1
1055 DISPENSARIES AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS.-TYPHUS IN FLINT. by more than one example. We have heard of a case of such downright dishonesty as the production by an albu- minuric eubject of a fluid other than his own for examina- tion. There is’therefore need both for the stringency of .companies and for shrewdness on the part of their medical representatives in dealing with the question of life in- atlranee among a certain class of applicants. DISPENSARIES AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS. . A GRIFATLY lauded panacea for the evils of gratuitous medical advice, we all know, is the establishment of provident dispensaries. At this very moment an influential committee, appointed by a public meeting, is considering the best - means by which they can be established and encouraged in London; and we ourselves have always been anxious to see such institutions supported by the working classes. But great care is necessary to prevent their being worked in unprofessional ways. And we are constantly receiving circulars, handbills, &c., announcing these institutions and their arrangements and charges. The names of the members of the staff are often included. The general effect of the whole is not to convey a high idea of the value of medical services, or of the methods of competition in the medical profession. We invite expressions of opinion as to the best way of avoiding these evils. We all want to promote thrift and diminish the amount of gratuitous medical relief. The problem is to do so without degrading the medical pro- fession and the popular estimate of medical services. TYPHUS IN FLINT. WE regret to learn that the outbreak of typhus fever in Flint still continues, and that it has been found necessary, -owing to a sudden increase in the number attacked, to con- vert the assembly room at Flint Castle into a hospital. The circumstances attaching to this outbreak are very unfortu- nate. Typhus is so rare that it was hardly recognised as such in the first instance, and hence the disease tended to spread. Dr. Tegid Evans, the medical officer of health, we greatly regret to say, in the performance of his duties, contracted the disease and died. Since then Mr. Spear, -of the medical department of the Local Government Board, has visited the town, and has advised the mayor and the corporation as to the action which should be taken to stay the spread of the infection. Fourteen fresh cases are reported to have recently occurred. DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC MEN. THE deaths of the following foreign medical and scientific men are announced :-Dr. Bernhard Studer, formerly Pro- fessor of Physics and Geology in Berne, at the age of ninety-three.-Dr. Ludwig Rohden, director of the recently established Sea-bathing Infirmary at Norderney, at the early age of forty-eight, suddenly, at Gardone, Riviera, from the bursting of an aneurysm into the bronchus. Dr. Hohl, Extraordinary Professor in the Science Faculty of Tubingen, at the age of eighty-one. - THE BOWER AND KEATES CASE. THE profession will learn with satisfaction that there is some hope of its soon hearing the end of this case, which well illustrates the delay and the costliness of law. The committee charged with the duty of administering the funds raised to pay the legal expenses of Messrs. Bower and Keates met at Sir William Jenner’s on Tuesday night, and reported the termination of litigation. A full statement of the principal facts will shortly be laid before the subscribers, who will be asked to empower the committee to distribute, the balance which remains after paying expenses by con- tributing to the expenses of similar cases or to charitable purposes within the profession. Roughly it may be said that over £ l’700 were raised in little more than a week, and that a balance of about X500 is left after the payment of expenses. - SPECIALISM IN EXCELSIS! ’, WE have received a programme of the first annual meet- ing of the "Association of Genito-urinary Surgeons," which is being held this week at the Laurel House, Lakewood, N.J. The establishment of this Association has been attended with so much success, and commends itself so thoroughly to the more enlightened members of the profession, that many similar ones are shortly to be inaugurated! Among those more immediately to be promoted are associations of "Umbilicologists," of "Rhinologists," of "Tenotomists," of "Depilatory Surgeons," and of "Skin-grafters:’ The only reason we can perceive why this list should not be in- definitely extended is that surgery as an art would, by such differentiation, speedily be resolved into its constituent elements, and its professors broken up into repellent groups of solemn deliberators on the utility and beauty of the segregation of parts. - VICTORIA UNIVERSITY AND THE YORKSHIRE COLLEGE. ON the 12th inst. the Yorkshire College made a formal application to the Court of Governors of the Victoria University to be admitted as a College of the University, and the application was referred to the Council for report in accordance with the provisions of the Charter. A further step has therefore been taken towards the fusion of the three colleges of Manchester, Liverpool, and Leeds into one great university, and we hope that no time will be lost by the Council in taking action towards the furtherance of the desired union. ___ THE BRUSSELS SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS. THE Surgical Section of the International Congress of Science and Industry, which is to be held in Brussels next year, has given notice that instruments and apparatus of the following descriptions will be specially acceptable :- (1) Apparatus for the treatment of spinal curvature; (2) materials for dressings; (3) gynaecological instru- ments ; (4) instruments for diseases of the urinary tract; (5) instruments for the treatment of glandular enlargements in the pharynx; (6) laryngological apparatus; (7) apparatus and dressings for antiseptic operations on the eye ; (8) appa- ratus for the measurement of the acuteness of hearing. THE PENJEH SORE. AT the instance of the inspector of the military medical district of the Caucasus, a special commission has been appointed to proceed to the neighbourhood of Penjeh for the purpose of studying the etiology and characters of the so-called Penjeh sore. Dr. Rapchevski of St. Petersburg has been selected as director of the expedition. Some ob- servations on this affection made by Dr. Suski, and com- municated by him to the Vrach, were mentioned in THE LANCET of April 10th, 1886. This paper was subsequently (June 12th) referred to by Surgeon Pierson, who pointed out the identity of the Penjeh affection with the well-known Delhi boil, &c.; and, again, by Dr. J. Hickman (THE LANCET, Aug. 14th), who mentioned that he had also pointed out this identity in an Indian journal, and referred to a full geographical account to be found in Hirsch’s Geographical Pathology, and also to an article by himself in the Practitioner of Jan. 1886.

THE BOWER AND KEATES CASE

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1055DISPENSARIES AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS.-TYPHUS IN FLINT.

by more than one example. We have heard of a case ofsuch downright dishonesty as the production by an albu-minuric eubject of a fluid other than his own for examina-tion. There is’therefore need both for the stringency of.companies and for shrewdness on the part of their medicalrepresentatives in dealing with the question of life in-

atlranee among a certain class of applicants.

DISPENSARIES AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS.

. A GRIFATLY lauded panacea for the evils of gratuitousmedical advice, we all know, is the establishment of providentdispensaries. At this very moment an influential committee,appointed by a public meeting, is considering the best- means by which they can be established and encouraged inLondon; and we ourselves have always been anxious tosee such institutions supported by the working classes. Butgreat care is necessary to prevent their being worked inunprofessional ways. And we are constantly receivingcirculars, handbills, &c., announcing these institutions andtheir arrangements and charges. The names of the membersof the staff are often included. The general effect of thewhole is not to convey a high idea of the value of medicalservices, or of the methods of competition in the medicalprofession. We invite expressions of opinion as to thebest way of avoiding these evils. We all want to promotethrift and diminish the amount of gratuitous medical relief.The problem is to do so without degrading the medical pro-fession and the popular estimate of medical services.

TYPHUS IN FLINT.

WE regret to learn that the outbreak of typhus fever inFlint still continues, and that it has been found necessary,-owing to a sudden increase in the number attacked, to con-vert the assembly room at Flint Castle into a hospital. Thecircumstances attaching to this outbreak are very unfortu-nate. Typhus is so rare that it was hardly recognised assuch in the first instance, and hence the disease tended tospread. Dr. Tegid Evans, the medical officer of health, wegreatly regret to say, in the performance of his duties,contracted the disease and died. Since then Mr. Spear,-of the medical department of the Local Government Board,has visited the town, and has advised the mayor and thecorporation as to the action which should be taken to

stay the spread of the infection. Fourteen fresh cases are

reported to have recently occurred.

DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL ANDSCIENTIFIC MEN.

THE deaths of the following foreign medical and scientificmen are announced :-Dr. Bernhard Studer, formerly Pro-fessor of Physics and Geology in Berne, at the age of

ninety-three.-Dr. Ludwig Rohden, director of the recentlyestablished Sea-bathing Infirmary at Norderney, at the earlyage of forty-eight, suddenly, at Gardone, Riviera, from thebursting of an aneurysm into the bronchus. - Dr. Hohl,Extraordinary Professor in the Science Faculty of Tubingen,at the age of eighty-one. -

THE BOWER AND KEATES CASE.

THE profession will learn with satisfaction that there issome hope of its soon hearing the end of this case, whichwell illustrates the delay and the costliness of law. Thecommittee charged with the duty of administering the fundsraised to pay the legal expenses of Messrs. Bower and Keatesmet at Sir William Jenner’s on Tuesday night, and reportedthe termination of litigation. A full statement of theprincipal facts will shortly be laid before the subscribers,who will be asked to empower the committee to distribute,

the balance which remains after paying expenses by con-tributing to the expenses of similar cases or to charitablepurposes within the profession. Roughly it may be saidthat over £ l’700 were raised in little more than a week, andthat a balance of about X500 is left after the payment ofexpenses. -

SPECIALISM IN EXCELSIS!

’, WE have received a programme of the first annual meet-

ing of the "Association of Genito-urinary Surgeons," whichis being held this week at the Laurel House, Lakewood, N.J.The establishment of this Association has been attendedwith so much success, and commends itself so thoroughly tothe more enlightened members of the profession, that manysimilar ones are shortly to be inaugurated! Among thosemore immediately to be promoted are associations of

"Umbilicologists," of "Rhinologists," of "Tenotomists," of"Depilatory Surgeons," and of "Skin-grafters:’ The onlyreason we can perceive why this list should not be in-definitely extended is that surgery as an art would, by suchdifferentiation, speedily be resolved into its constituent

elements, and its professors broken up into repellent groupsof solemn deliberators on the utility and beauty of thesegregation of parts. -

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY AND THE YORKSHIRE

COLLEGE.

ON the 12th inst. the Yorkshire College made a formalapplication to the Court of Governors of the Victoria

University to be admitted as a College of the University,and the application was referred to the Council for reportin accordance with the provisions of the Charter. A furtherstep has therefore been taken towards the fusion of thethree colleges of Manchester, Liverpool, and Leeds into onegreat university, and we hope that no time will be lost bythe Council in taking action towards the furtherance of thedesired union.

___

THE BRUSSELS SCIENTIFIC CONGRESS.

THE Surgical Section of the International Congress ofScience and Industry, which is to be held in Brussels nextyear, has given notice that instruments and apparatus ofthe following descriptions will be specially acceptable :-(1) Apparatus for the treatment of spinal curvature;(2) materials for dressings; (3) gynaecological instru-

ments ; (4) instruments for diseases of the urinary tract;(5) instruments for the treatment of glandular enlargementsin the pharynx; (6) laryngological apparatus; (7) apparatusand dressings for antiseptic operations on the eye ; (8) appa-ratus for the measurement of the acuteness of hearing.

THE PENJEH SORE.

AT the instance of the inspector of the military medicaldistrict of the Caucasus, a special commission has been

appointed to proceed to the neighbourhood of Penjeh for thepurpose of studying the etiology and characters of theso-called Penjeh sore. Dr. Rapchevski of St. Petersburghas been selected as director of the expedition. Some ob-servations on this affection made by Dr. Suski, and com-municated by him to the Vrach, were mentioned in THELANCET of April 10th, 1886. This paper was subsequently(June 12th) referred to by Surgeon Pierson, who pointedout the identity of the Penjeh affection with the well-knownDelhi boil, &c.; and, again, by Dr. J. Hickman (THE LANCET,Aug. 14th), who mentioned that he had also pointed outthis identity in an Indian journal, and referred to a fullgeographical account to be found in Hirsch’s GeographicalPathology, and also to an article by himself in thePractitioner of Jan. 1886.