Service Learning and Civic Engagement: Changing the Way We Educate Students

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  • Service Learning and Civic Engagement:Changing the Way We Educate Students

  • We challenge you to assure that the next years entering students will graduate as individuals of character more sensitive to the needs of community, more competent to contribute to society, and more civil in habits of thought, speech, and action.

    Wingspread Group Report on Higher Education (1993)

  • At a fundamental level, Dewey declared that Americans, as citizens, must be engaged both in thought and in action. He argued that education is the key to civic engagement. Therefore, institutions of learning must adequately prepare students for such activity and should be viewed as microcosms of society that should model community behavior.

    Thomas Ehrlich, et. al., Civic Responsibility and Higher Education (2000)

  • Too many of us have become passive and disengaged. Too many of us lack confidence in our capacity to make basic moral and civic judgments, to join with our neighbors to do the work of community, to make a difference. Never have we had so many opportunities for participation, yet rarely have we felt so powerless.In a time that cries out for civic action, we are in danger of becoming a nation of spectators.National Commission on Civic Renewal (1998)

  • Because some college students reflect the pattern of the larger society toward civic disengagement, one of the roles of higher education should be to find ways to renew and strengthen the commitment of students to civic life. It is critically important for the leadership of higher education to call on their institutions to play an active role in civic renewal.Karla Gottlieb and Gail Robinson, A Practical Guide for Integrating Civic Responsibility into the Curriculum (2002)

  • Higher Learning Commission (NCACS)Criterion Five: Engagement and ServiceThe organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Criterion Five: Engagement and Service3. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.4. Internal and external constituencies value services the organization provides.

  • Amy Driscoll, Carnegie Foundaton For The Advancement Of Teaching, 2006Carnegies New Classification for Campuses Engaged With CommunityNew elective classification:Community EngagementDescribes the collaboration between higher education institutions and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.

    Amy Driscoll, Carnegie Foundaton For The Advancement Of Teaching, 2006

  • Amy Driscoll, Carnegie Foundation For The Advancement Of Teaching, 2006Carnegies New Classification for Campuses Engaged With CommunityCommunity Engagement may achieve the following:Enhanced teaching and learning of relevant curriculumExpanded research and scholarshipPreparation of engaged citizensResponse to societal issuesContributions to the public goodStrengthened civic responsibility

    Amy Driscoll, Carnegie Foundation For The Advancement Of Teaching, 2006

  • What is Service Learning?

  • AACCs Definition of Service Learning

    The combination of community service and classroom instruction, with a focus on critical, reflective thinking as well as personal and civic responsibility.

  • How do you define civic responsibility?

  • AACCs Definition of Civic ResponsibilityActive participation in the public life of a community in an informed, committed, and constructive manner, with a focus on the common good.

  • Basic components of service learning:AcademicsServiceReflectionCivic Engagement/Responsibility

    Think of service learning as the vehicle for civic engagement to occur.

  • AACC Research Brief 01-3Service Learning in Community Colleges: 2003 National Survey ResultsNine out of 10 colleges responding to the survey either offer or are interested in service learning.Seventy-two percent of colleges that offer service learning include it in social science disciplines, and many colleges also include it in education, science, health, and languages. On average, colleges offer service learning in six different curricular areas.

    AACC Research Brief 01-3

  • AACC Research Brief 01-3Service Learning in Community Colleges: 2003 National Survey ResultsSeventy-six percent of colleges with service learning indicated that it is a course requirement, but usually for only a small number of courses.On average, colleges that provide service learning offer it in 18 different courses annually and involve 424 students in service learning projects.

    AACC Research Brief 01-3

  • AACC Research Brief 01-3Service Learning in Community Colleges: 2003 National Survey ResultsColleges have an average of 14 full-time and six part-time faculty teaching courses with service learning components.Most faculty participate in service learning because of their personal commitment and mentoring by other faculty.

    AACC Research Brief 01-3

  • AACC Research Brief 01-3Service Learning in Community Colleges: 2003 National Survey ResultsService learning programs are most often administered by a service learning director or coordinator or by individual faculty members in different disciplines.Most colleges rely on institutional funds to implement service learning initiatives. Other key areas of support come from the Corporation for National and Community Services and Federal Work-Study funds.

    AACC Research Brief 01-3

  • AACC Research Brief 01-3Institutionalizing Service Learning in Community CollegesIncrease the involvement of college administrators (including faculty leaders) in the program.Increase faculty awareness of the program and developing the skills to put service learning to use.Focus on incorporating as many best practices as possible to reach service learning institutionalization.

    AACC Research Brief 01-3

  • AACC 2006 Research Brief 05-3Transcending Disciplines, Reinforcing Curricula: Why Faculty Teach With Service LearningService Learning coordinator is the primary individual who motivates faculty to include service learning in their coursesStudents learning of core competencies is the primary outcome that motivates faculty to include service learning in their courses

    AACC 2006 Research Brief 05-3

  • Transcending Disciplines, Reinforcing Curricula: Why Faculty Teach With Service LearningFaculty are not motivated by any particular institutional support but rather by the benefits service learning provides to students and by the civic engagement opportunities service learning creates for students

  • AACC 2006, Dr. Mary PrenticeStudy of Student Civic EngagementService Learners who reported having taken two or more service learning courses compared to non-service learners:Service learners who had taken multiple service learning courses were statistically more likely to score higher on questions relating to participatory citizenship activities.Participatory citizens: participate in the civic affairs and social life of the community. These people organize the food drive to which personally responsible citizens contribute (Westheimer and Kahne, 2004).

    AACC 2006, Dr. Mary Prentice

  • Thank You!Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, its the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead

  • Exercise 3.9 (Page 34)Higher Educations Role in Promoting CitizenshipWe [higher education] educate a large proportion of the citizens who bother to vote, not to mention most of the politicians, journalists, and news commentators. We also educate all the school administrators and teachers, who in turn educate everyone at the pre-college level. And we do much to shape the pre-college curriculum through what we require of our college applicants. In short, not only have we helped create the problems that plague American democracy, but we are also in a position to begin doing something about them. If higher education doesnt start giving citizenship and democracy much greater priority, who will? (Astin 1995)

  • Exercise 3.9 (Page 34)Higher Educations Role in Promoting CitizenshipReflection Questions

    Do you think that our educational institutions are preparing students for a life of engaged, democratic citizenship?

    What specifically can higher education do to give citizenship and democracy greater priority?

    How can students and faculty play a leadership role?

    How can service learning and civic engagement relate to institutional accreditation standards?

  • Higher Learning Commission: Criterion FiveYou have been named the president of Civic Community College and have one year to prepare for an accreditation site visit. Your institutions regional accrediting body, the Higher Learning Commission, has a new criterion on service and engagement that each higher education institution must meet.

  • Higher Learning Commission: Criterion FiveYou need to document and provide evidence that the college is engaged in the local community. Where do you begin?

  • Higher Learning Commission: Criterion FiveWhich programs do you look at?Who should help you collect the needed data and examples?How will you measure your colleges level of engagement?How will you show the accrediting team that your college meets Criterion 5?Would your students agree with your findings?Would your community partners agree with your findings? Your Board?Will criterion five be part