SRCL California State Plan, January 30, 2013 - Reading ... Resource Specialist, Pasadena Unified School

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    CALIFORNIA STRIVING READERS COMPREHENSIVE LITERACY PLAN

    A GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

  • Table of Contents

    Acknowledgments………………………………………………………………………………… 3

    Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………….. 6

    California‘s Children and Students……………………………………………………………… 15

    Birth through Age Five…………………………………………………………………………. … 29

    Kindergarten through Grade Five ………………………………………………………………. 60

    Grade Six through Grade Eight…………………………………………………………………. 107

    Grade Nine through Grade Twelve……………………………………………………………… 157

    Resources and References……………………………………………………………………… 204

  • Acknowledgements

    The California Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy (SRCL) Plan is intended as a guide for educators as they work to

    improve literacy instruction and practices in their districts and schools. The plan addresses learners from infancy through

    high school. The plan was developed by a literacy team appointed by the State Board of Education (SBE) and the State

    Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Torlakson. Members of the team are:

    Glen Thomas Chairman of SRCL Team, Former Secretary of Education, California; and Retired Educator

    Aida Molina Member, California State Board of Education, Assistant Superintendent, Bakersfield City School District

    Marilyn Astore Consultant, Early Learning, Sacramento County Office of Education; Retired Assistant Superintendent of Instructional Support Services, Sacramento County Office of Education

    Norma Baker Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Southern California; former Director of Elementary Mathematics, Los Angeles Unified School District; and Elementary School Principal

    Nancy Brynelson Co-Director, California State University Center for the Advancement of Reading

    Stephanie Burrus Literacy Specialist Teacher, Los Angeles County Office of Education

    Sandra Ceja Director, Reading/Language Arts and Mathematics, San Diego County Office of Education

    Bessie Condos Youth Services Specialist Librarian, California State Library

    Diane Haager Professor, Special Education and Counseling, California State University, Los Angeles

    Kenji Hakuta Lee J. Jacks Professor of Education, Stanford University

    Kathy Harris Third Grade Teacher and Vice President, Piner-Olivet Educators Association, Piner-Olivet Union School District

    Whitcomb Hayslip

    Retired Assistant Superintendent, Early Childhood Education, Los Angeles Unified School District

  • Carla B. Herrera District Program Specialist, English Learner Programs and Head Start Education Coordinator, ABC Unified School District

    Diane Innes Resource Specialist, Pasadena Unified School District

    Daly Jordan- Koch Educator and California Teachers Association, Chair of Curriculum and Instruction Committee

    Michael Kamil Professor Emeritus, Adolescent Literacy Expert, Stanford University

    Dawnelle Knight Elementary Instructional Coach, Inglewood Unified School District

    Zella Knight Parent Representative, Los Angeles Unified School District

    Nancy Kotkosky Coordinator, English-Language Arts and Social Studies, Los Angeles Unified School District

    Gretchen Laue Director, University of California, Professional Development Institute

    Jim Morris Superintendent, Fremont Unified School District

    Gisela O'Brien English Learner Specialist, Los Angeles Unified School District

    James Orihuela National Board Certified Teacher, Spanish Language Arts; and Milken Educator, Long Beach Unified School District

    Michel Romero Superintendent, Local District 8, Los Angeles Unified School District

    Judy Sanchez Project Director, California Preschool Instructional Network, Region 11, Los Angeles County Office of Education

    Felicity Swerdlow High School Principal, Santa Ana Unified School District

    Kou Vang Curriculum Specialist, Reading and Language Arts, Sacramento County Office of Education

    Marlene Zepeda Professor, College of Health and Human Services, California State University, Los Angeles

  • A special note of thanks is extended to State Board of Education members and staff: Michael Kirst, President; Sue Burr,

    Executive Director; Patricia De Cos, Deputy Executive Director; Jill Rice, Assistant Legal Counsel, and Beth Rice,

    Consultant.

    Appreciation is also expressed to Deb Sigman, Deputy Superintendent, Curriculum and Instruction Branch and Lupita

    Alcala, Deputy Superintendent, Instruction & Learning Support Branch of the California Department of Education (CDE),

    for their leadership and guidance in the development of this plan. The following CDE directors and managers coordinated

    the overall process for developing and revising the SRCL Plan:

    Phil Lafontaine, Director, Professional Learning Support Division

    Camille Maben, Director, Child Development Division

    Carrie Roberts, Administrator; Literacy, History, and Arts Leadership Office

    Desiree Soto, Administrator, Child Development Division

    The following CDE staff members contributed to the process of completing the SRCL Plan:

    Aileen Allison-Zarea Roxane Fidler

    Mary Autry Stacey Greer

    Laura Bridges Phyllis Hallam

    Christopher Dowell Jerry Winthrop

    The work of the SRCL team was supported by Jan Agee of WestEd who edited the draft plan.

  • Introduction In 2010, the California State Board of Education (SBE) adopted the California Common Core State Standards for English-

    Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects for Kindergarten through Grade

    Twelve (hereinafter referred to as the CCSS for ELA). The purpose of the new standards, developed at the national level

    in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts, is to provide rigorous and challenging standards for all

    students, regardless of background, to achieve high levels of literacy for college and career success. In 2012, the SBE

    also adopted the California English Language Development (ELD) Standards, replacing California‘s 1997 ELD standards.

    The new California ELD Standards are fully aligned with the CCSS for ELA.

    The CCSS for ELA promote an exciting approach to effective teaching and deep learning—to merge school and the real

    world for authentic purposes and applications of literacy—with an emphasis on twenty-first (21st) century skills of

    creativity, communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and innovative uses of technology. Successful implementation of

    the new standards calls for enhanced professional learning for educators, new teacher preparation requirements,

    research-based instructional practices, new curricula (both print and digital), use of data analysis to inform instruction, and

    more effective use of technology.

    Technology increases the intensity and complexity of skills needed within learning environments and requires a literate

    student to possess a wide range of abilities and competencies—from reading, writing, and collaborating in person and

    online, to participating in virtual classrooms using various modalities of communication. The National Council of Teachers

    of English‘s Definition of 21st Century Literacies establishes essential knowledge and skills that twenty-first century

    readers and writers must possess (NCTE 2012):

     Proficiency with the tools of technology

     Ability to build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally

     Ability to design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes

     Ability to manage, analyze and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information

     Ability to create, critique, and evaluate multi-media texts

     Ability to attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments

  • Twenty-first century literacy encompasses society‘s increasing reliance on technology for communication. The Workforce

    Investment Act of 1998 defines literacy in English as ―an individual's ability to read, write, speak in English, compute and

    solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job, in the family of the individual and in society‖

    (LINCS 2012). This broader view of literacy encompasses more than the traditional concept of literacy as simply an

    individual's ability to read. California‘s Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy (SRCL) Plan includes all aspects of

    language and literacy for college and career readiness, emphasizing the CCSS for ELA and incorporating the four

    domains of communication—reading, writing, speaking, and listening—on a continuum of learning from birth through

    grade twelve.

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