The Aims and Methods of Scouting. Learning Objectives Understand the underlying principles of Scouting Realize how the Aims of Scouting apply to Cub Scouting,

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Aims and Methods

The Aims and Methodsof Scouting

1Learning ObjectivesUnderstand the underlying principles of Scouting

Realize how the Aims of Scouting apply to Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting and Venturing

Relate the Aims of Scouting to your lives and BSA responsibilitiesThe Presentation will lead participants to:

(have participant read)

2Todays youth

Think about young people you know who are currently in Cub Scouting, Boy Scouting, Varsity Scouting, or Venturing.

Think of these same youth ten years from now. Consider what they might be doing. Where they could be living. How will they be spending their time.

Take 2 or 3 minutes to write down (on the back of the Aims & Methods worksheet) some qualities that those young people will exhibit in the future that they have gained from their current Scouting experience.

(Dont flip slide until all are through writing).Qualities of Young PeopleSome qualities that people might see or hope their scouts will have in the future

Self MotivationHigh ExpectationsFocusInterest in the outdoorsTechnical skillsLeadership abilityCitizenship

Heres my list. Did you list some of the same qualities?Others?

(Discuss)4Lord Baden-Powell.Scouting is a game with a purpose.

Lord Baden-Powell said Scouting is a game with a purpose.

Aim of scouting is to help youth become better people and help them to fully realize their potential.

The game is what we see most; activities, service projects, outdoor adventures, meetings, etc. These are the methods that Scouting uses to guide its members toward worthwhile aims.

Aims of ScoutingCharacter development

Citizenship training

Mental & physical fitness

6Boy Scouting works towards three aims. They are the same at all levels of the program.

One is growth in moral strength and character. We may define this as what the boy is himself; his personal qualities, his values, his outlook.

A second is participating citizenship. Used broadly, citizenship means the boy's relationship to others. He comes to learn obligations to other people, to the society he lives in, and to the government that presides over that society.

A third aim of Boy Scouting is development of physical, mental, and emotional fitness. Fitness includes the body (well-tuned and healthy), the mind (able to think and solve problems), and the emotions (self-control, courage, and self-respect).

Methods of Cub ScoutingThe idealsThe denAdvancement planFamily involvementActivitiesHome/neighborhood centeredThe uniform

The methods are designed to accomplish these aims. Thus it is important that you know and use the methods of Boy Scouting. Other methods are good, but they may bring different results -- results quite different than we are seeking.

These are the methods of Cub Scouting(Have a participant read this slide)Methods of Boy Scouting and Varsity ScoutingThe idealsPatrol/squad methodAdvancementAssociation with adultsOutdoor activitiesPersonal growthLeadership developmentThe uniform

These are the methods of Boy Scouting and Varsity Scouting

(Have a participant read this)Methods of VenturingThe idealsGroup activitiesRecognitionAdult associationHigh adventureTeaching othersLeadershipCo-ed

These are the methods of Venturing.

(Have a participant read this.)

Notice anything different about Venturing verses the other programs? Less structured, member led, co-ed, the uniform part is missing.Methods of ScoutingCub ScoutingBoys grades 1-5

The IdealsDenAdvancementFamily InvolvementActivitiesHome & NeighborhoodcenteredUniform

Boy ScoutingBoys ages 11-17

The IdealsPatrolAdvancementAdult associationOutdoorsPersonal growthUniformLeadershipVenturingYoung men & women ages 14-20

The IdealsGroup activitiesRecognitionAdult associationHigh AdventureTeaching othersLeadershipThis is a comparison to illustrate the similarities of the four program areas. 10Ideals of ScoutingCub Scout Promise and Law of the PackScout Oath and LawVarsity Scout OathVenturing Oath

Underlying the aims and methods of the BSA is a solid foundation of ideals (above). The values upon which all of Scoutings programs are built.

Take a moment and list on your worksheets some specific ways that each program brings to life the aims, methods and ideals of Scouting.

Go over what they have written and facilitate a discussion relating to their ideas about Scoutings aims and values back to the young people they thought about at the beginning of the discussion and those who are currently not in Scouting but could benefit from this message.Bringing It All to LifeAimsMethodsIdeals

Bringing it all to life.The Aims, Methods and Ideals of Scouting have proven successful in guiding young men on the path to success for over 100 years.

Aims and Methods of ScoutingQuestions?13Patrol Meeting AgendaRoles and responsibilities of the patrol leader, assistant patrol leader, chaplain aide, and scribePatrol leader electionAppointment of the assistant patrol leader, scribe, and chaplain aideIntroduction of Start, Stop, ContinuePatrol totemIn a traditional Boy Scout troop, patrols are smaller units designed to provide members with a greater sense of belonging, more opportunities to experience leadership, and a practical framework for conducting the Troops program. The same is true, with varying levels of sophistication, for the dens of a Cub Scout pack, the squads of a Varsity Scout Team, and the teams of a Venturing crew.

A different member will serve each day as leader of the patrol, thus allowing each person to have at least one chance during a Wood Badge course to experience that leadership opportunity. In addition to assuming the traditional responsibilities of that office, patrol leaders will also assume responsibilities that encompass the larger goals of the course.

Role and Responsibilities of thePatrol Leader

Take leading role in planning and conducting patrol meetings and activitiesEncourage patrol members to fully participate in Wood Badge courseRepresent the patrol in PLCSet example, Scout Oath, Scout LawPractice leadership and team skills presented during Wood BadgeEnsure daily patrol self-assessments are carried out in timely mannerProvide patrol members with resources and information they need to succeedEmpower the patrol to become the best it can beEnsure patrol is prepared for all course presentations and activitiesRole and Responsibilities of theAssistant Patrol Leader

Assume responsibilities of patrol leader whenever PL is unable to do soEncourage patrol members to fully participate in Wood Badge courseAssist PL in empowering the patrol to become the best it cane beSet example, Scout Oath, Scout LawRole and Responsibilities of thePatrol Chaplain Aide

In concert with other patrols and ASM,

Learn resources available for religious observances during the course, make information available to patrolDevelop and help present the participants interfaith worship serviceAssist in conducting other religious observances during Wood BadgeSet example, Scout Oath, Scout Law

Role and Responsibilities of thePatrol Scribe

Provide interesting and timely material about patrol for Gillwell Gazette (guidelines?)Set example, Scout Oath, Scout Law

Role and Responsibilities of aPatrol Member

For a patrol to succeed as a team, each member must

Fully participate in Wood Badge course and achieve all they canPractice using team development skills introduced during Wood BadgeHelp patrol meet its obligations to fulfill assignments, including development and presentation of patrol projectSet example, Scout Oath, Scout LawHave Fun!Patrol ElectionElect a patrol leaderPatrol leader appoints an assistant patrol leaderThe Assistant Patrol Leader will become Patrol Leader the following dayEnter the names in the patrol position roster in the PL notebookPatrol ScribePatrol Chaplain Aide Cannot serve as PL on Day 2 or Day 6.Elect a patrol leaderPatrol leader appoints an assistant patrol leaderThe Assistant Patrol Leader will become Patrol Leader the following day he/she will then appoint an assistant patrol leaderEnter the names in the patrol position roster in the PL notebookPatrol Scribe can serve for the entire course or can rotatePatrol Chaplain Aide can serve for the entire course, but cannot serve as PL on Day 2 or Day 6 due to involvement with the interfaith worship serviceStart, Stop, ContinueStart What should the patrol be doing that will make things better?

Stop What should the patrol stop doing because it isnt helping?

Continue What is the patrols strength that is working well and should continue?

A key to effective team development is self assessment regularly measuring the morale and productivity of ones own group. The daily patrol self-assessment encourages course participants to do just that.

The patrol self-assessment tool can be used just as effectively in other team settings within and beyond Scouting district committees, church boards, camp staffs, business task forces, etc.

The daily patrol self-assessment measures the development and performance of the patrol over the preceding 24 hours.

The patrol self-assessments need not be shared with anyone outside the patrol. On the morning of Day 2, however, the troop guide may help facilitate the assessment process as patrol members work through it for the first time After that, the troop guide will not be involved in the assessment process unless specifically requested to do so by the patrol leader.

Patrol TotemA unique identity Its yours!

SR263Since the earliest days of Wood Badge, course participants have designed and developed totems to give themselves and their patrols a unique identity.

The patrol totem is the logo of that team. Patrol members design it themselves and decide how and when it will be used. In many cases, the course participants incorporate their totems into items that become take-home mementos of their Wood Badge experience.---Your totem design must be presented to the senior patrol leader for approval no later than the patrol leaders council meeting on Day 2.

Discuss hiding numbers, having each patrol member designated by an identifying line or dot.

For a patrol to succeed as a team, each member must

Fully participate in Wood Badge course and achieve all they canPractice using team development skills introduced during Wood BadgeHelp patrol meet its obligations to fulfill assignments, including development and presentation of patrol projectSet example, Scout Oath, Scout LawHave Fun!

Patrol ElectionsStart, Stop, ContinuePatrol Totem (due PLC on day 2)23

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