SUSY at The Compression 2012-02-19¢  2 Persuasion Unusually,$Iam$not here$to$persuade$ you$of$anything$¢â‚¬â€œ

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of SUSY at The Compression 2012-02-19¢  2 Persuasion Unusually,$Iam$not here$to$persuade$...

  • SUSY at The Compression Frontier Tom  LeCompte  

    Argonne  Na*onal  Laboratory  

  • 2  

    Persuasion

    Unusually,  I  am  not   here  to  persuade   you  of  anything  –   other  than  that   some  ideas  are   maybe  worth   thinking  about.  

  • 3  

    Outline: Three Areas of Compression

      Compression  from  the  Higgs  Searches     Compressed  SUSY     The  future  –  and  where  our  compuDng  model  is  squeezing  the  physics  

    I  am  a  member  of  the  ATLAS  collaboraDon,  but  am  not  represenDng  them   today.    I  am  here  as  a  “phenomenolgist”.  

    I  would  much  rather  this  be  a  discussion  than  a  “lecture”.    Interrupt  me  as   much  as  you  like.  

  • 4  

    Part  I:  Compression  from  the  Higgs  

  • 5  

    CERN Seminar in December:

    These  plots  were  shown  at  the  CERN     “jamboree”*  in  December.  

       The  reacDon  of  some  of  the  community  was…  

    *  Derived  from  a  word  meaning  “a  big  headache.”  

  • 6  

    A 125 GeV Higgs is too heavy for SUSY!

  • 7  

    There is No Need To Panic:

      First,  the  experiments  are  not  saying  that  there  is  a  125  GeV  Higgs.       –  ATLAS:  there  is  a  window  between  115.5-­‐131  GeV   –  CMS:  there  is  a  window  between  114  (LEP)-­‐129  GeV  (now  127  GeV)   –  A  light  Higgs  can  be  anywhere  in  that  window.  

      Second,  trying  to  line  up  the  points  of  poorest  exclusion  between  ATLAS  and  CMS   implicitly  asks  the  wrong  quesDon.   –  Even  if  there  is  a  parDcle  present,  the  point  of  poorest  exclusion  is  not  in  general  at  the  

    center  of  mass  of  the  peak.  

    At  1σ,  a  SM  Higgs  can  be  almost  anywhere   in  the  non-­‐excluded  region.    At  2σ,  it  could   preby  much  be  anywhere.  

  • 8  

    More Reason Not To Panic…

      Third,  the  ATLAS  H    γγ  search  excess  is  1.5-­‐2.0x  what  one  expects  from  the  SM.     If  one  wants  to  interpret  it  as  a  Higgs,  it  leads  to  one  of  two  possibiliDes:   –  There  is  a  component  of  this  excess  that  is  an  upward  staDsDcal  fluctuaDon.    In  this  case,  

    the  inferred  mass  is  altered  by  this  fluctuaDon.    -­‐OR-­‐   –  This  is  a  non-­‐SM  Higgs.   –  In  either  case,  one  cannot  properly  apply  the  constraints  of  a  125  GeV  SM  Higgs  on  

    SUSY.  

      Finally  (and  this  will  lead  me  into  my  next  slide),  these  constraints  apply  to  the   MSSM,  and  there’s  more  to  SUSY  than  the  MSSSM.      

    We’re  going  to  have  to  wait  a  few  more   months  to  get  something  more  definite.       (Also  a  message  from  the  December  seminar)  

  • 9  

    More Reason Not To Panic…

      Third,  the  ATLAS  H    γγ  search  excess  is  1.5-­‐2.0x  what  one  expects  from  the  SM.     If  one  wants  to  interpret  it  as  a  Higgs,  it  leads  to  one  of  two  possibiliDes:   –  There  is  a  component  of  this  excess  that  is  an  upward  staDsDcal  fluctuaDon.    In  this  case,  

    the  inferred  mass  is  altered  by  this  fluctuaDon.    -­‐OR-­‐   –  This  is  a  non-­‐SM  Higgs.   –  In  either  case,  one  cannot  properly  apply  the  constraints  of  a  125  GeV  SM  Higgs  on  

    SUSY.  

      Finally  (and  this  will  lead  me  into  my  next  slide),  these  constraints  apply  to  the   MSSM,  and  there’s  more  to  SUSY  than  the  MSSSM.      

    We’re  going  to  have  to  wait  a  few  more   months  to  get  something  more  definite.       (Also  a  message  from  the  December  seminar)  

  • 10  

    Part  II:  Compressed  SUSY  

    Work  done  with  Steve  MarDn,  Northern  Illinois  University   Phys.Rev.D84:015004,2011  (hbp://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4304)  

    And  follow-­‐up  (hbp://arxiv.org/abs/1111.6897)  

  • 11  

    Some possibly unpopular thoughts

      SUSY  may  not  be  mSUGRA/CMSSM  

      SUSY  may  not  be  MSSM  

      SUSY  may  not  even  be  SUSY!   –  To  me,  “SUSY”  represents  an  experimental  search  for  a  family  of  topologies  that  are    

    predicted  in  supersymmetric  theories,  but  may    have  nothing  to  do  with  them.   –  A  common  characterisDc  is  missing  energy  from  undetected  weakly  or  non-­‐interacDng  

    parDcles.   •  These  may  or  may  not  have  something  to  do  with  Dark  Maber  

    –  Events  can  be  characterized  by  what’s  going  on  with  the  rest  of  the  event:  leptons,  jets,   etc.   •  These  may  or  may  not  give  you  peaks  in  an  invariant  mass  distribuDon,  but  they  are  

    likely  to  have  some  disDnguishing  kinemaDcs.  

  • 12  

    Compressed SUSY

      mSUGRA  has  great  big  gaps  between  the   masses.  

      This  gives  you  energeDc  leptons,  jets  and   usually  lots  of  missing  ET.  

      It’s  almost  as  if  this  was  designed  to  be   easy  to  find  at  colliders.  

      By  compressing  the  spectrum  you  usually   (more  on  this  later)  get  less  energeDc   objects,  less  missing  ET  etc.  

      The  signal  looks  more  like  the   background.  

      Hard  QCD  radiaDon  can  be  important.  

  • 13  

    The “Easy” Thing To Do

      The  LHC  experiments  have  already  published  limits  on  mSUGRA.         Can  these  limits  be  adapted  to  more  compressed  spectra?  

      Step  #1  is  to  come  up  with  explicit  compressed  models:  

    –  c  =  0  is  mSUGRA-­‐like   –  c=  1  is  total  compression  (gauginos  degenerate)  

    Here  “easy”  means   “without  a  dedicated   search”.  

    There  is  nothing  magical  about  these  choices;  our   goal  was  to  come  up  with  a  spectrum  that  was   very  different  than  mSUGRA.  

  • 14  

    Getting acceptances

      Step  #2  is  to  calculate  acceptances  for  these  models.  

      We  used  MadGraph/MadEvent  (generaDon)  +  Pythia  (fragmentaDon)  +  PGS   (simulaDon  of  an  ATLAS-­‐like  detector)     –  ATLAS  made  public  a  number  of  their  own  points  that  we  could  tune  and  compare  to.    

    This  was  extraordinarily  useful,  and  I’d  like  to  encourage  this  for  every  analysis.   –  Typically,  we  were  good  to  ~15%  or  beber,  and  the  limitaDon  seemed  to  be  the  staDsDcs  

    on  the  ATLAS  side  (more  later)   –  Cross-­‐secDons  were  normalized  to  Prospino  cross-­‐secDons  

      We  ran  four  producDon  models:   –  Gluino/gluino,  gluino/squark,  squark/squark,  and  events  with  stops  and/or  sboboms