinguished for the care with which he investigated cases of distress, and his wisdom in the admiuistration of aid was well worthy of imitation. He has been described as a perfect chairman- firm, decided, genial, courteous, and a man who never seemed so happy as when doing good. FOREIGN UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENCE. Berne.-Dr. Dumont has been appointed privat-docent in Surgery. Bologna.-Dr. Babacci has been recognised as pr-ivat. docent in Operative Medicine. Modencc.-Dr. Vanni of Florence has been appointed Extraordinary Professor of Pathology. Munich.—A new Professorship of Clinical Medicine is to be established which will probably be given to Dr. Schech. Naples.—Dr. Colpi has been recognised as privat-docent in Dermatology and Syphilis. Dr. Lussana, Professor of Physiology, has been granted the title of Emeritus Pro- fessor. Pisa.-Professor Rammo of Siena has been appointed Professor of Medical Pathology. Salamanca.—Don Indalacio Cuesta has been appointed to the Chair of Forensic Medicine. DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN. THE deaths of the following distinguished members of the medical profession abroad have been announced :- Dr. Michaux, Clinical Professor in the University of Louvain.-Dr. Champenois, formerly Inspecting Surgeon in the French army. - Dr. J. Verevkin, privat-docent in Medical Jurisprudence in the Medico-Chirurgical Academy, St. Petersburg.—Señor Don Nicolas Iglesias Crego, Professor of Hygiene in the Medical School of Salamanca. NUREMBERG, after a respite of several weeks from the influenza, which during its prevalence attacked more than two-thirds of the population, is now suffering from a return of the unwelcome visitant. Last week’s official report announces five cases of a very pronounced character.

THE CASE OF JOSEPH MERRICK AT THE LONDON HOSPITAL

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Page 1: THE CASE OF JOSEPH MERRICK AT THE LONDON HOSPITAL

872

.upon any increase that may be made in the assessment of

property in the country. This resolution will commenditself to London ratepayers. The system of charging.upon the rateable value of a house is not equitable, seeingthat rateable value and the amount of water consumed oftenbear no relation to each other, and already through the exist-ing arrangements many London householders are payinglargely in excess of that which would be a proper amount forthe water used, The Vestry of St. James, Westminster, hasdetermined to memorialise Parliament in support of theCouncil’s views, and it may be expected that other localauthorities will adopt the same course. The action of theCouncil makes more necessary than before the acquirementby London of its water-supplies, but the basis of compensa-tion is one which is not now easier of settlement than whenthe subject was under consideration some years ago.

THE CASE OF JOSEPH MERRICK AT THELONDON HOSPITAL.

JOSEPH MERRICK, the so-called "Elephant man," died onFriday, the llth inst. He had been exhibited about the

country for some time till the case attracted the attentionof the authorities of the London Hospital, who offered him ashelter within their walls. It seems that on Thursday lastthe man was cut in the garden apparently quite well. On

Friday, at 1.30 P.M., he was seen for the last time in his roomalive, and at 3 P.M. he was discovered dead. Death was

probably due to the falling back of the head, which was of- enormous weight. Merrick has been the subject of manyaccounts, especially in American papers, and has beenvisited by half the celebrities in London. In 1886, as hewas being exhibited in the East-end of London, he was seenby Mr. Treves, who henceforward kept him under observa-tion, and who has done much to contribute to the comfortof the unfortunate man. One of the greatest undertakings,connected with the " Elephant man " was getting him into.a theatre without his being discovered.

MEMORIAL OF PROFESSOR VON VOLKMANN.

STEPS are being taken to erect a permanent memorial of,the late Professor von Volkmann in the form of a statue or

bust, to be placed in the Halle Surgical Clinic. A com-mittee has been formed to further the project, Dr. Acker-mann, Professor von Bergmann, Dr. Hiller, Professor F.Krause, and Dr. Schrader being the medical members on theacting committee. Sir James Paget, Sir Joseph Lister,:Sir W. MacCormac, and Sir Spencer Wells have joined themovement, and will be happy to forward contributions fromthis country. -

CASE OF MARTIN v. STUBBS.

WE direct the attention of our readers to the report of_Martin v. Stubbs, an important medical trial (page 875).We cannot say that the case is in any sense satisfactory.First, it is incomplete. A certificate of death by a medical,man called in at the end of the case reflected seriously onthe treatment of the medical man called in first. Unfor-

tunately, there was no post-mortem examination, aad thecoroner, in the exercise of his discretion, refused the requestof the practitioner first in attendance to hold an inquest,though Mr. Stubbs, who signed the certificate, attributed.death primarily to " an overdose (two teaspoonfuls) givenby another doctor," the secondary cause being peritonitis.We have only to refer our readers to the medicalevidence to show how weak the case of the defend-ant was in attributing death in such a case primarilyto two drachms of turpentine, qualified as it was by- a. grain of opium beforehand, and subsequent doses of

laudanum. Dr. Stevenson well said that anyone who attri-buted peritonitis to the administration of turpentine wouldbe going a long way without the evidence afforded bya necropsy. Dr. Christison, in his Dispensatory, saysturpentine " is very serviceable for removing tympaniticdistension in typhoid fever, peritonitis, and other febrileand abdominal diseases." No doubt it might in such adose cause strangury. As Dr. Brunton said, a larger ora smaller dose might be safer. Probably, too, the goodeffect without the risk of strangury might have beenobtained by administering the medicine as an enema. Butthese are details which do not affect the conduct of the

practitioner in an uagent case, or justify a brother prac-titioner in adverse criticism. Even Dr. Brunton, a witnessfor the defence, could not support the defendant in attri-buting peritonitis to the turpentine. The jury found forthe plaintiff, and awarded damages to the amount of jE200,for which judgment was given with costs.

DEATH OF GEORGE CORNELIUS JONSON,L.R.C.P. EDIN., L.S.A. LOND.

WE regret to announce the death of Mr. George CorneliusJonson, President of the Council of the Royal MedicalBenevolent College, Epsom, and chairman of the MedicalBenevolent Fund Committee. On Sunday last he suc-cumbed, in his 82nd year, to an attack of apoplexy. Thedeceased gentleman had been connected with these charitiesfrom their foundation, and was distinguished for thecare with which he investigated cases of distress, and hiswisdom in the admiuistration of aid was well worthy ofimitation. He has been described as a perfect chairman-firm, decided, genial, courteous, and a man who neverseemed so happy as when doing good.

FOREIGN UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENCE.

Berne.-Dr. Dumont has been appointed privat-docentin Surgery.Bologna.-Dr. Babacci has been recognised as pr-ivat.

docent in Operative Medicine.Modencc.-Dr. Vanni of Florence has been appointed

Extraordinary Professor of Pathology.Munich.—A new Professorship of Clinical Medicine is to

be established which will probably be given to Dr. Schech.Naples.—Dr. Colpi has been recognised as privat-docent

in Dermatology and Syphilis. Dr. Lussana, Professor ofPhysiology, has been granted the title of Emeritus Pro-fessor.

Pisa.-Professor Rammo of Siena has been appointedProfessor of Medical Pathology.

Salamanca.—Don Indalacio Cuesta has been appointedto the Chair of Forensic Medicine.

DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN.THE deaths of the following distinguished members of the

medical profession abroad have been announced :-Dr. Michaux, Clinical Professor in the University of

Louvain.-Dr. Champenois, formerly Inspecting Surgeon inthe French army. - Dr. J. Verevkin, privat-docent inMedical Jurisprudence in the Medico-Chirurgical Academy,St. Petersburg.—Señor Don Nicolas Iglesias Crego, Professorof Hygiene in the Medical School of Salamanca.

NUREMBERG, after a respite of several weeks from theinfluenza, which during its prevalence attacked more thantwo-thirds of the population, is now suffering from a returnof the unwelcome visitant. Last week’s official reportannounces five cases of a very pronounced character.