Sintesis de Periodo Segundo III Periodo

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    ENGLISH

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    My family:

    MY FAMILY

    The members of family are: Grandfather (or granddad), grandmother (orgrandma), father, mother, brother, sister (son and girl - children), aunt, uncle,cousin, nephew (man), niece (woman), grandson (granddaughter), brother andsister-in-law and so on.

    Days of the Week

    The history of the days of the week is closely intertwined with the advancement ofmankind through the centuries. The Week came to have seven days mainly

    because it was a relatively easy way to break up the month into four manageablesegments. There was also the fact that the Hebrews believed that God created theEarth and heavens in seven days. This notion of a holy sanction for the seven dayweek was passed on to other peoples and religions, including Christians andMoslems.

    Sunday is the Lord's day for Christians, yet it is named for the sun. Like many otherdays of the week it was actually named by the Norsemen who invaded England in

    http://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/theweek.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/sunday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/sunday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/theweek.shtml
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    the centuries preceding the Norman Conquest. It is a Norse change of the Romandesignation of the day.

    If the sun has its own day why not the moon on Monday? Astronomic bodiesplayed a prominent place in the beliefs of early peoples. The moon and its

    phaseswas especially fascinating.

    Tuesday is not named for the number. It is named for the Norse god of War.WasWednesday named for weddings? Not even close. (Close only countsinhorseshoes and hand grenades.) Another in the line of days named for Norsegods. This one was for Woden (or Odin), the chief of the pantheon.

    When you hear thunder on Thursday you will remember how this day got its name.It was named for the Scandanavian god of thunder, Thor. Friday is the only day ofthe week named for a woman. Her name was Frigga and she was the consort ofOdin. IfFriday falls on the 13th, it is considered by some to be unlucky.

    The last day of the week is Saturday. It is the only day of the week in the Englishlanguage that retained its Roman character. It takes its name from the Roman godof time and the harvest.

    Click on the links in the navbar above to find the history of a particular day, or readthrough the entire site by clicking on the "next page" links at the bottom of eachpage.

    http://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/monday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/astronomy/moon-waxes-wanes.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/astronomy/moon-waxes-wanes.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/tuesday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/wednesday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/horseshoes/and-handgrenades.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/thursday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/friday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/friday-13th.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/saturday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/monday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/astronomy/moon-waxes-wanes.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/astronomy/moon-waxes-wanes.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/tuesday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/wednesday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/horseshoes/and-handgrenades.htmhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/thursday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/friday.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/friday-13th.shtmlhttp://www.indepthinfo.com/weekdays/saturday.shtml
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    A CALENDAR

    There are 12 months in a year. The first month of the year is January. The lastmonth of the year is December. Some months have 30 days and some have 31.January, March, May, July, August, October and December have 31 days. April,June September and November have 30 days. February has 28 days andsometimes 29.

    We use the months of the year to write the important dates about us, for exampleour birthday, our familiar dates and special dates of our country as theindependence Day and more of them.

    The months of the year are:

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    Vegetative reproduction is asexual

    reproductionother terms that applyare vegetative propagation or

    vegetative multiplication.

    Vegetative growth is enlargement of

    the individual plant; vegetative

    reproduction is any process that results in new plant "individuals" without production of

    seeds or spores.

    Plants reproduction

    Non-flowering plants

    Some plants don't produce flowers and seeds. Plants such as ferns and mosses are called

    nonflowering plants and produce spores instead of seeds. There is also another group

    called the Fungi, that include mushrooms, and these also reproduce by spores. We often

    think of these individuals as "non photosynthetic plants" when in fact they belong to their

    very own group or kingdom.

    Spores are microscopic specks of living material. Ferns produce their spores on the

    undersides of the leaves (fronds). You may have seen them. They are the brown "spots"

    or "pads" on the bottom of the leaves. If you have access to a microscope, use it to look at

    the spores. You will find them to be a variety of shapes and unique to each kind of fern.

    Plants from parts is a form of asexual orvegetative propagation. This process is sometimes

    called cloning because every new plant is exactly like the parent. One type of cloning uses

    cuttings--parts of plants that grow into new plants. Both stems and leaves can be used as

    cuttings. Another kind of cloning is grafting--the joining together of two plants into one.

    Other kinds of cloning use bulbs ortubers--underground parts that make new plants.

    http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/spore.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/vegetative.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/vegetative.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/cloning.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/cutting.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/grafting.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/bulb.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/tuber.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/spore.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/vegetative.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/cloning.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/cutting.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/grafting.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/bulb.htmlhttp://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/gpe/glossary/tuber.html
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    Flowering plants

    Pollination is very important. It leads to the creation of new seeds that grow into

    new plants.

    But how does pollination work? Well, it all begins in the flower. Flowering plants have

    several different parts that are important in pollination. Flowers have male parts called

    stamens that produce a sticky powder called pollen. Flowers also have a female part

    called the pistil.

    The top of the pistil is called the stigma, and is often sticky. Seeds are made at the baseof the pistil, in the ovule.

    To be pollinated, pollen must be moved from a stamen to the stigma. When pollen from a

    plant's stamen is transferred to that same plant's stigma, it is called self-pollination.

    When pollen from a plant's stamen is transferred to a different plant's stigma, it is called

    cross-pollination. Cross-pollination produces stronger plants. The plants must be of the

    same species. For example, only pollen from a daisy can pollinate another daisy. Pollen

    from a rose or an apple tree would not work.

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    Canada is a country occupying most of northern North America, extending from the

    Atlantic Ocean in the east to the Pacific Ocean in the west and northward into the Arctic

    Ocean. It is the world's second largest country by total area, and shares land borders with

    the United States to the south and northwest.

    The land occupied by Canada was inhabited for millennia by various aboriginal peoples.

    Beginning in the late 15th century, British and French expeditions explored and later

    settled the Atlantic coast. France ceded nearly all ofits colonies in North America in 1763after the Seven Years War. In 1867, with the union of three British North American

    colonies through Confederation, Canada was formed as a federal dominion of four

    provinces. This began an accretion of additional provinces and territories and a process of

    increasing autonomy from the United Kingdom, highlighted by the Statute of Westminster

    in 1931 and culminating in the Canada Act in 1982 which severed the vestiges of legal

    dependence on the British parliament.

    A federation now comprising ten provinces and three territories, Canada is a parliamentary

    democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. It is

    a bilingual and multicultural country, with both English and French as official languages at

    the federal level. Technologically advanced and industrialized, Canada maintains a

    diversified economy that is heavily reliant upon its abundant natural resources and upon

    tradeparticularly with the United States, with which Canada has a long and complex

    relationship.

    Borders

    North: Antarctic Ocean

    South: USA

    West: Pacific Ocean

    East: Atlantic Ocean

    Provinces and territories of Canada

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Americahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_outlying_territories_by_total_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_borderhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Stateshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_peoples_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_colonization_of_the_Americashttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_colonization_of_the_Americashttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Francehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Years_Warhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_North_Americahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Confederationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federalismhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statute_of_Westminster_1931http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statute_of_Westminster_1931http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Act_1982http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_and_territories_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_systemhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_systemhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitutional_monarchyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_II_of_the_United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilingualism_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiculturalismhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Englishhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Frenchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developed_countryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_relationshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_relationshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Americahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_Oceanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_and_outlying_territories_by_total_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_borderhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Stateshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_peoples_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_colonization_of_the_Americashttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_colonization_of_the_Americashttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Francehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Years_Warhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_North_Americahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Confederationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federalismhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statute_of_Westminster_1931http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statute_of_Westminster_1931http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Act_1982http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_and_territories_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_systemhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_systemhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitutional_monarchyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_II_of_the_United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilingualism_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiculturalismhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Englishhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Frenchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developed_countryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_relationshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada%E2%80%93United_States_relations
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    Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up

    the world's second largest country in total area. The major difference between a Canadian

    province and a territory is that a province receives relatively greater power and authority

    directly from the Crown, via the Constitution Act, 1867, whereas territories derive their

    mandates from the federal government.

    The current provinces areAlberta,British Columbia,Manitoba, New Brunswick,

    Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia,Ontario,Prince Edward Island,Quebec, and

    Saskatchewan. The three territories are Northwest Territories, Nunavut, andYukon.

    The Symbols of Canada

    The symbols of Canada can heighten not only our awareness of our country but also our

    sense of celebration in being Canadian. The symbols of Canada are a celebration of what

    we are as a people.

    The Arms of Canada

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_Act%2C_1867http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albertahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albertahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitobahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitobahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newfoundland_and_Labradorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Islandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Islandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebechttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebechttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatchewanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Territorieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunavuthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukonhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukonhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/arm1_e.cfmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_in_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_Act%2C_1867http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albertahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitobahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newfoundland_and_Labradorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Islandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebechttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatchewanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Territorieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunavuthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukonhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/arm1_e.cfm
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    The National Flag

    The Royal Union Flag

    The beaver

    http://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/df1_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/union_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o1_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/df1_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/union_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o1_e.cfm
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    The maple (tree - leaf)

    Tartans

    http://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o2_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o3_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o6_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o2_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o3_e.cfmhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o6_e.cfm
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    1. Maple leaf *2. Newfoundland and Labrador3. Prince Edward Island4. Nova Scotia5. New Brunswick

    6. Quebec *7. Ontario8. Manitoba9. Saskatchewan10. Alberta11. British Columbia12. Northwest Territories13. Yukon

    * not official tartans

    The Great Seal

    ELIZABETH II

    Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, is the sovereign and head of state of Canada, and

    gives repository ofexecutive power,judicial and legislative power; as expressed in

    the constitution: "the Executive Government and Authority of and over Canada is

    and be vested in the Queen." However, sovereignty in Canada has never rested

    solely with the monarch due to the English Bill of Rights of 1689, later inherited by

    Canada, which established the principle ofParliamentary sovereignty in the United

    Kingdom. Nonetheless, the monarch is still known as the sovereign of Canada.

    http://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o8_e.cfmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_II_of_the_United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereigntyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_of_statehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_powerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judiciaryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legislaturehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_of_Rights_1689http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_sovereigntyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdomhttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/cpsc-ccsp/sc-cs/o8_e.cfmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_II_of_the_United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereigntyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_of_statehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_powerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judiciaryhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legislaturehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_of_Rights_1689http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_sovereigntyhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdomhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom
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    In Canada's federal system, the headship of state is not a part of either the federal

    or provincial jurisdictions; the Queen reigns impartially over the country as a whole;

    meaning the sovereignty of each jurisdiction is passed on not by the Governor

    General or the Canadian parliament, but through the Crown itself. Thus, the Crown

    is "divided" into eleven legal jurisdictions, eleven "crowns" one federal and ten

    provincial. The Fathers of Confederation viewed this system of constitutional

    monarchy as a bulwark against any potential fracturing of the Canadian federation

    Ottawa is the capital ofCanada and the country's fourth largest municipality, as

    well as the second largest city in the province ofOntario. It is located in the Ottawa

    Valley in the eastern portion ofprovince of Ontario. Ottawa lies on the banks of the

    Ottawa River, a major waterway that forms the boundary between Ontario and

    Quebec.

    There is no federal capital district in Canada. Ottawa is a municipality within the

    Province of Ontario. Although it does not constitute a separate administrative

    district, Ottawa is part of the federally-designated National Capital Region, which

    includes the neighbouring Quebec municipality ofGatineau. As with other national

    capitals, the word "Ottawa" is also used to refer by metonymy to the country's

    federal government, especially as opposed to provincial or municipal authorities.

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    Geography and climate

    Ottawa is situated on the south bank of the Ottawa River, and contains the mouths

    of the Rideau Riverand Rideau Canal. The oldest part of the city (including what

    remains ofBytown) is known as Lower Town, and occupies an area between the

    canal and the rivers. Across the canal to the west lies Centretown (often just called

    "downtown"), which is the city's financial and commercial hub. Situated between

    Centretown and the Ottawa River, the slight elevation of Parliament Hill is home to

    many of the capital's landmark government buildings, and the Legislative seat of

    Canada. As of June 29, 2007, the Rideau Canal, which stretches 202 km (126 mi)to Kingston, Fort Henry and four Martello towers in the Kingston area was

    recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    Ottawa is made up of eleven historic townships, ten of which are from historic

    Carleton County and one from historic Russell. They are Cumberland, Fitzroy,

    Gloucester, Goulbourn, Huntley, March, Marlborough, Nepean, North Gower,

    Osgoode and Torbolton.

    Climate

    Snow and ice are dominant during the winter season. Ottawa receives about 235

    centimetres (93 in) of snowfall annually. Its biggest snowfall was recorded on

    March 3-4, 1947 with 73 cm (2.5 feet) of snow.[6] Average January temperature is

    -10.8 C (13 F), although days well above freezing and nights below -25 C (-

    13 F) both occur in the winter. The snow season is quite variable; in an average

    winter, a lasting snow cover is on the ground from mid-December until early April,

    although some years are snow-free until beyond Christmas, particularly in recent

    years. The year 2007 was notable for having no lasting snow cover until the thirdweek of January. High wind chills are common, with annual averages of 51, 14 and

    1 days with wind chills below -20 C (-4 F), -30 C (-22 F) and -40 C (-40 F)

    respectively. The lowest recorded wind chill was of -47.8 C (-54.0 F) on January

    8, 1968.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottawa_Riverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rideau_Riverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rideau_Canalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bytownhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Townhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Townhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centretownhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliament_Hillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carleton_County%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_County%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzroy_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzroy_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloucester_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goulbourn_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlborough_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlborough_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepean_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Gower_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osgoode_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torbolton_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torbolton_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centimetrehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottawa#cite_note-snowfall1947-5%23cite_note-snowfall1947-5http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottawa_Riverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rideau_Riverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rideau_Canalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bytownhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Townhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centretownhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliament_Hillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carleton_County%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_County%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitzroy_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloucester_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goulbourn_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntley_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlborough_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nepean_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Gower_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osgoode_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torbolton_Township%2C_Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centimetrehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottawa#cite_note-snowfall1947-5%23cite_note-snowfall1947-5http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968
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    Freezing rain is also relatively common, even relative to other parts of

    the country. One such large storm caused power outages and affected

    the local economy, and came to be known as the 1998 Ice Storm.

    Provinces and territoriesCanada is a federation composed of ten provinces and three territories; in turn,

    these may be grouped into regions. Western Canada consists ofBritish

    Columbia and the three Prairie provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and

    Manitoba).Central Canada consists ofQuebec and Ontario.Atlantic Canada

    consists of the three Maritime provinces (New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island,

    and Nova Scotia), along with Newfoundland and Labrador. Eastern Canada

    refers to Central Canada and Atlantic Canada together. Three territories

    (Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut) make

    THE MOST IMPORTANT CITIES

    .Toronto, Ontario skyline with the CN Tower. Toronto is Canada's most populousmetropolitan area with 5,113,149 people.[67][68]

    Canada's 2006 census counted a total population of 31,612,897, anincrease of 5.4% since 2001.[69] Population growth is from immigrationand, to a lesser extent, natural growth. About three-quarters of Canada'spopulation live within 150 kilometers (90 mi) of the US border.[70] A similarproportion live in urban areas concentrated in the Quebec City-WindsorCorridor(notably the Greater Golden Horseshoe including Toronto and

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1998_Ice_Stormhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provincehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territory_(country_subdivision)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regions_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Prairieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albertahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatchewanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitobahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebechttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritimeshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Islandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newfoundland_and_Labradorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukonhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Territorieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunavuthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torontohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Towerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Towerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-TO_Pop-66http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-TO_CMA_Pop-67http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_2006_Censushttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-statscan_population_clock-68http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-69http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_City-Windsor_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_City-Windsor_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Horseshoehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torontohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Cntower2.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1998_Ice_Stormhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federationhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provincehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territory_(country_subdivision)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regions_of_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Prairieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albertahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskatchewanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manitobahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebechttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritimeshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Brunswickhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Islandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_Scotiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newfoundland_and_Labradorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yukonhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Territorieshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunavuthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torontohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontariohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CN_Towerhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-TO_Pop-66http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-TO_CMA_Pop-67http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_2006_Censushttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-statscan_population_clock-68http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_to_Canadahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada#cite_note-69http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_areahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_City-Windsor_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_City-Windsor_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Horseshoehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto
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    area, Montreal, and Ottawa), the BC Lower Mainland (consisting of theregion surrounding Vancouver), and the Calgary-Edmonton Corridor.

    Climate

    Snow and ice are dominant during the winter season. Ottawa receives about 235centimetres (93 in) of snowfall annually. Its biggest snowfall was recorded on March 3-4,

    1947 with 73 cm (2.5 feet) of snow. Average January temperature is -10.8 C (13 F),

    although days well above freezing and nights below -25 C (-13 F) both occur in the

    winter.

    The snow season is quite variable; in an average winter, a lasting snow cover is on the

    ground from mid-December until early April, although some years are snow-free until

    beyond Christmas, particularly in recent years. The year 2007 was notable for having no

    lasting snow cover until the third week of January. High wind chills are common, with

    annual averages of 51, 14 and 1 days with wind chills below -20 C (-4 F), -30 C (-22 F)

    and -40 C (-40 F) respectively. The lowest recorded wind chill was of -47.8 C (-54.0 F)

    onJanuary 8, 1968.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montrealhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Capital_Region_(Canada)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Mainlandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calgary-Edmonton_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centimetrehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montrealhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Capital_Region_(Canada)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lower_Mainlandhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouverhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calgary-Edmonton_Corridorhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inchhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centimetrehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_(unit)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_chillhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_8http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968
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    Multiplication (often denoted by the cross symbol ) is

    the mathematical operation of scaling one number by another. It is

    one of the four basic operations in elementary arithmetic(the others

    being addition, subtraction and division).

    Because the result of scaling by whole numbers can be thought of as

    consisting of some number of copies of the original, whole-number

    products greater than 1 can be computed by repeated addition; for

    example, 3 multiplied by 4 (often said as 3 times 4) can be

    calculated by adding 4 copies of 3 together:

    Here 3 and 4 are the factors and 12 is the product.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%97http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_(mathematics)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementary_arithmetichttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Additionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subtractionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_(mathematics)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_numberhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%97http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_(mathematics)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementary_arithmetichttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Additionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subtractionhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_(mathematics)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_number
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    CONCEPTUALIZATION

    How to Learn tables

    So ... train your memory!

    Tip 1: Order Does Not Matter

    When you multiply two numbers, it does not matter which is

    first or second, the answer is always the same.

    Example: 35=15, and 53=15

    Another Example: 29=18, and 92=18

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    In fact, it is like half of the table is

    a mirror image of the other!

    So, don't memorise both "35"and "53", just memorise that "a 3

    and a 5 make 15" when

    multiplied.

    This is very important! It nearly

    cuts the whole job in half.

    In your mind you should think of3 and 5 "together" making 15.

    so you should be thinking something

    like this: