Subordinating conjunctions - Katy Semester/4th Grading...A. Read the sentences. Then, write the subordinating conjunctions in each sentence. Example: You can go to the park after you finish your chores. Answer: after

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  • SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS

  • SENTENCE- SUBJECT, VERB, AND COMPLETE THOUGHT (S/V/CT)

    3 types of sentences:

    1. Simple Sentence - (S/V/CT) - a single independent clause

    2. Compound Sentence - (S/V/CT) ,FANBOYS/; (S/V/CT)

    3. Complex Sentence - (S/V/CT) SUBCON (Subordinating Conjunction)

    ( S/V/CT )

  • SENTENCE- SUBJECT, VERB, AND COMPLETE THOUGHT (S/V/CT)

    1. Simple Sentence - (S/V/CT) - a single independent clause

    Example: The boy ran

    2. Compound Sentence - (S/V/CT) ,FANBOYS/; (S/V/CT)

    two or more main (independent) clauses joined by a comma and coordinating

    conjunction (, FANBOYS)

    For/ And/ Nor/ But/ Or/ Yet/So

    or semicolon (;)

    Example: I forgot my lunch, but Mom ran to the bus with it.

    Example: The spider is not an insect; it is an arachnid.

  • SENTENCE- SUBJECT, VERB, AND COMPLETE THOUGHT (S/V/CT)

    3. Complex Sentence - (S/V/CT) SUBCON (Subordinating Conjunction) ( S/V/CT)

    one main ( independent) clause and one or more subordinate(dependent) clauses

    joined/introduced by a subordinating conjunction (SUBCON) Writing Coach pp. 359-360

    There are usually 24 subordinating conjunctions (SUBCONS):

    after/although/ as/ as if/ as long as/ as soon as/ as though

    because/ before/even though/ if/ in order that

    since/ so that/ than/though/ till

    unless/ until

    when/ whenever /where /wherever / while

  • MAIN RULES TO REMEMBER:

    When the subordinate (dependent) clause comes at the beginning of a sentence, it must be separated from the

    main (independent) clause with a comma.

    Example: Because the day is so important, many of the festivities are official.

    When the main (independent) clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, no comma is necessary.

    Example: Many of the festivities are official because the day is so important.

    A main (independent) clause has its own subject and verb and can stand alone as a complete thought.

    Example: Many of the festivities are official. S= Many/V=are/CT

    A subordinate (dependent) clause has its own subject and verb but can't stand alone as a complete thought.

    Example: Because the day is so important. S= day/V=is/CT

  • MAIN RULES TO REMEMBER:

    When the subordinate (dependent) clause comes at the beginning of a sentence, it must be separated from

    the main (independent) clause with a comma.

    Example: Because the day is so important, many of the festivities are official.

    When the main (independent) clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, no comma is necessary.

    Example: Many of the festivities are official because the day is so important.

    A main (independent) clause has its own subject and verb and can stand alone as a complete thought.

    Example: Many of the festivities are official. S= Many/V=are/CT

    A subordinate (dependent) clause has its own subject and verb but can't stand alone as a complete

    thought.

    Example: Because the day is so important. S= day/V=is/CT

  • HOW WOULD THIS LOOK ON OUR REVISING & EDITING TESTS?

    What is the BEST way to combine sentences 5 and 6?

    F I opened the front door, and there she was.

    G I opened the front door, there she was.

    H I opened the front door although there she was.

    J Even though I opened the front door, there she was.

  • GRAMMAR REVISING AND EDITING TEST TAKING TIPS - 101

    If you see this stem as one of your test questions,

    What is the BEST way to REVISE sentence 5?

    What is the BEST way to rewrite the ideas in sentence 5?

    What revision, if any, is needed in sentence 5?

    You should complete the following steps:

    Next to each answer choice put the following menu: S/F/RO

    If you label any of the answer choices as F or RO, strike a line through that choice to eliminate it as a

    possible answer.

    Then proceed to consider only those answer choices that are not labeled as F or RO.

    Carefully read the remaining answer choices to be sure that the arrangement of the words does not change

    the meaning of the original sentence.

  • WE DORead the sentences. Then, label each sentence complex or not complex.

    Example: Kim had never had a pet, so her parents gave her one for her birthday. - not complex

    1. Before she entered a room, the nurse checked to see that she had everything.

    2. Mom sent me to the store to buy noodles and celery.

    3. Until the Johnsons get home, Marcie is caring for their cats.

    4. We had better hurry, or we will miss the train.

    5. I did not pass the test, so I have to take it over.

    6. Janine trained hard for the race though she did not expect to win.

    7. Last week we visited five cities in three states.

    8. Because Celine was celebrating her birthday, we all brought gifts.

    9. If you get an A on the test, you may go to the fair.

    10. We should have reached Grandmother's house by now.

  • WE DORead the sentences. Combine the two sentences in each item, and write a compound or a complex

    sentence. Identify your sentence as compound or complex.

    Example: The tickets are expensive. All of them are sold.

    Answer: The tickets are expensive, yet all of them are sold. - compound

    1. The television star saw the photographers. He waved.

    2. We have a dog and two kittens. We adopted them from the shelter.

    3. My brother joined the Army. He is in training for nine weeks.

    4. Nicholas started telling the same old stories. Olivia left.

    5. Timothy read two books by Cynthia Rylant. She is his favorite writer.

  • WE DORead the sentences. Combine the two sentences in each item, and write a compound or a complex

    sentence. Identify your sentence as compound or complex.

    Example: The tickets are expensive. All of them are sold.

    Answer: The tickets are expensive, yet all of them are sold. - compound

    6. Sondra comes over every day. She must feel at home here.

    7. Logan's voice shook. He was cold and nervous.

    8. The door slammed. There was no wind.

    9. We lost the championship game. It was close until the ninth inning.

    10. I did not go rock climbing yesterday. I did not go hiking either.

  • YOU DO

    A. Read the sentences. Then, write the subordinating conjunctions in each sentence.

    Example: You can go to the park after you finish your chores.

    Answer: after

    ***Complete #1-10 on notebook paper.

    B. Read each simple sentence. Then, write a new compound or complex sentence by adding

    to it.

    Example: Daisy has never gotten straight A's.

    Answer: Although Daisy has never gotten straight A's, she could do it.

    ***Complete #1-10 on the same sheet of notebook paper.

  • YOU DO

    Complete the Texas Test Warm-Up Quiz using the test-taking strategies.

    EXTENSION ACTIVITY: Create a tune to memorize the 24 most common

    subordinating conjunctions (see the chart on page 359).

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