Scouting in Primary - Klein Scouting...Scouting in Primary ... the Childrens Songbook . . . ... 2013 Little Philmont Cub Scouting Online Resources BSA National Resources

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Scouting in Primary * Handbook 2, Scouting Handbook Stake Ward Ward Primary STAKE PRESIDENCY 3.3 Under the direction of the stake presidency, the stake Primary presidency provides ongoing encouragement, support, and instruction for ward Primary presidencies. STAKE HIGH COUNCILOR 3.4 The stake presidency may assign a high councilor to assist the stake Primary presidency. The high councilor informs the stake Primary presidency of training opportunities and helps them provide support and assistance to the ward Primary organizations. STAKE PRIMARY PRESIDENCY 2.1 Stake Young Men and Primary presidencies also offer ongoing training and support for ward Young Men, Primary, and Scouting leaders. In addition, the BSA provides monthly roundtables to help leaders learn Scouting methods and skills; it also offers a variety of optional training courses such as Wood Badge, The Trainers EDGE, and others. BISHOPRIC *11.2.1 Responsibilities of the counselor assigned to oversee the ward Primary include directing the planning of the Priesthood Preview and overseeing Scouting for boys ages 8 through 11. *11.5.5 A member of the bishopric conducts the Priesthood Preview, and at least one member of the Primary presidency attends. Other leaders, including members of the deacons quorum presidency and Young Men presidency, may also attend . WARD PRIMARY PRESIDENCY 6.5 The ward Primary presidency, under the direction of a counselor in the bishopric, has responsibility for Scouting for eight-, nine-, ten-, and eleven-year-old boys. A member of the presidency is responsible to see that Scouting is organized appropriately. The presidency member should: 1. Register with Boy Scouts of America, receive BSA training, serve on the appropriate ward Scouting committee, and ensure that Church policies are followed. 2. Coordinate Scouting with the Faith in God program. 3. Encourage leaders to attend Scout training. PURPOSE OF SCOUTING 1.1 Priesthood and Primary Scouting can help young men and boys enhance close relationships with their families and the Church while developing strong and desirable traits of character, citizenship, and physical and mental fitness. Under priesthood leadership, Scouting can complement the efforts of Aaronic Priesthood quorums and Primary classes in building testimonies in young men and boys. Scouting under Church sponsorship should become an extension of the home, Primary classes, and Aaronic Priesthood quorums. Scouting functions as part of the Churchs activity program for boys and young men. * Handbook 2, Scouting Handbook Stake Ward Ward Primary 3.4 Under the direction of the stake presidency, the stake Primary presidency provides ongoing encouragement, support, and instruction for ward Primary presidencies. They coordinate support for the Scouting programs in each ward and encourage ward Primary Scout leaders to participate in basic and other approved training. 3.4 The stake Primary presidency may also help ward Primary presidencies understand Church Scouting policies and how the Scouting and Faith in God programs work together. STAKE AARONIC PRIESTHOOD COMMITTEE 3.2 The stake presidency may assign high councilors with assignments relating to the Aaronic Priesthood and Primary to meet as an Aaronic Priesthood committee to discuss Scouting-related matters (see Handbook 2, 15.3.2). 4. Visit Scout meetings and activities. 5. Help plan day camps . *11.5.3, 6.5 The Primary presidency ensures that all boys ages 8 through 11 are registered in the Scout program and that all Scout leaders are registered and receive proper training. SCOUT LEADERS *11.2.6 If a ward Primary holds Scouting activities for children ages 8 through 11, the activities may be planned and conducted by the teachers of these children or by other leaders the bishopric calls to fulfill these responsibilities (see 11.5.2 and 11.5.3). SCOUT COMMITTEES 4.3 When more than one Scouting committee exists in the ward, members of the Primary presidency should be assigned as follows: (1) the member responsible for the eleven-year-old boys serves on the Boy Scout troop committee and (2) the member responsible for eight-, nine-, and ten-year-old Scouting serves on the Cub Scout pack committee. FAITH IN GOD 6.0 In Primary, the Faith in God program should be coordinated with Scouting to lay a foundation that prepares a boy to keep his baptismal covenants, better serve his family, and receive the priesthood. Scouting supports boys and their families by giving them an additional opportunity to put into practice the gospel principles they learn at home and in Primary. Parental involvement and help is a key to success in this program. 6.5 A member of the ward Primary presidency should coordinate Scouting with the Faith in God program . *11.5.3 To maintain a gospel focus in Scout activities, leaders use the Faith in God for Boys guidebook as one of their resources. As boys fulfill requirements in the guide- book, they also qualify for religious awards in Scouting. *11.5.1 The Faith in God program helps boys ages 8 through 11 live gospel principles, develop testimonies, and prepare to be righteous Aaronic Priesthood holders. The ward Primary president ensures that each boy who reaches age 8 receives a copy of Faith in God for Boys. She helps parents understand that they can use these guidebooks as resources for activities with individual children and with the entire family. FAITH IN GOD AND CUB SCOUTING Possible Activity Correlations from www.lds.org Faith in God and Scouting: Interactive Training January 2004 FAITH IN GOD WOLF BEAR WEBELOS Basic Requirements Achievement 11 Achievement 1 Webelos Badge, Requirement 8 Learning and Living the Gospel Give a family home evening lesson on Joseph Smiths First Vision . . . Achievement 11a Achievement 1 Webelos Badge, Requirement 8 Read D&C 89. Discuss how Heavenly Father blesses us when we faithfully live the Word of Wisdom . . . Achievement 11b, c Achievement 9c, g Activity Badge: Fitness Prepare a pedigree chart . . . Achievement 11 Achievement 8d Webelos Badge, Requirement 8 Serving Others Write a letter to a teacher, your parents, or your grandparents . . . Elective 21b Achievement 18b Communicator 11 Plan, prepare, and serve a nutritious meal. Achievement 8c, e Achievement 9c, g Family Member 11, Fitness 3, Outdoorsman 8 Developing Talents Learn to sing, play, or lead a song from the Childrens Songbook . . . Elective 11d, e, f Elective 8 Activity Badge: Showman 8, 9 Visit an art museum or attend a concert, play, or other cultural event. . . . Achievement 10c, f Achievement 10a Activity Badge: Showman 17, Naturalist 4 As you familiarize yourself with the Faith in God for Boys guidebook you will find many opportunities to make it a part of your regular Scouting program. Occasionally, you may want to devote an activity day/den meeting exclusively to the Faith in God activities. Cub Scouting prepares a boy to be self reliant and dependablea person of worth, a caring individual.1 Adding Faith in God prepares a boy to receive and honor the priesthood of God. 1Wolf Handbook, p. 1. 2013 Little Philmont Cub Scouting Online Resources BSA National Resources http://www.scouting.org/sitecore/content/Home/CubScouts.aspx - Home page for Cub Scouting at the BSA National website explore and discover! http://www.scouting.org/sitecore/content/Home/CubScouts/CubScouts/UniformsAndAwards/sanda.aspx Cub Scout Academics and Sports Program requirements (Belt Loops and Pins) http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Leaders/DenLeaderResources/DenandPackMeetingResourceGuide.aspx Den and Pack Meeting Resource Guide Links to individual den and pack meeting plans in pdf as in the print book . http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Leaders/DenLeaderResources/DenandPackMeetingResourceGuide/PackMeetingPlans.aspx Pack meeting plans (including supplemental pack meeting plans) for a total of 48 pack meeting plans based on monthly core values. http://www.scouting.org/stem/Awards.aspx Information and requirements for the STEM/Nova Awards http://www.scouting.org/filestore/training/pdf/What_makes_a_trained_leader.pdf What Makes a Trained Leader? Document http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/HealthandSafety/GSS/toc.aspx Guide to Safe Scouting https://www.scoutstuff.org/ Online Scout Shop Area Council Resources www.samhoustonbsa.org Sam Houston Area Council http://www.3riversbsa.org Three Rivers Council http://www.bacbsa.org/ - Bay Area Council http://www.calcasieubsa.org Calcasieu Area Council http://www.samhoustonbsa.org/leader_resources/unit_programing/instep Sam Houston Area Councils InSTEP resource page LDS Resources https://www.lds.org/callings/primary/leader-resources/scouting-in-primary?lang=eng Scouting in Primary website. Click on Cub Scouting and then scroll down to see all information on the page. http://broadcast.lds.org/eLearning/pth/faith-i-god-and-scouting-training-module/load.html Faith in God and Cub Scouting Interactive Training https://www.lds.org/bc/content/shared/content/english/pdf/scouting-handbook-2012.pdf?lang=eng LDS Scouting Handbook 2012 http://ldsbsa.org/ LDS-BSA Relationships website http://kleinstake.org/littlephilmont2013/docs/cubscouts Handouts (and MORE!) from the Houston Area Little Philmont Cub Scouting Session 2013 1. Citizenship: Contributing service and showing responsibility to local, state, and national communities.2. Compassion: Being kind and considerate, and showing concern for the well-being of others.3. Cooperation: Being helpful and working together with others toward a common goal.4. Courage: Being brave and doing what is right regardless of our fears, the difficulties, or the consequences.5. Faith: Having inner strength and confidence based on our trust in God.6. Health and Fitness: Being personally committed to keeping our minds andbodies clean and fit.CHARACTER DEVELOPMENTSince its origin, the Scouting program has been an educational experience concerned with values. In 1910, the first activities for Scouts were designed to build character, physical fitness, practical skills, and service. These elements were part of the original Cub Scout program and continue to be part of Cub Scouting today.Character development should extend into every aspect of a boy's life. Character development should also extend into every aspect of Cub Scouting. Cub Scout leaders should strive to use Cub Scouting's 12 core values throughout all elements of the program-service projects, ceremonies, games, skits, songs, crafts, and all the other activities enjoyed at den and pack meetings.Cub Scouting's 12 Core Values7. Honesty: Telling the truth and being worthy of trust.8. Perseverance: Sticking with something and not giving up, even if it is difficult.9. Positive Attitude: Being cheerful and setting our minds to look for and find the best in all situations.10. Resourcefulness: Using human and other resources to their fullest.11. Respect: Showing regard for the worth of something or someone.12. Responsibility: Fulfilling our duty to God, country, other people, and ourselves.12 Core Values and The Scout LawBoy Scouts learn and strive to live by the Scout Law:A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, dean, and reverent.Many of the core values of Cub Scouting relate directly to the Scout Law:Core Value Scout LawCompassion KindCooperation HelpfulCourage BraveHealth and Fitness CleanHonesty TrustworthyPositive Attitude CheerfulCharacter can be defined as the collection of core values possessed by an individual that leads to moral commitment and action.Character development should challenge Cub Scouts to experience core values in six general areas: God, world, country, community, family, and self.Character is "values in action."ckPCommit: Character development includes attention to moral motivation. Children must be committed to doing what they know is right. They must be able to understand the perspectives of others, to consider how others feel, and to develop an active moral conscience.Why is this core value important? What makes living out this core value different? What will it take to live out this core value?Practice: Character development includes the development of moral habits through guided practice. Children need opportunities to practice the social and emotional skills necessary for doing what is right but difficult, and to experience the core values in their lives.How can I act according to this core value? How do I live out this core value? How can I practice this value at school, at home, and with my friends?To make Character Connections anIntegral part of Cub Scouting, the12 core values are being integratedThrough out the boys' handbooks and advancement program.Program support for character development can be found in Cub Scout Program Helps, in the Cub Scout Leader Book, and at your monthly roundtable meetings.Remember: Core values are the basis of good character development. Character must be broadly defined to include thinking, feeling, and behavior. Core values should be promoted throughout all phases of life.Commit: Character development includes attention to moral motivation. Children must be committed to doing what they know is right. They must be able to understand the perspectives of others, to consider how others feel, and to develop an active moral conscience.Core values are the basis of good character development.Character must be broadly defined to include thinking, feeling, and behavior.Core values should be promoted throughout all phases of life.Why is this core value important? What makes living out this core value different? What will it take to live out this core value?Practice: Character development includes the development of moral habits through guided practice. Children need opportunities to practice the social and emotional skills necessary for doing what is right but difficult, and to experience the core values in their lives.To make Character Connections anIntegral part of Cub Scouting, the12 core values are being integratedThrough out the boys' handbooks and advancement program.Program support for character development can be found in in the and at your monthly roundtable meetings.How can I act according to this core value? How do I live out this core value? How can I practice this value at school, at home, and with my friends?Cub Scout Program Helps, Cub Scout Leader Book, Remember: Character Connections TMThe goals of the Cub Scout leader are to seek out and maximize the many opportunities to incorporate character development to convince the young Cub Scout that character is important to the individual, to his family, community, country, world, and GodCharacter development should not be viewed as something done occasionally as part of a separate program, or as part of only one area of life. For in reality, character development is a part of everything a Cub Scout does. Character development lessons can be found in every aspect of the Cub Scouting experience.When it comes to developing character, the complete person must be considered. Character development involves at least three critical areas:1-Know (thought)2-Commit (feeling)3-Practice (behavior)In Cub Scouting, addressing these three critical areas and relating them to values is referred to as Character Connections.Character Connections asks the Cub Scout to:Know: Character development includes moral knowledge-both awareness and reasoning. For example, children must understand what honesty means and they must be able to reason about and interpret each situation, and then decide how to apply the principles of honesty.What do I think or know about the core value? How does the context of this situation affect this core value? What are some historical, literary, or religious examples representing the core value?The goals of the Cub Scout leader are to seek out and maximize the many opportunities to incorporate character development to convince the young Cub Scout that character is important to the individual, to his family, community, country, world, and GodCharacter development should not be viewed as something done occasionally as part of a separate program, or as part of only one area of life. For in reality, character development is a part of everything a Cub Scout does. Character development lessons can be found in every aspect of the Cub Scouting experience.When it comes to developing character, the complete person must be considered. Character development involves at least three critical areas:1-Know (thought)2-Commit (feeling)3-Practice (behavior)In Cub Scouting, addressing these three critical areas and relating them to values is referred to as Character development includes moral knowledge-both awareness and reasoning. For example, children must understand what honesty means and they must be able to reason about and interpret each situation, and then decide how to apply the principles of honesty.Character Connections. Character Connections asks the Cub Scout to:Know:What do I think or know about the core value? How does the context of this situation affect this core value? What are some historical, literary, or religious examples representing the core value?2003 Boy Scouts of America13-323AThis pull-out sheet is designed to be easy to photocopy when you need multiple copies. 2013 PrintingAge-AppropriAte guidelines for scouting ActivitiesAge- and rank-appropriate guidelines have been developed based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity of Boy Scouts of America youth members. These guidelines apply to Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews.Tiger Cubs (WiTh AdulT PArTner) Wolf/beAr Cub sCouTsWebelos sCouTs boy sCouTsolder boy sCouTs, VArsiTy sCouTs, And VenTurersouTdoor skillsCamporees Visit onlyConservation ProjectsCooking outdoorsfire buildingfishingfueled devices (Stoves and lanterns)hikingdayhikingMultiple dayhorseback ridinghunting Venturers onlyMap and Compass Map onlyMountain boardsMountaineering/scrambling/Cross-Country TravelorienteeringPioneeringrope bridges/Pioneering Towers (Check requirements for height restrictions.)survival TrainingWinter CampingsPorTsfield/Wide gamesflag footballgymnasticsice hockeyice skatingMartial Artsdefensiveroller blades/skatesscootersnonmotorizedskateboardingskiing/snowboardingsledding/Tubingsoccerstreet hockeyToolsAxesbow sawshand Axhand ToolsPocketknife bear onlyTrekkingbackpackingovernight, backcountrybike Treksday ridebike TreksMultiple overnightsbMX bikingday hikeshorse TreksMountain bikingsearch and rescue Missionssearch and rescue Practiceski TouringMultiple days and nights Carrying gearAirCrAfTCommercial flight experienceground schoolhands-on flying experiencehot-Air balloons (Tethered only)orientation flightsoaring (Orientation flights only)NThis pull-out sheet is designed to be easy to photocopy when you need multiple copies.*Exceptions may be made for authorized pilot programs operated by a council under a formal memorandum of understanding.Age-AppropriAte guidelines for scouting ActivitiesAge- and rank-appropriate guidelines have been developed based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity of Boy Scouts of America youth members. These guidelines apply to Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews.Tiger Cubs (WiTh AdulT PArTner) Wolf/beAr Cub sCouTsWebelos sCouTs boy sCouTsolder boy sCouTs, VArsiTy sCouTs, And VenTurersVehiClesAll-Terrain Vehicles (ATV) Approved Council use only; no unit usedirt bikes Venturers onlydriving derbiesPersonal Watercraft (PWC) Approved Council use only; no unit usesnowmobilesshooTing.22 rifleAir rifle (Pellet Guns) Webelos resident Camp onlyArcheryfieldArcheryTarget, Action (Moving targets) Council/district outdoor Programs onlybb guns Council/district outdoor Programs onlyCatapultslarge-bore rifles Venturers onlyMuzzleloadersPistols* Venturers onlyshotgunsslingshots Council/district outdoor Programs onlyCliMbingbelayingboulderingCanopy ToursCaving (Other than simple novice activities)ClimbingCommercial or horizontal WallClimbingrock ClimbingVertical Wall or Tower initiative gameslead ClimbingProject CoPe A few low-Course and high-Course Activitiesrappellingsnow and ice ClimbingAQuATiCsCanoeingflat Water Council/district outdoor Programs onlyCanoeingflowing Waterkayakingflat Water Council/district outdoor Programs onlykayakingflowing WaterMotorboatingAdult operated Council/district outdoor Programs onlyMotorboatingyouth operatedraftingflat Water Council/district outdoor Programs onlyraftingflowing Waterrowingflat Water Council/district outdoor Programs onlyrowingflowing WatersailboardingsailingAdult operated Council/district outdoor Programs onlysailingyouth operatedscubasnorkeling (In clear, confined waters, all ages and abilities can use snorkeling equipment. Snorkeling in open water is limited to Boy Scouts with Snorkeling BSA or equivalent.)surfingswimmingTubing (Floating in an inner tube) Council/district flat Water eventsTow sports (including waterskiing, wakeboarding, kneeboarding, and tubing) CAMPingday Campden overnightsCamporeesfamily Campinghigh AdventureJamboreeParent/son overnightsresident CampWeekend overnights2013 PrintingSuper Buzzer! Materials: 2 pencil eraser toppers per Cub Scout 1 Craft stick per Cub Scout 3X5 card per Cub Scout Scissors Ruler Pencils, markers or crayons for decorating Stapler with staples 1 yard of string per Cub Scout Large flat rubber band (size 64) - 1 per Cub Scout Directions: 1. Cut the 3x5 card down to a 3x3 size and then decorate your buzzer by drawing any design that you would like. 2. Take your craft stick and erasers and put an eraser on each end of the craft stick. 3. Center an edge of the card on the craft stick between the two erasers. 4. Staple the centered edge of the card to the craft stick. 5. Near one of the erasers, tie the string to the craft stick between the card and eraser. 6. Now for the real buzzing sound! Stretch the large rubber band around the eraser ends on the craft stick. 7. Check your space so that you dont hit anyone and swing the buzzer in a circle above your head or in front of you. You should hear a buzzing sound. Safety: Make sure that Cub Scouts have plenty of space to swing the buzzer around so that everyone will be safe from flying buzzers. Troubleshooting: If you dont hear a buzzing sound, try bending the free corners of your card a little bit. That may produce more sound. You could also try turning your knot of yarn a bit.

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