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OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT CURRICULUM GUIDE SOCIAL STUDIES Kindergarten Office of Quality Assurance and Curriculum Support Guyla Hendricks, Chief Officer

SOCIAL STUDIES Kindergarten COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT CURRICULUM GUIDE SOCIAL STUDIES Kindergarten Office of Quality Assurance and Curriculum …

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OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

CURRICULUM GUIDE

SOCIAL STUDIES

Kindergarten

Office of Quality Assurance and Curriculum Support Guyla Hendricks, Chief Officer

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 2

CONTENTS

Mission Statement .................................................................................................................................................................. 3

Suggestions for Implementing Curriculum Guides .............................................................................................................. 3

Florida Department of Education Essential Website................................................................................................... 3

OCSD Curriculum and Pacing Guide Overview .................................................................................................................. 4

Quarterly Benchmarks ............................................................................................................................................................ 5

Reading Standards for Informational Text K–5. .................................................................................................................. 7

Grade-level Curriculum Guide ............................................................................................................................................... 7

Quarter 1 .......................................................................................................................... 8

Quarter 2 ........................................................................................................................ 14

Quarter 3 ........................................................................................................................ 21

Quarter 4 ........................................................................................................................ 27

Reading Rainbow Selections Elementary Social Studies.......................................................................................... 30

Topic Requirements by Statute ........................................................................................................................................... 31

Social Studies K-5 Websites and Resources .................................................................................................................... 32

Additional Resources That Encompass All Units .............................................................................................................. 33

Additional Literature by Theme ........................................................................................................................................... 34

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 3

Mission Statement Okaloosa County teachers are committed to the teaching of social studies in accordance with the highest state and national st andards. We endorse the position of

the Florida Council for the Social Studies which states “Florida’s public schools have the responsibility for creating an informed and active citizenry. This goal

requires our students to receive a firm foundation in each of the four major areas represented in the Sunshine State Standard s for social studies-history,

government/civics, economics, and geography.” We further recognize that our students must learn about our nation’s heritage and that they pos sess the essential

economic, civic, geographic, and historical knowledge to equip them for their future responsibilities as citizen s of Florida and the United States of America.

Suggestions for Implementing Curriculum Guides The role of the teacher is to:

Teach students the Next Generation and Common Core Standards as dictated by state law for their grade level.

Provide learning-rich classroom activities that teach the benchmarks in depth.

Enhance the curriculum by using resources and instructional technology.

Differentiate instruction by varying methods of instruction and assessment.

Regularly administer assessment to include higher-level questions, and performance task assessment.

In addition, teachers should:

Collaborate with other grade-level teachers to maximize school resources and teacher expertise.

Consult with other grade-levels to define absolute skill goals for each grade level.

Document questions and suggestions for improvement of the curriculum guide.

Integrate Social Studies with the Reading curriculum.

Consider applying for a grant to support project-based learning for their school.

Teachers may substitute a reading selection of their choice in lieu of one listed in the quarterly description if the selection aligns to the

same set of benchmarks.

Florida Department of Education Essential Website http://www.floridastandards.org/Standards/FLStandardSearch.aspx

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 4

OCSD Curriculum and Pacing Guide Overview

This document provides a Social Studies curriculum and pacing guide. It is designed to help teachers to efficiently pace the delivery of quality instruction for each nine-week period.

Purpose: This guide was created by a team of grade-level teachers to correlate to the Next Generation and Common Core Standards with the goal of providing teachers ready access to resources for teaching those new standards and a pace for accomplishing benchmark mastery. Description: The OCSD Social Studies Curriculum Guide specifies the social studies content to be covered within each nine-week instructional

period. This guide identifies Next Generation and Common Core Standards Benchmarks. Furthermore, it allows teachers to input information specific to their students or school needs.

Top Block – Strand, Standard, Essential Questions, Vocabulary, Primary literature, Activities Related to Primary Literature Column One – Benchmark

Lists the specific Benchmark by number and states the Benchmark. Column Two – Text Alignment, Additional Resources/Activities Cites the School Education Group (McGraw-Hill) textbook chapters or pages that correlate to the Benchmark. Suggests instructional activities and materials to supplement the text and primary literature

Column Three – Supplemental Literature Lists additional literature to extend learning. Column Four – Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

Serves as a placeholder for teachers to add information that is specific to their school’s or students’ needs.

Of note: Benchmarks drive instructional decisions; the text is a resource Results of assessment are used to adjust and revise instruction

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 5

Quarterly Benchmarks

Quarter 1 Quarter 2

Quarterly Standards

SS.K.C.1.1 Define and give examples of rules and laws, and why they are important.

SS.K.C.1.2 Explain the purpose and necessity of rules and laws at home, school, and

community.*

SS.K.C.2.1 Demonstrate the characteristics of being a good citizen.*

SS.K.C.2.2 Demonstrate that conflicts among friends can be resolved in ways that are

consistent with being a good citizen.*

SS.K.C.2.3 Describe fair ways for groups to make decisions.

SS.K.A.3.1 Use words and phrases related to chronology and time to explain how

things change and to sequentially order events that have occurred in

school.

Common Core Standards

See page 7—Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5

Suggested Reading Selections

Jamaica Tag-Along

It’s Mine

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

* Indicates a Civics benchmark

Quarterly Standards

SS.K.A.1.1 Develop an understanding go how to use a timeline.

SS.K.A.1.2 Develop an awareness of a primary source.

SS.K.A.2.1 Compare children and families of today with those in the past.

SS.K.A.2.4 Listen to and retell stories about people in the past who have shown

character ideals and principles including honesty, courage, and responsibility.

SS.K.A.2.5 Recognize the importance of U.S. symbols.

Common Core Standards

See page 7—Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5

Suggested Reading Selections

The Long, Long Letter

Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

Thanksgiving on Plymouth Plantation

Thanksgiving Day

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 6

Quarter 3 Quarter 4

Quarterly Standards

SS.K.G.3.3 Describe and give examples of seasonal weather changes, and illustrate

how weather affects people and the environment.

SS.K.G.2.1 Locate and describe places in the school and community.

SS.K.G.2.2 Know one’s phone number, street address, city or town, and that Florida is

the state in which the student lives.

SS.K.G.1.1 Describe the relative location of people, places, and things by using

positional words.

SS.K.G.1.2 Explain that maps and globes help to locate different places and that

globes are a model of the Earth.

SS.K.G.1.3 Identify cardinal directions (north, south, east, west).

SS.K.G.1.4 Differentiate land and water features on simple maps and globes.

SS.K.G.3.1 Identify basic landforms.

SS.K.G.3.2 Identify basic bodies of water.

SS.K.A.2.4 Listen to and retell stories about people in the past who have shown

character ideals and principles including honesty, courage, and

responsibility.

Common Core Standards

See page 7—Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5

Suggested Reading Selections

The Busy Year

Me and the Map

Quarterly Standards

SS.K.E.1.1 Describe different kinds of jobs that people do and the tools or equipment

used.

SS.K.E.1.2 Recognize that U.S. currency comes in different forms.

SS.K.E.1.3 Recognize that people work to earn money to buy things they need or want.

SS.K.E.1.4 Identify the difference between basic needs and wants.

Common Core Standards

See page 7—Reading Standards for Informational Text K-5

Suggested Reading Selections

Bunny Money

Year-long Standards

SS.K.A.2.2 Recognize the importance of celebrations and national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring people, events , and our nation’s ethnic heritage.

SS.K.A.2.3 Compare our nation’s holidays with holidays of other cultures.

SS.K.A.3.2 Explain that calendars represent days of the week and months of the year.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Reading Standards for Informational Text K–5

Kindergarten Students

Key Ideas and Details

1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Craft and Structure

4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.

5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.

6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).

8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

Standard 10, “Range, Quality and Complexity of Text,” will be implemented through all grades K -12 with professional development offered across the school year to support this standard .

Grade-level Curriculum Guide

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Quarter 1

CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT

Standard: Civic and Political Participation

Essential Questions:

Why is it important to have classroom rules?

Why is it important to have rules in the community?

What would life be like if we did not have rules and laws?

Vocabulary: citizen, taking turns, rules, consequences, laws, agreement

Primary Literature: Jamaica Tag – Along by Juanita Havill

Jamaica is a young girl who wants to tag along with her brother to the basketball court. He shoos her away. She thinks he’s being unfair.

She goes to the sandbox and a younger child wants to play with her. She doesn’t want him to but remembers how she felt when her brother turned her away. She invites the younger boy to play with her. After a while, her brother comes and asks to play in the sandbox too.

Activities correlated to Jamaica Tag-Along:

Create a list of classroom rules and discuss why they are important.

Role play different situations in which classroom rules are needed.

Discuss school rules outside of the classroom. (hallway, lunchroom, playground etc.)

What are rules we have in the community?

Writing prompt: What is one classroom rule? Share why it is important to follow that rule.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT

Standard: Civic and Political Participation

Essential Questions:

Why is it important to have classroom rules?

Why is it important to have rules in the community?

What would life be like if we did not have rules and laws? Vocabulary: citizen, taking turns, rules, consequences, laws, agreement

Primary Literature: It’s Mine by Leo Lionni

A fable about three young frogs who are very selfish and will not share. A big toad teaches them that sharing is important, and they discover it can also be more fun.

Activities correlated to It’s Mine:

Invite volunteers to take part in a three-legged race. Encourage each team to think about what they might need to do to win.

Role play to come up with a set of rules for the frogs to help make things fair and to get along.

Create a list of classroom rules and discuss why they are important.

Role play different situations in which classroom rules are needed.

Discuss school rules outside of the classroom. (hallway, lunchroom, playground etc.)

What are rules we have in the community?

Writing prompt: What is one classroom rule? What would happen if you classmates didn’t follow that rule?

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.C.2.1 Demonstrate the characteristics of being a good citizen. SS.K.C.2.2 Demonstrate that conflicts among friends can be resolved in ways that are consistent with being a good citizen. SS.K.C.2.3 Describe fair ways for groups to make decisions.

UNIT 2 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

What is a good way to solve a conflict?

What happens if you do not follow a rule at home or in your community?

Why are laws important?

Why is a vote a fair way to make a decision? Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 2 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 2: Friends Examples: taking turns, sharing, taking responsibility, following rules, understanding the consequences of breaking rules, practicing honesty, self control, and participating in classroom decision making. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 2 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 2: Friends Examples: voting, taking turns, and coming to an agreement. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 2

Technology: discoveryeducation.com brainpopjr.com Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen by Howard Binkow David Goes to School by David Shannon Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats Mac.McG/Hill FL Treas. Reading series Big Book Unit 1 Molly and Simon Plus Hester by Lisa Jahn-Clough Mac.McG/Hill FL Treas. Reading series Trade Book Unit 2 Swimmy by Leo Lionni Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman Mac.McG/Hill FL Treas. Reading series Trade Book Unit 7 The Great Fuzz Frenzy by: Janet Stevens Duck for President by Doreen Cronin The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

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CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT

STANDARD: Foundations of Government, Law, and the American Political System

Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.C.1.1 Define and give examples of rules and laws, and why they are important SS.K.C.1.2 Explain the purpose and necessity of rules and laws at home, school, and community

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 2 Examples: Standing in line at school, and wearing a bike helmet. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 2 Examples: Attending school, and wearing a seat belt.

No David! by David Shannon Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathman Franklin’s Bicycle Helmet by Eva Moore

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

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AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Standard: Chronological Thinking

Essential Questions:

What are the names of the days and months?

Predict something that will happen at the end of the day; end of the year.

What time of day do you __________ , __________ , __________ (e.g., get ready for school)?

Can you explain what it means to have things occur in order?

Vocabulary: day, week, month, yesterday, today, tomorrow, past, present, future, last week, this week, before, after, morning, afternoon,

evening Primary Literature: The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle (Scholastic Publisher)

One Sunday a very hungry caterpillar hatches. He eats his way through a variety of foods that are boldly and colorfully illustrated. The story

progresses with the caterpillar spinning a cocoon and waking up as a butterfly, illustrating one of nature’s common but lovely marvels. Activities correlated to The Very Hungry Caterpillar:

Sequence the life cycle of the butterfly

Sequence days of the week

Sequence months of the year.

Compare and contrast activities between day and night. (Make a Venn Diagram)

If you were a hungry caterpillar, what would you eat first, next, and last?

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Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.A.2.2 Recognize the

importance of celebrations

and national holidays as a

way of remembering and

honoring people, events,

and our nation’s ethnic

heritage.

SS.K.A.2.3 Compare our

nation’s holidays with

holidays of other cultures.

SS.K.A.3.2 Explain that calendars represent days of the week and months of the year. Common Core Standards

RI.4 With prompting and

support, ask and answer

questions about unknown

words in a text.

Go Math Chapter 12: Time Everyday Counts Math Program Saxon Math

Cookie’s Week (Scholastic) Today Is Monday by Eric Carle Mouse and Mole and the Year Round Calendar by Doug Cushman

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

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Quarter 2

CIVICS AND GOVERNEMENT

Standard: Historical Inquiry and Analysis

Essential Question:

How has communication changed?

Vocabulary: timeline, photograph, letter, telephone

Primary Literature: The Long, Long Letter by Elizabeth Spurr (Troll Publisher)

Through rain and sleet and dark of night, a lonely Aunt Hetta stands vigil by her mailbox. Hetta’s sister is busy writing to Hetta, a letter which

fills several crates. Finally, a passing storm delivers the pages “air mail” to Aunt Hetta’s yard.

Activities correlated to The Long, Long, Letter:

Share the writing of a letter.

Retell events of story in sequence.

Make a T-Chart comparing life then and now.

Write and receive correspondence from Grandparents or other friends for relatives. Locate origin of letters or postcards on a map.

Writing prompt: How would you correspond with __________ (a family member) and why is that the best way for that person?

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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CIVICS AND GOVERNMENT

Standard: Historical Inquiry and Analysis

Essential Question:

How do people communicate with each other?

How has communication changed? Vocabulary: timeline, photograph, letter, telephone

Primary Literature: Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox

A heartwarming story about a young boy and his special relationships with the people who live in the nursing home next door.

Activities correlated to Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge:

Relate experiences students may have had with an elderly person.

Create a word web with “memory” as the focus. Record student memories of something that made them feel good.

Discuss the timeline of an elderly person’s life. We all start out as babies, grow until we are adults, and finally become a senior citizen.

Discuss how keepsakes are often saved to remind people of the past. Make a list of several items that could be saved to do this:

photographs, letters, etc.

Make a T-Chart comparing life when the students’ grandparents were young to life now. Talk about differences in transportation and

communication (phone, telegraph, mail service, etc.)

Ask students to bring in keepsakes special to them or their families (e.g., photographs, a letter or email from a grandparent, special

keepsakes).

Writing prompt: Select an item you consider to be a keepsake and explain why it is special to your family.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.A.3.1 Use words and phrases related to chronology and time to explain how things change and to sequentially order events that have occurred in school. SS.K.A.1.1 Develop an understanding of how to use and create a timeline. SS.K.A.1.2 Develop an awareness of a primary source

UNIT 1 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

Why do we go to school?

How do people change over time?

How do families change over time? Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 1 Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 1 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 2: Friends Put in order three things that happened in the school day. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 1 Show examples: Photographs, a letter from a grandparent, artifacts

Technology: discoveryeducation.com brainpopjr.com In the Yard (McGraw Hill) Franklin Goes to School by Paulette Bourgeois and Brenda Clark Peanut Butter and Jelly (Scholastic) Get Up and Go! By Stuart J. Murphy Duck on A Bike by David Shannon The Stray Dog by Marc Simont I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff Curious George Visits the Library by H.A. Rey Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport Bats at the Library by Brian Lie Community Helpers from A-Z by Bobbie D. Kalman Kangaroo, by Angela Royston In this book, photographs show a kangaroo’s life. There is a timeline at the bottom of each page.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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AMERICAN HISTORY

Standard: Historical Knowledge

Essential Question:

How was life different during the time of the Pilgrims?

Vocabulary: settlement, harvest, forefathers, passengers, colonists, feast

Primary Literature: Thanksgiving on Plymouth Plantation by Diane Stanley

Activities correlated to Thanksgiving on Plymouth Plantation:

Discuss settlement/colonists. How are our communities and citizens similar to settlements and colonists during the Pilgrim’s time?

Weave a placemat for your Thanksgiving feast.

Make a family tree and label the branches.

Relate to your family: Compare and contrast the foods the Pilgrims had for their feast to the foods you have at your Thanksgiving meal.

Relate to your classroom: What would our classroom be like if there was no electricity?

Writing prompt: What are you thankful for and why?

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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AMERICAN HISTORY

Standard: Historical Knowledge

Essential Question:

How was life different during the time of the Pilgrims?

Vocabulary: harvest, Pilgrims, Indians, crops, feast, thankful

Primary Literature: Thanksgiving Day by Gail Gibbons

The story of the Pilgrims – their journey to the new world, their way of life, ways the American Indians helped them, and the Thanksgiving

feast they shared. The story compares the past Thanksgiving feast with the way we celebrate the holiday today.

Activities correlated to Thanksgiving Day:

Write ‘thank you’ on the board. Ask the students about a time that they told someone thank you and why. List different ways to thank

someone on the board.

Create a 2-column chart and list differences between ‘Thanksgiving Long Ago’ and ‘Thanksgiving Today.’

Relate to your family: Compare and contrast the foods the Pilgrims had for their feast to the foods you have at your Thanksgiving meal.

Talk about Thanksgiving as being a national holiday. List other national holidays and discuss why we celebrate them.

Writing prompt: How do you share your thanks with your family?

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.A.2.1 Compare children and families of today with those in the past. SS.K.A.2.2 Recognize the importance of celebrations and national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring people, events, and our nation’s ethnic heritage. SS.K.A.2.3 Compare our nation’s holidays with holidays of other cultures. SS.K.A.2.4 Listen to and retell stories about people in the past who have shown character ideals and principles including honesty, courage, and responsibility. SS.K.A.2.5

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 1 Family life now versus family life when grandparents were young. UNIT 3 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

Why do we celebrate in America?

How do we celebrate in America?

Why does it take courage to help new people?

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 3 (Lessons 1, 2, 6 and 7) Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day [4

th of July], Cinco de Mayo, and birthdays.

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 3 (Lessons 1, 2, 6 and 7) Independence days are different in other countries. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 3 (Lessons 1, 2, 6 and 7) Examples: Pocahontas, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, and astronauts. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook

When I was Young in the Mountains by Cynthia Rylant Nana Upstairs and Nana Downstairs by Tomiede Paola Alicia’s Happy Day by Meg Starr September 12

th We Knew Everything

Would be All Right by first grade students of H . Byron Masterson Elem. Holiday! Celebration Days Around the World, by Dorling Kindersley Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King by Jean Marzollo Whoever You Are by Mem Fox Yoko by Rosemary Wells Mac.McG/Hill FL Treas. Reading series Trade Book Unit 4 Friends All Around by Miela Ford I am American by Charles R. Smith Jr. How My Parents Learned to Eat by Iva Friedman The Wall by Eve Bunting Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King by Jean Marzollo

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

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Recognize the importance of U.S. Symbols Common Core Standards

RI.4 With prompting and

support, ask and answer

questions about unknown

words in a text.

Unit 3 (Lessons 1, 2, 6 and 7) Examples: Statue of Liberty, the bald eagle, the Star Spangled Banner, and national and state flags.

Just Like Abraham Lincoln by Bernard Waber Abe Lincoln: The Boy Who Loved Books by Kay Winters The Pledge of Allegiance (Scholastic) God Bless America Irving Berlin O’Say Can You See? America’s Symbols, Landmarks, and Important Words by Sheila Keenan

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Quarter 3

GEOGRAPHY

Standard: Physical Systems

Essential Questions:

Identify bodies of water and basic landforms.

How does seasonal change affect people and the environment?

What are the bodies of water and basic landforms? What seasonal weather involves bodies of water?

Vocabulary: seasons, winter, spring, summer, fall, weather

Primary Literature: The Busy Year by Leo Lionni

Winnie and Willie are two mice that meet a tree named Woody. The mice become friends with the tree and together they experience the

different seasons of the year.

Activities correlated to The Busy Year:

Compare and contrast the different seasons.

Make a list of words that relate to each season.

Discuss daily weather.

Make a collage of different seasons by cutting pictures out of magazines.

Writing prompt: What is your favorite season and what do you like to do in that season? Or, what is your favorite season and why?

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.G.3.3 Describe and give examples of seasonal weather changes and illustrate how weather affects people and the environment.

UNIT 4 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

How do we find places?

How does where we live affect the things we do?

How does the weather affect the things we do?

How do the seasons affect the things around us?

How do the seasons affect the things we do? Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 7: Weather Examples: Rivers, lakes, oceans, and gulfs.

Technology: discoveryeducation.com brainpopjr.com What Makes the Seasons? by Megan Montague Cash Caps, Hats, Socks, and Mittens by Louise Borden My Favorite Time of Year by Susan Pearson

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GEOGRAPHY

Standard: Places and Regions

Essential Questions:

How are maps helpful?

What can maps show us?

Vocabulary: map, town, state, United States, country, world

Primary Literature: Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney

A young girl makes a map of her own bedroom, her house, her town, her state and the United States. She uses the maps to find places that

are special to her. (This is a great book for teaching directions north, south, east, and west.)

Activities correlated to Me on the Map

Discuss which city, state, and country we live in.

Show how a globe is a model of the earth.

Discuss north, south, east, and west.

Create a map of the classroom.

Writing prompt: Describe a time your family used a map and how it was helpful. Or, think of a way your family could use a map and

describe why it would be helpful.

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Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.G.2.1 Locate and describe places in the school and community. SS.K.G.2.2 Know one’s own phone number, street address, city or town, and that Florida is the state in which the student lives.

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 6: Neighborhood Examples: cafeteria, library, office, restrooms, and classrooms. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4

One Afternoon by Yumi Heo Tiptoe Into Kindergarten by Jacqueline Rogers Where do I Live? by Neil Chesanow Alexander, Who’s Not (Do you hear me? I mean it!) Going to Move by Judith Viorst My Town by Rebecca Treays

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GEOGRAPHY

STANDARD: The World in Spatial Terms

Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.G.1.1 Describe the relative location of peoples, places, and things by using positional words. SS.K.G.1.2 Explain that maps and globes help to locate different places and that globes are a model of the Earth. SS.K.G.1.3 Identify cardinal directions (north, south, east, west). SS.K.G.1.4 Differentiate land and water features on simple maps and globes.

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Examples: near/far, above/below, left/right, behind/front. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Examples: The color blue represents water, and green/brown represents land.

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins Can You Read a Map? by Rozanne Williams And My Place in Space by Joan Sweeney My Town by Sindy McKay There’s a Map on My Lap! By Tish Rabe God Bless America by Irving Berlin

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 26

Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.G.3.1 Identify basic landforms. SS.K.G.3.2 Identify basic bodies of water. SS.K.A.2.4 Listen to retell stories about people in the past who have shown character, ideals, and principles including SS.K.A.2.2 Recognize the importance of celebrations and national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring people, events, and our nation’s ethnic heritage. SS.K.A.2.3 Compare our nation’s holidays with holidays of other cultures. Common Core

Standards

RI.4 With prompting and

support, ask and answer

questions about unknown

words in a text.

Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 Examples: Hills, forests, wetlands, and coast. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 4 UNIT 3 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

What does it mean to have freedom?

Why is being President a big responsibility? Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 3 (Lessons 3, 4, and 5)

A Mountain Alphabet by Andrew Kiss Swimmy by Leo Lionni Water by Frank Asch

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 27

Quarter 4

ECONOMICS

Standard: Beginning Economics

Essential Questions:

What is the difference between a need and a want?

Why is it important to have a job? Vocabulary: money, needs, wants, choices

Primary Literature: Bunny Money by Rosemary Wells

Max and Ruby Rabbit went shopping to buy Grandma a birthday gift. Ruby knew exactly what she wanted to buy but Max kept spending the

money on other things. There is play money at the front and back of the book that can be photocopied and used to reinforce counting and

money value.

Activities correlated to Bunny Money

Discuss the difference between needs and wants.

Sort picture cards of needs and wants.

Show the different ways people make money.

Show the different forms of currency.

Create a priority chart of needs and wants for the classroom. Allow students to cut out pictures from classroom catalogs.

Writing prompt: If you had $5.00 to buy a gift for someone, what would you buy and why?

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 28

Benchmark Text Alignment Additional Resources/Activities

Supplemental Literature/Technology Open: Specific to teacher, grade, subject, school

SS.K.E.1.1 Describe different kinds of jobs that people do and the tools for equipment used. SS.K.E.1.2 Recognize that the United States currency comes in different forms. SS.K.E.1.3 Recognize that people work to earn money to buy things they want or need. SS.K.E.1.4 Identify the difference between basic needs and wants. SS.K.A.2.2 Recognize the importance of celebrations and national holidays as a way of remembering and honoring people,

UNIT 5 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

Why do people work? Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 5 Additional: Macmillan McGraw/Hill FL Treasures Reading series Unit 6: Neighborhood Examples: Community helpers, (firefighters and firetruck) Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 5 Examples: coins and bills. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 5 Examples of needs are clothing and shelter and examples of wants are video games and toys. Living, Learning, and Working Together Textbook Unit 5

Technology: discoveryeducation.com brainpopjr.com Clifford The Fire House Dog by Norman Bridwell A Day with Police Officers by Jan Kottlee Froggy Goes to the Doctor by Jonathon London The Night Worker by Kate Banks Pig Pig Gets a Job by David McPhail Alexander Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst A Chair For My Mother by Vera B. Williams A Quarter From the Tooth Fairy by Caren Holtzman The Berenstain Bears: Trouble with Money by Berenstain All About Monday by Erin Roberson Pennies, Nickels, and Quarters, all by Mary Hill Lemonade for Sale by Stuart J. Murphy The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein The Greedy Python by Eric Carle

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 29

events, and our nation’s ethnic heritage. SS.K.A.2.3 Compare our nation’s holidays with holidays of other cultures. Common Core

Standards

RI.4 With prompting and

support, ask and answer

questions about unknown

words in a text.

The Berenstain Bears: Get the Gimmies by Berenstain

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

REV 062012 Kindergarten Social Studies Page 30

Reading Rainbow Selections Elementary Social Studies

Always My Dad

Animal Café

Bread is for Eating

Fly Away Home

Follow the Drinking Gourd

Fox on the Job

Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message

Hail to Mail

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World

June 29, 1999

Kate Shelley and the Midnight Express

Keep the Lights Burning, Abbie

Knots on a Counting Rope

The Lotus Seed

Meanwhile Back at the Ranch

Mrs. Katz and Tush

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters

My America: A Poetry Atlas of the United States

My Little Island

Ox-Cart Man

The Paper Crane

The Patchwork Quilt

Ruth Law Thrills a Nation

Silent Lotus

Someplace Else

Sunken Treasure

Tar Beach

Uncle Jed’s Barbershop

The Wall

Watch the Stars Come Out

The Wonderful Towers of Watts

Worksong

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 31

Topic Requirements by Statute

1. Declaration of Independence, Grades 2, 5

2. Federalist Papers, Grade 5

3. U.S. Constitution, Grades 2, 3, 5

4. Flag education, Grades K-2

5. Elements of federalism/fed/state/local, Grades 2, 3, 5

6. Holocaust, Grade 5

7. African American contributions, Grades K-5

8. Agriculture, Grades K, 2, 4

9. Alcohol/narcotics and effects on the body, Grades 1, 2, 4, 5

10. Kindness to animals, Grades K, 1, 2

11. Florida state history, Grade 4

12. Conservation of natural resources, Grades K-5

13. Health education, Grades K-5

14. Contributions of women, Grades K-5

15. Contributions of Hispanics, Grades K-5

16. Patriotism and sacrifices of veterans, Grades K-5

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 32

Social Studies K-5 Websites and Resources

www.pitt.edu/~poole/eledsocialstudies.html

www.internet4classrooms.com/social.htm

www.homeworkspot.com/elementary/socialstudies

www.ncpublicschools.org/curriculum/socialstudies/elementary

http://childparenting.about.com/od/elementarysocialstudies/Elementary_Social_Studies.htm

www.apples4theteacher.com/socialstud.html

http://www.findingdulcinea.com/guides/Education?Elementary-School-social-studies.html

www.pbs.org/teachers

www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/plans.html

www.socialstudies.org/resources

www.ket.org/education/links.htm

www.socialstudiesforkids.com

http://www.doe.virginia.gov/VDOE/Instruction/History/curriculum_framework_2008/index.html

www.theteacherscorner.net/lesson-plans/socialstudies/index.htm

http://www.trumanlibrary.org/educ/sites.htm

http://www.sldirectory.com/teachf/socsci.html

Teaching Social studies: A Literacy-Based Approach by Emily Schell and Douglas Fisher

www.studiesweekly.com

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 33

Additional Resources That Encompass All Units

Social Studies Weekly

Character Education Studies Weekly

www.schoolwideonline.com

http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu

www.edel.edu/dssep/econlit/econreadk.html

www.brainpopjr.com

Social Studies, Grades 1-2, Best Buy Bargain Books, published by Frank Schaffer 1994

Social Studies, Inventive Exercises to Sharpen Skills and Raise Achievement, Grades K-1, The Basic Not Boring Series, by Inventive

Publications, Inc., 1998

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 34

Additional Literature by Theme Primary Civics (K-2)

Theme Addressed: Government

Title Author Subject Brief Description

Feathers and Fools* Mem Fox Government/Arms Race

Parable

Peacocks and sw ans do not communicate w ith each other; they are fearful and distrustful and as a result each side

builds up an "arsenal" and destroys each other. A baby peacock and sw an decide to become friends and focus on

their similarities rather than differences.

If I Were Queen of the

World

Fred Hiatt Authority/Limits To Pow er Queen is very pow erful and self -indulgent; only the love of her little brother can reign in some of her unchecked and

abusive pow er.

Kindergarten Show -Off Ann Martin Conflict Tw o friends are alw ays competing w ith each other; teacher devises a w ay for girls to sort through their conflict by

utilizing strategies and rules.

Too Many Tamales** Gary Soto Family "Government" Child fears she has lost her mother's diamond ring; children eat tamales to f ind ring but mother has it all along.

We the People: The

Constitution of the United

States of America

Peter Spier Preamble of Constitution Author provides overview of Constitutional Convention and ratif ication, then uses illustrations to make each phrase in

the preamble come alive for children.

Theme Addressed: Values and Principles

Title Author Subject Brief Description

A Children's Chorus* Dutton (Publisher) Values Illustrates the principles on w hich the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of the Child w ere based.

For Every Child* text adapted by

Caroline Castle

The UN Convention on the

Rights of the Child

This book explains fourteen of the more prominent rights of the child under the UN Convention on the Rights of the

Child. Each article is accompanied by a tw o page illustrated spread. There is a compassionate forw ard by the

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and the full text of the Convention featured at the back of the book. The book is illustrated by fourteen acclaimed artists.

Hanna's Cold Winter Trish Marx Self lessness in the face of personal adversity

Hanna is a hippo at the zoo in Hungary. During WWII, the tow n became occupied by Germans and the people and zoo creatures began to starve. How ever, the entire tow n began taking their straw mats and shoes to the starving

hippos in order to keep them alive during the cold w inter and German occupation.

Happy Birthday, Martin

Luther King*

Jean Marzollo Values and principles MLK

fought for

Offers accessible biography of Dr. King's life and accomplishments. Outlines the values he stood for and concludes

w ith his assassination.

I Have A Dream** Martin Luther King,

Jr. and Coretta Scott

King

Values and principles

enunciated in the "I Have a

Dream" speech

15 aw ard-winning artists illustrate MLK's speech. Artists also give their impressions about MLK's speech.

Juneteenth Jamboree Carole Boston

Weatherford

Holidays that celebrate

values and history

Chronicles the Juneteenth celebration, w hich recognizes the day on w hich slaves in Texas learned they w ere free—

more than tw o years after the Emancipation Proclamation.

People* Peter Spier Diversity Celebrates diversity as an American value and transmits message that life w ould be very dull if everyone w ere the same.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 35

History and Children's Literature Primary Reading

Title Author Subject Summary

An Ellis Island Christmas Maxinne Rhea

Leighton

Immigration Krysia and her family leave Poland to meet her father in America. She experiences a variety of emotions on their

voyage across the ocean, and makes friends w ith other passengers on the ship.

Cornstalks and

Cannonballs*

Barbara Mitchell War w ith England, 1812 The legendary story of w hen the citizens of Lew es, Delaw are pulled together and scared aw ay a British ship that w as

blocking their harbor.

Escaping to America: A

True Story*

Rosalyn Schanzer Immigration This book is based on the true story of the authors relatives w ho fled Poland after WWI due to anti-Semitic violence.

The family's relatives had already established themselves in America and w ould vouch for them. How ever, they still

had to escape from the w ar zone in Poland and survive the voyage to the U.S.

Faithful Elephants Translated by

Tomoko Tsuchiya Dykes

World War II This is a true story about zoo animals in Tokyo that had to be killed during the bombing of the city during WWII for

fear they w ould run through the tow n if the zoo w as bombed directly. The main focus of the story in on three trained elephants.

Freedom School, Yes!* Amy Littlesugar Civil Rights during the Summer of 1964

This story is based on the 1964 Mississippi Freedom School Summer Project. Despite the church w here the Freedom school w as to be taught being burnt dow n and other hardships, the freedom school is established, and

Jolie, he main character learns about her Black-American heritage. Illustrated by Floyd Cooper.

Freedom Summer* Deborah Wiles Cilvil Rights during the

Summer of 1964

This book takes place during the Summer w hen the Civil Rights act of 1964 w as passed. Segregation, southern w hite

retaliation to the law , and the w illingness to stand up for w hat you believe are exposed through the friendship of tw o

young boys, one w hite and one black.

Grandfather's Journey** Allen Say Immigration After traveling around the U.S., the author's grandfather returns to Japan and his family. He tells his grandson Allen

tales of California, and eventually the young man moves there. He f inds he loves both places, and he misses them

w henever he is aw ay.

In America Marissa Moss Immigration Walter's grandpa explains w hy he chose to come to America w hen other members of his family stayed in Lithuania.

Walter w onders if he w ould have done the same if he had been in his grandpa's shoes.

Katie's Trunk Ann Turner The American Revolution Katie's parents are know n as loyalists on the eve of the American Revolution. When the Patriots come to their house

in search of supplies, Katie hides in a trunk. Although one man finds her, he keeps her secret and leaves her in peace. His actions teach Katie that good people can have different beliefs.

Sw eet Clara and the Freedom Quilt

Deborah Hopkinson The Underground Railroad Clara is a young slave girl living on a plantation. She devises a secret code for the underground railroad that is quilted onto blankets.

The Bracelet** Yoshiko Uchida Japanese internment camps. Emi's friend gives her a bracelet the day before she is sent to an internment camp. She loses the bracelet, but w ith

her mother's help she realizes she can remember her loved ones w ithout tangible objects.

The Lily Cupboard Shulamith Levey

Oppenheim

World War II in Europe During WWII, a young Jew ish girl named Miriam is sent to stay w ith a farm family. When soldiers come to search the

farm, she is forced to hide in a secret cupboard to remain safe.

Thunder at Gettysburg Patricia Gauch Battle of Gettysburg Tilly w atches the Battle of Gettysburg from her attic w indow as though it w ere a circus. How ever, soon she f inds

herself draw n into the terrible and seemingly unending fray.

When Jessie Came Across

the Sea*

Amy Hest Immigration Thirteen year old Jessie travels from a tiny village in Eastern Europe to NYC and, w ith patience and determination,

f inds success and happiness in her new country. Earns suff icient money to bring her beloved grandmother to America. Exquisite illustrations by P.J. Lynch.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 36

Geography and Children's Literature Primary Reading

Title Author Theme Summary

All Kinds of Children Norma Simon Place, Relationships Beautifully illustrated w atercolors accompany the narrative w hich describes things children all over the w orld have

in common; food, clothing, love, play, physical attributes, and the likes.

Is Anybody Up? Ellen Kandoian Location Early one Saturday morning a little girl named Mollie w oke up to a quiet house. While her family still slept, other people and animals w ho lived in the same time zone aw oke and greeted those around them.

Mapping Penny's World Loreen Leedy Location: Map-making and map reading

In simplistic and colorful w ays, this book show s children how to create maps of their familiar surroundings.

Mojave Diane Siebert Place, Relationships, Region This epic poem is great for reading out loud. The author uses the text and illustrations to describe the beauty of the

Mojave desert and the story of its people's history.

My America: A Poetry

Atlas of the United

States*

Selected by Lee

Bennett Hopkins

Place, Region, Relationships This is a compilation of Poems, organized by region, about the geography of all the states in the Union. Poets

featured in the atlas include; Langston Hughes, Carl Sandburg, Nikki Giovanni, and Lilian Moore. Illustrations by

Stephen Alcorn.

My Cousin Katie Michael Garland Place, Relationships A young child, excited at the prospect of visiting Cousin Katie, describes her farm in rich detail.

People* Peter Spier Place, Relationships This book explains and illustrates the differences and similarities of people all over the w orld.

Tar Beach Faith Ringgold Place, Movement As Cassie lies on the roof of her apartment building, w hich is know n as Tar Beach, she imagines herself f lying over

famous New York City landmarks. In her daydream the beautiful sites belong to her, a rew ard for the injustices her

family has suffered.

The Empty Lot Dale H. Fife Place, Relationships The book's main character, Harry Hale w ants to sell a small piece of land that had once been a part of his

grandfather's farm. How ever, w hen he visits the lot he discovers that the overgrow n land is home to many animals, and he has a change of heart.

The Life and Times of the Apple*

Charles Micucci

Place, Relationships, Region, Location

This book provides information about apples, w hile teaching students to think geographically.

Time To Go David and Beverly

Fiday

Place, Relationships, Movement,

Region

Although this book does not contain a lot of text, there are many good vocabulary w ords. The story illustrates a

young boy's f inal trek around his family's farm on the day they move to a new home.

Window * Jeannie Baker Location, Relationships This book tells a story through beautiful collage constructions of how rural areas become urbanized.

Economics and Children's Literature

Title Author Theme(s) Summary

A Birthday for Frances Russell Hoban Barter This story discusses w hy people trade or barter for things.

A Country Far Aw ay* Nigel Gray & Philippe

Dupasquier

Consumers Tw o boys consume different things; one boy lives in a village in Africa, w hile the other boy lives in a Western nation.

A Kid's Guide to Managing

Money

Joy Wilt Managing money This book teaches children how to manage money once they have earned it.

A New Coat for Anna* Harriet Ziesert Barter During WWII, a w oman trades her valuables for materials she needs to make a coat for her daughter.

Alexander Who Used to be

Rich Last Sunday*

Judith Viorst Opportunity cost Alexander is forced to deal w ith the consequences of his actions.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 37

Bananas from Manolo to Margie

George Ancona Workers/producers, consumers, specialization

The production of bananas in Honduras requires many specialized w orkers. This book looks at the producers and consumers of bananas.

Bunny Money* MaryAnn Wells Saving, spending, decision-making

Fire Fighters Ray Broekel Workers/producers, services,

specialization

Men and w omen must go through specialized training programs to become fire f ighters because people depend on

them in emergencies.

From Seed to Salad Hannah Lyons

Johnson

Interdependence Children w ork together to plant, cultivate, and harvest a garden.

"Helping" and "Bang-Klang"

in Where the Sidew alk

Ends**

Shel Silverstein Interdependence,

w orkers/producers

These tw o poems explore different situations in w hich people must help/rely on others.

How to Make an Apple Pie

and See the World**

Marjorie Priceman Interdependence

Hunches in Bunches Dr. Seuss Choices A young boy is faced by several different options and struggles to make a decision about how to spend his time.

If You Give a Mouse a

Cookie*

Laura Joffe Numeroff Wants The little mouse in this story has many w ants that soon lead him to desire other things.

In a People House Theo LeSieg Goods Uninvited guests, a bird and a mouse, take a tour of a family's house and discover an array of goods.

In My Tow n Richard Scarry Interdependence The author explains w hy goods, services, and specialization of w orkers are all needed to make a tow n run smoothly.

Little Pig's Tale Nijel Gray Choices The main character must decide on w hat to buy his mother for her birthday.

"Magic Carpet" in A Light in

the Attic**

Shel Silverstein Choices This poem examines the many possible uses of a f lying carpet.

Making Up Your Ow n Mind Joy Wilt Decisions and

tradeoffs

This book teaches children how to make decisions involving money and borrow ing.

"Ourchestra," "Pancakes?,"

"Hector the Collector," "Point of View ," "Poor

Angus," & "Afraid of the

Dark" in Where the

Sidew alk Ends**

Shel Silverstein Productive re-use, realistic

vs. unrealistic needs, different people have different w ants

and opinions

The author uses different poems to teach children lessons about w ants and needs.

People Who Help People Jane Belk Moncure Interdependence Family members and community w ork together to help one another on a daily basis.

People Working Douglas Florian Workers/producers This books contains numerous illustrations of people w orking on land, sea, and air, at all times of the day.

Pigs Will Be Pigs* Amy Axelrod Money A family of pigs needs to eat, but they do not have enough money. The pigs look for money, f igure out w hat it w ill buy,

and go to a restaurant.

"Play Ball" in A Light in the

Attic**

Shel Silverstein Interdependence This poem explains that children must w ork together to play baseball.

Richard Scarry's Busiest

People Ever and Richard Scarry's What Do People

Do All Day

Richard Scarry Workers/ producers Both of these books examine a w ide variety of people and the w ork they do.

Richard Scarry's What Do Richard Scarry Specialization and This book looks at a w ide variety of occupations.

OKALOOSA COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

KG Social Studies / REV 062012 Page 38

People Do All Day interdependence

Round and Round the

Money Goes

Melvin and Gilda

Berger

Money This book explains the development of money from its origins to modern usage as cash, checks, and credit cards.

Saturday Sancocho* Leyla Torres Barter

Talking w ith Artists** Pat Cummings, ed. Workers/producers A group of illustrators discuss how and w hy they became artists for children's books and include examples of their

w ork from both their childhood and adult experiences.

The Berenstain Bears Get the Gimmes

Stan & Jan Berenstain

Wants Brother and Sister Bear learn they cannot have everything they w ant.

The Goat in the Rug** Charles L. Blood & Martin Link

Workers/producers, natural, human, and capital resources

This book about a Navajo w eaver and her goat provides a step-by-step description of rug making and allow s students an opportunity to distinguish betw een the different types of resources.

The Hundred Penny Box** Sharon Bell Mathis Value of money Michael's relative uses her collection of pennies to teach him about life during the Depression.

The Mitten* Jan Britt Scarcity In this story several w oodland creatures try to make a mitten into their new home. How ever, as more and more animals discover the cozy hideaw ay space becomes very limited.

The Money Tree Sarah Stew art Value of money A w oman grow s a money tree in her yard and must deal w ith the people w ho w ant to pick the money tree's leaves.

The "Painter" in A Light in the Attic**

Shel Silverstein Workers/producers This poem describes the w ork of a painter.

The Popcorn Book* Tomie dePaola Workers/producers,

resources

This book discusses the history of producing and preparing popcorn; the author also includes several recipes.

The Story of Money Ed Steinberg Value of money This comic book discusses and illustrates forms of money, its origins and value, and explains w hy money plays an

important role in societies throughout the w orld.

Tony's Bread Tomie dePaola Workers/producers An Italian baker named Tony makes a loaf of bread.

Tops and Bottoms Janet Stevens Entrepreneurship, venture

capitalism, investment,

competition

This book is a sequel to Aesop's

"Hare and the Tortoise". The economic lessons in the story are based upon Hare being dow n on his luck and f inding

a w ay to support his family.

Understanding Money Carol and James

Barkin

Spending, saving, value of

money

The author compares the purchasing pow er of money throughout the w orld and looks at how savings accounts w ork.

"Us" in Where the Sidew alk

Ends

Shel Silverstein Choices In this poem a person has a diff icult time making a choice.

What Will I be? A Wish Book

Kathleen Krull Cow les Workers/producers The children in this story imagine w hat their future jobs w ill be like.

Where Does This Come From? Bubble Gum

H.I. Peeples Workers/producers, resources

This book looks at the origin of bubble gum and discusses the means of production.