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702 Medical Societies. SOCIETY OF MEDICAL OFFICERS OF HEALTH : NAVAL, MILITARY, AND AIR FORCE HYGIENE GROUP. THE first meeting of the new Group was held at the house of the society, 1; Upper Montague-street, London, on Sept. 24th, 40 officers and ex-officers being present. Sir JOHN GOODWIN, who provisionally occupied the chair, wished the group a future full of usefulness and success, and emphasised the great benefits which its existence would create by developing and increasing the liaison between officers of the- Regular and Territorial Forces and civil medical officers, all of whose duties were directed towards the improvement of public health. After the election of Professor H. R. KENWOOD as President of the group he invited the Director-General to do honour to the group by remaining in the chair throughout the meeting. ° A letter was read from Lieutenant-Colonel F. E. Fremantle, M.P., President-elect of the society, in which he said that many who had served abroad would be glad’to revive an interchange of experience. The system and spirit, he added, learnt in the army, by which a man had to prove the practical value not only of his actions but of his actual advice, was of immense value to his work in civil life. Professor KENWOOD referred to his long connexion with the Army Medical Department, and spoke of the great value which must in the future arise as a result of the discussion of subjects affecting the common con- ditions of health in the Services and in civil life. Brigadier-General W. W. 0. BEVERIDGE then gave the review of Disinfection and Disinfestation in the Field, which appears in full at the front of our present issue. The lecture was illustrated throughout by excellent photographs on lantern slides, diagrams, and models lent by Lieutenant-Colonel P. S. Lelean, Professor of Hygiene at the Royal Army Medical College. Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. WARRACK, Port of London Sanitary Authority, referring to the extremely efficient manner in which enormous numbers of soldiers, prior to their return to Britain after the armistice, were disin- fested at the different French ports, made the statement that on only three of many transports arriving at the Thames were louse-infested men discovered.-Captain C. B. Moss-BLUNDELL, C.M.O., Huntingdon, made refer- ence to the use of pentasulphide of calcium as an efficient cure of scabies.-General BEVERIDGE, in reply, agreed that the chemical was invaluable, but under service conditions its use was not by any means a practical proposition. Chemicals are bulky and heavy, and make a great demand on the transport services, and for these reasons could not be considered. The PRESIDENT raised the point, in speaking of a new form of portable steam disinfector designed by Colonel Lelean, as to whether there was penetration into the centre of tightly packed kits.-Colonel LELEAN assured the meeting that cultures of Shiga’s bacillus or Klebs- Lomer’s bacillus placed in the centre of the kits were sterilised after the passage of steam. The malic acid test was also used with success. A temperature of 102° C. was recorded by means of the thermo-electric couple. Election of 0ee?’s. The following office-bearers were elected :- Vice-Presidents: Major-General Sir W. G. Macpherson, Brigadier- General Sir Wm. Horrocks, Colonel Sir G. Sims Woodhead, Brigadier-General W. W. 0. Beveridge, Air-Commodore M. H. G. Fell, Surgeon-Commander R. St. G. S. Bond, Colonel G. S. Elliston. Committee.-Navy: : Surgeon-Commander R. St. G. S. Bond, Surgeon-Commander R.J.MaoEeown. Regular Army : Lieutenant- Colonel W. Clayton Smales, Lieutenant-Colonel E. P. Sewell. Air Force : Squadron-Leader A. Grant, Squadron-Leader P. M. Keane. Territorial Force : Lieutenant-Colonel P. Caldwell Smith, Captain S. H. Daukes. Temporary commissions : Captain A. B. McMaster, Major J. H. Peek. The committee has power to add two members. Representative of the Group on the Council of the Society.- Colonel H. W. Grattan. The Honorary Secretary of the group is Major W. N. W. Kennedy, Town Hall, Croydon, who will be glad to receive names of intending members. The membership of the group already exceeds 70. Reviews and Notices of Books. INDUSTRIAL COLONIES AND VILLAGE SETTLEMENTS FOR THE CONSUMPTIVE. By Sir G. SIMS WooDHEAD, K.B.E., V.D., M.A., M.D., LL.D., and P. C. VARRIER-JONES, M.A., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. With preface by Sir CLIF’FORD ALLBUTT. Cambridge University Press. 1920. Pp. 152. 10s. 6d. INDUSTRIAL colonies for consumptives have been subjected to so much overt shelling and covert sniping that it is high time the scattered defences were collected and organised. The authors have unfortu- nately not put their case before the public in a single work written for the occasion; their book consists mainly of a collection of papers already published at odd intervals and subsequently revised. The result of this labour-saving device on the part of the authors is to add to the labours of the reader, who will find the principal theses considerably diversified and diluted. One of the most attractive features of this book is the earnest attempt shown to comprehend the working man’s point of view. The - authors denounce the common practice of regarding the working-class consumptive as a slacker because his actual vigour does not tally with a robust exterior. His reputation for slacking probably depends not only on bodily weakness, but on his attitude towards the monotonous and irksome work to which he is often set at sanatoriums. As the authors point out, it is just as easy to grade useful as useless work, and the working man objects very strongly and naturally to labour savouring of the treadmill. It is also recognised that work in a colony must primarily be remunerative to the patient, not to the colony, and that any attempt to exploit consumptive labour must be nipped in the bud. The results so far of the Cambridgeshire After-Care Association’s work are almost too good to be convincing. During the period under review-three years-52 patients in the first and second stages have been assisted ; only one has died, the others at the time of writing (November, 1917) were all engaged in remunerative work. Whydonottheauthors bring these figures up to date ? It is not anticipated that non-infectious, early, and able-bodied cases will remain longer in the colony than is necessary for the recovery of health and working capacity, but the chronic sputum-positive case with a 50 per cent. working capacity will, it is hoped, settle down. Much of the book is devoted to an analysis of the psychology of the consumptive, but the consumptive reader will more than once ask himself the question: Do the authors really understand the "true inwardness" of the consumptive? The bitter pill of segregation is sugar-coated, but will not the recipient lick off the sugar and then refuse to swallow it? The authors reiterate the tragic fate of the working man succumbing to tuberculosis without State aid, and the picture they draw is as true as it is gloomy. But they have hardly gauged the British working man’s individualism, his attachment to any kind of hovel which he has learnt to call home. The proof of, the pudding is in the eating, and it is probable that if industrial colonies are ever to prove a success the sponsors of the Papworth Colony should make them one. After all, the fate of such a colony depends primarily on its head, and the wisest words in the whole book are to be found in the closing sentence of the preface by Sir Clifford Allbutt. " Whosoever undertakes to follow in the same way, and proposes to start a colony, let him first find the man." DIAGNOSTISCHER LEITFADEN FIJR SEKRET- UND BLUTUNTERSUCHUNGEN. Second edition. By C. S. ENGEL. Leipzig: Georg Thieme. 1920. Pp. xv. + 303. 12s. THE second edition of this work covers much the same ground as does an English manual of clinical pathology. Part I. deals with practical laboratory details, such as the use of the microscope, culture

SOCIETY OF MEDICAL OFFICERS OF HEALTH : NAVAL, MILITARY, AND AIR FORCE HYGIENE GROUP

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Medical Societies.SOCIETY OF MEDICAL OFFICERS OF HEALTH :

NAVAL, MILITARY, AND AIR FORCEHYGIENE GROUP.

THE first meeting of the new Group was held at thehouse of the society, 1; Upper Montague-street, London,on Sept. 24th, 40 officers and ex-officers being present.

Sir JOHN GOODWIN, who provisionally occupied thechair, wished the group a future full of usefulness andsuccess, and emphasised the great benefits which itsexistence would create by developing and increasing theliaison between officers of the- Regular and TerritorialForces and civil medical officers, all of whose dutieswere directed towards the improvement of public health.

After the election of Professor H. R. KENWOOD as

President of the group he invited the Director-Generalto do honour to the group by remaining in the chairthroughout the meeting. °

A letter was read from Lieutenant-Colonel F. E.Fremantle, M.P., President-elect of the society, inwhich he said that many who had served abroad wouldbe glad’to revive an interchange of experience. Thesystem and spirit, he added, learnt in the army, bywhich a man had to prove the practical value not onlyof his actions but of his actual advice, was of immensevalue to his work in civil life.Professor KENWOOD referred to his long connexion

with the Army Medical Department, and spoke of thegreat value which must in the future arise as a resultof the discussion of subjects affecting the common con-ditions of health in the Services and in civil life.Brigadier-General W. W. 0. BEVERIDGE then gave the

review of Disinfection and Disinfestation in the Field,which appears in full at the front of our present issue.The lecture was illustrated throughout by excellentphotographs on lantern slides, diagrams, and modelslent by Lieutenant-Colonel P. S. Lelean, Professor of

Hygiene at the Royal Army Medical College.Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. WARRACK, Port of London

Sanitary Authority, referring to the extremely efficientmanner in which enormous numbers of soldiers, prior totheir return to Britain after the armistice, were disin-fested at the different French ports, made the statementthat on only three of many transports arriving at theThames were louse-infested men discovered.-CaptainC. B. Moss-BLUNDELL, C.M.O., Huntingdon, made refer-ence to the use of pentasulphide of calcium as an efficientcure of scabies.-General BEVERIDGE, in reply, agreedthat the chemical was invaluable, but under serviceconditions its use was not by any means a practicalproposition. Chemicals are bulky and heavy, andmake a great demand on the transport services, and forthese reasons could not be considered.The PRESIDENT raised the point, in speaking of a new

form of portable steam disinfector designed by ColonelLelean, as to whether there was penetration into thecentre of tightly packed kits.-Colonel LELEAN assuredthe meeting that cultures of Shiga’s bacillus or Klebs-Lomer’s bacillus placed in the centre of the kits weresterilised after the passage of steam. The malic acidtest was also used with success. A temperature of 102° C.was recorded by means of the thermo-electric couple.

Election of 0ee?’s.The following office-bearers were elected :-Vice-Presidents: Major-General Sir W. G. Macpherson, Brigadier-

General Sir Wm. Horrocks, Colonel Sir G. Sims Woodhead,Brigadier-General W. W. 0. Beveridge, Air-Commodore M. H. G.Fell, Surgeon-Commander R. St. G. S. Bond, Colonel G. S. Elliston.Committee.-Navy: : Surgeon-Commander R. St. G. S. Bond,

Surgeon-Commander R.J.MaoEeown. Regular Army : Lieutenant-Colonel W. Clayton Smales, Lieutenant-Colonel E. P. Sewell. AirForce : Squadron-Leader A. Grant, Squadron-Leader P. M. Keane.Territorial Force : Lieutenant-Colonel P. Caldwell Smith, CaptainS. H. Daukes. Temporary commissions : Captain A. B. McMaster,Major J. H. Peek. The committee has power to add two members.Representative of the Group on the Council of the Society.-

Colonel H. W. Grattan.The Honorary Secretary of the group is Major W. N. W.

Kennedy, Town Hall, Croydon, who will be glad toreceive names of intending members. The membershipof the group already exceeds 70.

Reviews and Notices of Books.INDUSTRIAL COLONIES AND VILLAGE SETTLEMENTS

FOR THE CONSUMPTIVE.

By Sir G. SIMS WooDHEAD, K.B.E., V.D., M.A.,M.D., LL.D., and P. C. VARRIER-JONES, M.A.,M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. With preface by Sir CLIF’FORDALLBUTT. Cambridge University Press. 1920.

Pp. 152. 10s. 6d.INDUSTRIAL colonies for consumptives have been

subjected to so much overt shelling and covert snipingthat it is high time the scattered defences were

collected and organised. The authors have unfortu-

nately not put their case before the public in a singlework written for the occasion; their book consistsmainly of a collection of papers already published at oddintervals and subsequently revised. The result of thislabour-saving device on the part of the authors is to addto the labours of the reader, who will find the principaltheses considerably diversified and diluted. One of themost attractive features of this book is the earnestattempt shown to comprehend the working man’s pointof view. The - authors denounce the common practiceof regarding the working-class consumptive as a slackerbecause his actual vigour does not tally with a robustexterior. His reputation for slacking probably dependsnot only on bodily weakness, but on his attitudetowards the monotonous and irksome work to whichhe is often set at sanatoriums. As the authors pointout, it is just as easy to grade useful as useless work,and the working man objects very strongly and

naturally to labour savouring of the treadmill. It isalso recognised that work in a colony must primarilybe remunerative to the patient, not to the colony, andthat any attempt to exploit consumptive labour mustbe nipped in the bud. The results so far of the

Cambridgeshire After-Care Association’s work are

almost too good to be convincing. During the periodunder review-three years-52 patients in the first andsecond stages have been assisted ; only one has died,the others at the time of writing (November, 1917) wereall engaged in remunerative work. Whydonottheauthorsbring these figures up to date ? It is not anticipatedthat non-infectious, early, and able-bodied cases willremain longer in the colony than is necessary for therecovery of health and working capacity, but thechronic sputum-positive case with a 50 per cent.

working capacity will, it is hoped, settle down. Muchof the book is devoted to an analysis of the psychologyof the consumptive, but the consumptive reader willmore than once ask himself the question: Do theauthors really understand the "true inwardness" ofthe consumptive? The bitter pill of segregation is

sugar-coated, but will not the recipient lick off the

sugar and then refuse to swallow it? The authorsreiterate the tragic fate of the working man succumbingto tuberculosis without State aid, and the picture theydraw is as true as it is gloomy. But they have hardlygauged the British working man’s individualism, hisattachment to any kind of hovel which he has learntto call home. The proof of, the pudding is in theeating, and it is probable that if industrial colonies areever to prove a success the sponsors of the PapworthColony should make them one. After all, the fate ofsuch a colony depends primarily on its head, and thewisest words in the whole book are to be found in theclosing sentence of the preface by Sir Clifford Allbutt." Whosoever undertakes to follow in the same way, andproposes to start a colony, let him first find the man."

DIAGNOSTISCHER LEITFADEN FIJR SEKRET- UND

BLUTUNTERSUCHUNGEN.Second edition. By C. S. ENGEL. Leipzig: GeorgThieme. 1920. Pp. xv. + 303. 12s.

THE second edition of this work covers much thesame ground as does an English manual of clinicalpathology. Part I. deals with practical laboratorydetails, such as the use of the microscope, culture