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Teaching and Learning Forum 15 NOVEMBER 2013 SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

Teaching and Learning Forum 15 NOVEMBER 2013 SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

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Text of Teaching and Learning Forum 15 NOVEMBER 2013 SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

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  • Teaching and Learning Forum 15 NOVEMBER 2013 SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
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  • The University of Western Australia Forum Objectives Exchange teaching experiences amongst SARE staff Discuss what teaching techniques work well, and what does not work well Draw generic lessons and draft guidelines for SARE staff Program: Three 10-minute presentations: teaching first year students (JF), block teaching (AM), new technologies and learning from high scoring units (MK) Discussion on T&L issues Review of key lessons
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  • Large class teaching reflections and changes November 2013
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  • An introduction to first year teaching
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  • -An academic that cares -Formative assessment structure -Options to miss an assessment -Student dont follow through on requests -High demand on staff -Lots of student support options -Student review of teaching -Screen recordings are effective (Coursera) A recap on first year teaching
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  • Equitable treatment of students Group sample size: 36 58 Common assessment v Tutor assessment
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  • Equitable treatment of students AssessmentT1T1 T2T2 T3T3 T4T4 T5T5 T6T6 Benchmark676162 5961 Group sample size: 36 58 Common assessment v Tutor assessment Table1. Mean mark by tutor (percentage)
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  • Equitable treatment of students AssessmentT1T1 T2T2 T3T3 T4T4 T5T5 T6T6 Benchmark676162 5961 Tutor mark 1665289645467 Tutor mark 2805784686961 Group sample size: 36 58 Common assessment v Tutor assessment Table1. Mean mark by tutor (percentage)
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  • -Weekly email communication -Formative and summative assessment -No avoiding time consuming assessment -45 minute teaching block? -Direct assessment drives learning -Initial impressions matter -Life long learning resources (recordings) Lessons from first year teaching
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  • -Requirements in later year units? -Level A or teaching only role ? -Internal or cross school co-ordination -Research v Teaching trade-off -Infrastructure limitations (rooms, LMS) -School maths resource page For discussion: teaching first year
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  • Block Teaching -ARE AMIN MUGERA.
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  • The University of Western Australia Block Teaching Committee Meeting Definition and scope of BT Supportive infrastructure - cost and time Pre-recorded lectures Flexibility - scope of BT Timing/enrolment - when to teach
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  • The University of Western Australia Traditional Teaching Schedule ECON3300 Agricultural Economics and Marketing 13 Weeks 3 hours per week of lectures Total lecture hours = 39 1 hour tutorial per week for 12 weeks Total contact hours = 51
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  • The University of Western Australia ECON5510 Applied Demand and Production Analysis AGRI4402 Agricultural Economics 5 teaching weeks : Wks 33, 35, 37, 39, 42 Two blocks of 3 hours per teaching week Total contact hours = 30 Feedback from Students Limited teaching time give more contact hours Timely feedback for assignments Clash with other units Not enough time to catch up with readings Provide online resources (lectures)
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  • The University of Western Australia ENVT4405 Development in Rural Areas 5 hours 4 weeks 10 hours per week 40 contact hours
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  • The University of Western Australia Feedback on Block Teaching Major complains Many contact hours per week Not enough time to keep up with readings Clash with other classes Long hours- draining, ineffective Not enough time to get feedback Positive feedback Student interaction through group activities
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  • The University of Western Australia Block Teaching Assumption student self directed learners Time to learn and understand Time for feedback What can and cannot be BT
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  • The University of Western Australia Cornell College One course at a time 18 class days Time: M, T, W ; 9-11; 1-3 Total contact hours = 72 8 blocks per year Liberal arts and sciences Training not for vocational or professional skills Video 1 Video Video 2 Video 2
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  • The University of Western Australia New technologies and Learning from high scoring units Assist/Prof Marit E. Kragt
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  • The University of Western Australia
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  • Democracy
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  • The University of Western Australia Centre for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning CATL BITEs: CATL BITEs Online in-class polling (student response systems) Online mark-up of student assignments Online interactive tutorials (PowerPoint based products) Online interactive tutorials (Stand alone products) Teaching with technology workshops: Teaching with technology workshops Teaching with technology an introduction to eLearning Designing a technology integrated unit/curriculum Enhancing assessment / learning / teaching with technology Curriculum development: Blended and online learning Curriculum development: Blended and online learning
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  • The University of Western Australia How do students react? Fun Flexible Modern Interactive Makes you more approachable Invites questions
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  • The University of Western Australia Interviews with high scoring (>3.5) units co-ordinators Neil Foley Policy & Governance (EART4412) Natasha Pauli Environmental Management (ENVT4404); Environmental Policy & Planning (PLNG2203) Andrew Williams Micro-economics, prices & markets (ECON1101) Veronica Huddleston Regional Development (EART3327)
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  • The University of Western Australia Lectures Always show how concepts are applied in the real world. Theory may be frontloaded (first two or three weeks) with lectures including a lot of practical applications Include many (current) examples e.g. through newspaper cuttings, internet sites, articles from The Economists etc. Never journal articles. Stories to show how the lecturer applies the learned material in, e.g. research, consultant work, government, etc. (varying with your background) Lectures are updated every year to reflect current state of knowledge, current examples and current literature Lecture slides always include a lot of pictures and images Make lectures relevant to students world (e.g. future work-place, local area, related to their courses) Online material to introduce the essential mathematics and calculus
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  • The University of Western Australia Labs and tutorials Visit tutorials at least once a semester Timely posting of material either at the start of semester or at least one week prior to the tute At the start of the tutorials go through concepts and questions that were received about last weeks material Tutorial participation or exercises as part of the assessment
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  • The University of Western Australia Resources and assessment Three of the units did not have a prescribed text but were based on lecture notes and supplementary readings Assessment predominantly focussed on application of theory Assessment a combination of reports, essays (e.g. of field trips or case studies), quizzes (true/false, MC, open-ended) and a final exam One co-ordinator used peer-marking of quizzes as learning approach (these are then re-marked by the lecturer) Students appreciate (a) detailed descriptions of the what is expected in the assignment; (b) early availability of the assessment descriptions; and (c) timely and plenty of feedback notes on their work
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  • The University of Western Australia Communication with students Unit outlines and LMS websites are extensive Most information directly in unit outline. Post additional materials well in advance Interaction with students through online LMS forum (Questions can be de-identified!! and are answered by lecturer in the forum) Sending student emails can go through Calista this will have all up-to-date enrolments Andrew communicates with students through a Facebook page Knowing students names makes a difference. Students like informal and personal interactions
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  • The University of Western Australia Lessons TIME All these co-ordinators put at least 2 days per week into teaching, more in the preparation stages of semester PERSONAL ATTENTION Interact personally with the students (directly, through emails, or through Facebook) e.g. knowing student names, and caring for your students CLARITY assessment guidelines and early posting of lab/tutorial exercises RELEVANCE Significant emphasis on real-world applications. How does the theory/concepts apply to the real world, and the future workforce?
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  • The University of Western Australia Teaching resources on the School website