Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP)

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Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP). An Introduction. What is reading?. Reading is much more than the decoding of black marks upon the page: it is a quest for meaning and one that requires the reader to be an active participant. English for Ages 5-16 (The Cox Report, 1989). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP)

Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP)An IntroductionJustine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityWhat is reading?Reading is much more than the decoding of black marks upon the page: it is a quest for meaning and one that requires the reader to be an active participant.

English for Ages 5-16 (The Cox Report, 1989)Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityPhonics: the most straightforward part of EnglishIt is self-contained (discrete).It is clearly structured (systematic)It is supported by a scheme providing the content, progression, assessment tools and ideas.There is a wealth of resources to help.It is skills based.Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityPhonics: what makes it seem difficult. The new technical vocabulary.It is a skill you as a reader do not use consciously.The current focus and emphasis on phonics.The use of a scheme.

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityWhat matters for the childrenTheir phonic input matches their needs.The skills they learn in the discrete phonics sessions are applied when they read and write. There is not a linear approach to learning to read those children still tackling decoding can also demonstrate more advanced reading skills.Any focus on phonics is balanced by the rest of the English / literacy curriculum.

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversitySome Key Statements to Understand There are around 44 phonemes in the English language.Letters are symbols (graphemes), which represent the sounds (phonemes) in words. A phoneme can be represented by a grapheme made up of one or more letters: c/a/t, k/ee/p, h/igh, th/r/ough.A phoneme can be spelt in more than one way. So one sound can have different representations: day, great, make, paper.Some graphemes represent more than one phoneme. So one spelling but more than one sound: bread, bead, steak. You need to teach the skill of blending the phonemes together in a word in order to be able to decode it. c-a-t cat.You need to teach the skill of segmenting each phoneme in a word in order to be able to spell it. cat c-a-t.

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church University++--Word recognitionGood language comprehension, poor word recognitionGood word recognition, good language comprehensionPoor word recognition, poor language comprehensionGood word recognition, poor language comprehensionLanguage comprehensionJustine Earl Canterbury Christ Church University7Two dimensions of reading: word recognition and language comprehensionFour possible outcomes: Good word recognition and good language comprehensionGood word recognition but poor language comprehensionPoor word recognition but good language comprehensionPoor word recognition and poor language comprehension

Allow time for staff to consider the four quadrants alongside their class list. They may be able to start thinking about whereabouts the children would be plotted on the graph.Some key terms to knowPhoneme: smallest unit of soundGrapheme: symbol which represents the phonemeGPCs: grapheme-phoneme correspondencesDigraphTrigraphAdjacent consonants /consonant clusterBlending for readingSegmenting for spelling

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonsc a t Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating the phonemes: phoneme framecatJustine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonsd o g Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonss t r u t Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonsch a t Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonsch ur ch Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemes: sound buttonss c r u n ch Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityIndicating phonemesh igh Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityMaking the long a phonemeayaia-esayrainmaketraySpain cakeplaysnail gameJustine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityMaking the long a phonemeaeieighaveineightRachelreinweight reignJustine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversitySome key terms to knowPhoneme: smallest unit of soundGrapheme: symbol which represents the phonemeGPCs: grapheme-phoneme correspondencesDigraphTrigraphAdjacent consonants /consonant clusterBlending for readingSegmenting for spelling

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityKey phonic knowledgeA phoneme can be represented by one or more lettersThe same phoneme can be represented in more than one way.The same spelling may represent more than one phoneme.A grapheme is the representation of the phoneme so may be more than one letter. Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church UniversityReading for pleasure and for lifehttp://www.literacytrust.org.uk/resources/videos/3858_reading_for_life_not_for_tests

Justine Earl Canterbury Christ Church University