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366 each 2; and asphyxiation, sunstroke, privation, lightning, and explosion, 1 each. The 44 doctors who ended their lives by suicide selected the following methods: Firearms, 17; poison, 15: cutting instruments, 5 ; cause not stated, 3; strangulation, 2; and asphyxiation and jumping from a high place, each 1. Of the 21 homicides, 18 were due to firearms, 1 to hanging, and 2 to other means, and of these deaths 7 occurred in feuds or affrays. Two medical men died in prison, and 9 lost their lives either in battle on land or by the sinking of ships on which they were medical officers. Concern- ing the civil positions of those who died, 1 had been a member of Congress, 2 governors of states, 4 United States consuls, 11 members of State senates, 39 members of the lower houses of legislatures; 35 had been mayors, 33 aldermen, 52 had served as justices of the peace, as clerks in the government service, or in various other civil positions; 15 had been postmasters; 24 editors of medical or lay journals; 19 had been clergymen, of whom 4 were foreign missionaries; 4 had been attorneys; 107 druggists; 40 bankers; 16 medical directors of life insurance companies; 10 dentists; 3 presidents of railway companies; 6 surgeons on steamships; and 4 chemists. The labour of compiling such a summary must be very considerable, and we are indebted to the American Medical Association for the interesting light which it throws on the career of the medical practitioner on the other side of the Atlantic. Violent death, whether self-inflicted or from with- out, is startlingly frequent, and in the opposite sense, death from old age shows a higher figure than might have been expected. The variety of civil position is also worthy of note. No such figures are available in this country, and an over- worked Registrar-General’s staff could hardly be asked to supply them at the present time. But we should expect to find that the medical man in this country leads, on the average, a more strictly pro- fessional life than his colleagues across the water, dies much less often from violence, but more rarely reaches the quiet cessation of his activities in an extreme old age. IT is the intention of the Queen to unveil the memorial to Florence Nightingale in the crypt of St. Paul’s Cathedral on Monday next, Feb. 14th. The memorial has been erected by the sculptor, Mr. Arthur G. Walker. Professor Arthur Keith is giving a course of lectures on the Anatomy of the Human Body for first-aid and ambulance students in the theatre of the Royal College of Surgeons, Lincoln’s Inn-fields, at 5.30 P.M., on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, from Feb. 14th to May 5th. Illustrative anatomical specimens will be on exhibition in the theatre from 4-7 P.M. on each lecture day, and from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. on the succeeding day in the hall of the museum. ____ j AT the Section of Odontology of the Royal Society J of Medicine a debate will be held on Monday, J Feb. 28th, at 5.30 P.M., to discuss War Injuries of i the Jaws. An exhibition of dental splints and other 1 apparatus illustrating the subject will be open from < Tuesday, Feb. 22nd, to Monday, Feb. 28th, between " 11 and 6.30. Anyone wishing to exhibit is asked to 1 communicate with the honorary secretary by the 1 14th instant. Members of the Section of Surgery 1 are specially invited to the debate. 1 SCOTLAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) The Midwives (Scotland) Act, 1915: The Central Midwives Board for Scotland. THE Central Midwives Board for Scotland has been provisionally constituted as follows, the appointing body being added to the names in brackets: Sir Archibald Buchan-Hepburn (Associa- tion of County Councils for Scotland), Sir Robert Kirk Inches (Convention of the Royal Burghs of Scotland), The Lady Susan Gordon-Gilmour (Queen Victoria Jubilee Institute for Nurses: Scottish Branch), Dr. Archibald Campbell Munro (Society of Medical Officers of Health of Scotland), Professor Sir John Halliday Croom (University Courts of the Universities of Edinburgh and St. Andrews, con. jointly), Professor Murdoch Cameron (University Courts of the Universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen, conjointly), Dr. James Haig Ferguson (Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, and Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, conjointly), and Dr. Michael Dewar and Dr. John Wishart Kerr (Scottish Committee of British Medical Association), The Lord President of the Council can nominate three members of the Board, but as yet has appointed only Lady Balfour of Burleigh. The Local Government Board of Scotland has issued a circular to the local authorities calling their attention to those provisions of the Midwives (Scotland) Act which directly affect them. The circular gives a summary of the local authority’s duties of superintendence and supervision under sections 16 and 17, and points out that it may delegate its powers and duties to a committee; it also calls attention to the obligation likely to be laid upon such authorities to contribute to the general expenses of the Central Midwives Board when the fees payable by candidates for registration prove insufficient for the purpose. One of the provisions of immediate interest to which attention is directed is that by which local supervising authorities are authorised to contribute towards the training of midwives within or without their respective areas in such manner and to such extent as may be approved by the Local Government Board. Edinburgh University Court. At a recent court of Edinburgh University, on the recommendation of the Senatus, it was resolved that students who had attested and had been accepted for military service, and who had com. pleted five terms of study of anatomy, should be permitted to appear for the professional examina- tion in anatomy in March next. It was resolved also that, for the present year, students who com- menced medical study in winter, and who are now in their third year, should be allowed to appear for examination in March next, instead of in the following July. It was intimated that the sum of R237 has -been received from the Scottish Association for the Medical Education of Women for the purpose of founding a prize for women medical students. The precise conditions of award will be announced later. The following additional examiners were appointed: Dr. George Pratt Yule, Medical Officer of Health, Fifeshire (Public Health Laboratory Work); Professor H. R. Dean, Victoria University of Manchester (Pathology); Dr. W. G. Aitchison Robertson (Forensic Medicine); Dr. Charles Porter, Medical Officer of Health,

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each 2; and asphyxiation, sunstroke, privation,lightning, and explosion, 1 each. The 44 doctorswho ended their lives by suicide selected thefollowing methods: Firearms, 17; poison, 15:cutting instruments, 5 ; cause not stated, 3;strangulation, 2; and asphyxiation and jumpingfrom a high place, each 1. Of the 21 homicides, 18were due to firearms, 1 to hanging, and 2 to othermeans, and of these deaths 7 occurred in feuds oraffrays. Two medical men died in prison, and 9 losttheir lives either in battle on land or by the sinking of ’

ships on which they were medical officers. Concern-ing the civil positions of those who died, 1 had beena member of Congress, 2 governors of states, 4 UnitedStates consuls, 11 members of State senates, 39members of the lower houses of legislatures; 35had been mayors, 33 aldermen, 52 had served asjustices of the peace, as clerks in the governmentservice, or in various other civil positions; 15 hadbeen postmasters; 24 editors of medical or layjournals; 19 had been clergymen, of whom 4 wereforeign missionaries; 4 had been attorneys; 107druggists; 40 bankers; 16 medical directors of lifeinsurance companies; 10 dentists; 3 presidents ofrailway companies; 6 surgeons on steamships; and 4chemists. The labour of compiling such a summarymust be very considerable, and we are indebted tothe American Medical Association for the interestinglight which it throws on the career of the medicalpractitioner on the other side of the Atlantic.Violent death, whether self-inflicted or from with-out, is startlingly frequent, and in the oppositesense, death from old age shows a higher figurethan might have been expected. The variety ofcivil position is also worthy of note. No suchfigures are available in this country, and an over-worked Registrar-General’s staff could hardly beasked to supply them at the present time. But weshould expect to find that the medical man in thiscountry leads, on the average, a more strictly pro-fessional life than his colleagues across the water,dies much less often from violence, but more rarelyreaches the quiet cessation of his activities in anextreme old age.

IT is the intention of the Queen to unveil thememorial to Florence Nightingale in the crypt ofSt. Paul’s Cathedral on Monday next, Feb. 14th. Thememorial has been erected by the sculptor, Mr.Arthur G. Walker.

Professor Arthur Keith is giving a course oflectures on the Anatomy of the Human Body forfirst-aid and ambulance students in the theatre ofthe Royal College of Surgeons, Lincoln’s Inn-fields,at 5.30 P.M., on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays,from Feb. 14th to May 5th. Illustrative anatomicalspecimens will be on exhibition in the theatre from4-7 P.M. on each lecture day, and from 10 A.M. to5 P.M. on the succeeding day in the hall of themuseum.

____ j

AT the Section of Odontology of the Royal Society Jof Medicine a debate will be held on Monday, JFeb. 28th, at 5.30 P.M., to discuss War Injuries of ithe Jaws. An exhibition of dental splints and other 1apparatus illustrating the subject will be open from <

Tuesday, Feb. 22nd, to Monday, Feb. 28th, between "

11 and 6.30. Anyone wishing to exhibit is asked to 1communicate with the honorary secretary by the 114th instant. Members of the Section of Surgery 1are specially invited to the debate. 1

SCOTLAND.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.)

The Midwives (Scotland) Act, 1915: The CentralMidwives Board for Scotland.

THE Central Midwives Board for Scotland hasbeen provisionally constituted as follows, the

appointing body being added to the names inbrackets: Sir Archibald Buchan-Hepburn (Associa-tion of County Councils for Scotland), Sir RobertKirk Inches (Convention of the Royal Burghs ofScotland), The Lady Susan Gordon-Gilmour (QueenVictoria Jubilee Institute for Nurses: ScottishBranch), Dr. Archibald Campbell Munro (Society ofMedical Officers of Health of Scotland), ProfessorSir John Halliday Croom (University Courts of theUniversities of Edinburgh and St. Andrews, con.jointly), Professor Murdoch Cameron (UniversityCourts of the Universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen,conjointly), Dr. James Haig Ferguson (Royal Collegeof Physicians of Edinburgh, Royal College ofSurgeons of Edinburgh, and Royal Faculty ofPhysicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, conjointly),and Dr. Michael Dewar and Dr. John Wishart Kerr(Scottish Committee of British Medical Association),The Lord President of the Council can nominatethree members of the Board, but as yet has appointedonly Lady Balfour of Burleigh.The Local Government Board of Scotland has

issued a circular to the local authorities callingtheir attention to those provisions of the Midwives(Scotland) Act which directly affect them. Thecircular gives a summary of the local authority’sduties of superintendence and supervision undersections 16 and 17, and points out that it may delegateits powers and duties to a committee; it also callsattention to the obligation likely to be laid uponsuch authorities to contribute to the generalexpenses of the Central Midwives Board when thefees payable by candidates for registration proveinsufficient for the purpose. One of the provisionsof immediate interest to which attention is directedis that by which local supervising authorities areauthorised to contribute towards the training ofmidwives within or without their respective areasin such manner and to such extent as may beapproved by the Local Government Board.

Edinburgh University Court.At a recent court of Edinburgh University, on

the recommendation of the Senatus, it was resolvedthat students who had attested and had been

accepted for military service, and who had com.pleted five terms of study of anatomy, should bepermitted to appear for the professional examina-tion in anatomy in March next. It was resolvedalso that, for the present year, students who com-menced medical study in winter, and who are

now in their third year, should be allowed toappear for examination in March next, instead ofin the following July. It was intimated that thesum of R237 has -been received from the ScottishAssociation for the Medical Education of Womenfor the purpose of founding a prize for womenmedical students. The precise conditions of awardwill be announced later. The following additionalexaminers were appointed: Dr. George PrattYule, Medical Officer of Health, Fifeshire (PublicHealth Laboratory Work); Professor H. R. Dean,Victoria University of Manchester (Pathology); Dr.W. G. Aitchison Robertson (Forensic Medicine);Dr. Charles Porter, Medical Officer of Health,

Page 2: SCOTLAND

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Marylebone (Public Health, &c.); and Dr. George F.Barbour Simpson (Midwifery).

Edinburgh Insurance Committee.At a meeting of the Administration Subcommittee

of the Edinburgh Insurance Committee the clerksubmitted a statement of payments to doctors andchemists during the year 1915. The payments todoctors amounted to JE25.448 10s. 8d., as against.t30,802 3s. 2d. during 1914. The payments forthe year 1915 were by way of an advance at therate of ls. 4d. per person on each doctor’s list,pending an adjustment of the lists as regardspersons who have joined H.M. Forces and are nolonger entitled to medical benefit. The paymentsto chemists for supply of drugs, medicines, &c.,during 1915 amounted to JE5823 14s. 5!2d., as againstJE6898 2s. 6d. for 1914. The amounts paid forOctober, November, and December, 1915, repre-sent 90 per cent. of amounts claimed, 10 per cent.having been retained pending a complete check ofthe prescription forms for these months. The listof doctors under agreement with the EdinburghInsurance Committee as revised in January num-bers 119. There are 108 chemists and dealers inappliances, and half-a-dozen dealers in prescribedappliances only.

The RoyaZ Public Dispensary, Edinburgh.The annual meeting in connexion with the Royal

Public Dispensary of Edinburgh was held in theCity Chambers on Jan. 29th, Lord Provost SirRobert Inches presiding. Mr. R. C. Gray, S.S.C.,the honorary secretary, submitted the annual

Ireport of the managers, which stated that thepast year was the 139th of the history of the dis-pensary, and that even in the special and tryingconditions the institution continued to do muchgood work among the suffering poor and to main-tain its place among the charities of the city. Thedispensary provided advice, medicines, and surgicalappliances and assistance, all free of charge, andthe number who had been relieved during the pastyear is 3241, those who had been attended at theirown homes 1420. The operation of the InsuranceAct, as was to be expected, had affected the numberof adult working men who applied to the institu-tion ; but another cause of the diminution of thenumbers was the impossibility of maintainingthe normal attendance of the medical staff at thepresent time. Six out of the eight ordinary phy-sicians are absent on active service. The managersfelt that special acknowledgment was due to Dr.J. G. Cattanach and Dr. G. D. Mathewson and alsoto Dr. A. B. Darling, who, with the assistance ofmedical students, had done their utmost to giveattention and care to the patients.

Medical Service for Highlands and Islands.In a large number of northern parishes medical

practitioners have concluded agreements with theHighlands and Islands Medical Service Board,under which they will give medical attendance tothe families and dependants of insured persons,uninsured persons of the crofter and cottar class,with their families and dependants, and others insimilar circumstances who would find an ordinaryfee for medical attendance too heavy for them. Thearrangement is that the doctors shall charge thesepersons a sum not exceeding 5s. for first visit and2s. 6d. for each succeeding visit in the same illness,the distance of the patient’s house from the doctor’smaking no difference to the fee. An additionalmoderate fee is chargeable when the practitionersupplies the medicine. The midwifery fee, including

fees for subsequent visits if necessary, has beenfixed at JE1. The board has issued for use in thevarious districts under its jurisdiction notices.which can be used as posters explanatory of itsobjects and scope. Under the explanatory para-graphs, which are, of course, of general application,is printed a schedule giving the names of themedical men whose services are to be had inthe particular district for which the notice isintended, together with the area within whichthey have agreed to give attendance.Feb. 7tb.

IRELAND.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.)

The Gratitude of a Board of Guardians.SOME weeks ago the Enniscorthy guardians

granted to Mr. T. J. Kelly, one of their medicalofficers, on his retirement a superannuationallowance of JE100 a year. He had spent 38 yearsin their service. Mr. Kelly wrote to the LocalGovernment Board, pointing out that he had notbeen granted the full allowance to which he con-sidered himself entitled. The guardians, takingumbrage at his action, thereupon rescinded theirprevious resolution and fixed his retiring allowanceat .f:SO per annum. The decision was declaredlymade, in the words of the guardian who moved theresolution, "to punish the doctor for writing to theLocal Government Board." The incident is illus-trative of the unfortunate position of the Poor-lawmedical officer as regards retiring allowance in thathe is entirely dependent on the will of theguardians.

A Medical Mayor.Mr. J. J. O’Sullivan, L.R.C.S.Irel., has been elected

Mayor of Waterford. He has been for some timean alderman of that city, and has filled the office ofHigh Sheriff. Mr. O’Sullivan is an active memberof the Irish Medical Committee, and an examinerat the Apothecaries’ Hall.

The Foster Green Hospital, Belfast.At the annual meeting of the friends of this

hospital, held on Jan. 25th, it was reported that237 patients were treated during the year 1915,as against 323 in 1914. On the other hand, theaverage period of treatment was 20’5 weeks as

against 13’49 weeks in 1914. It is interesting tonote that while the subscriptions were a few poundsdown, the total amount in the household expenses(despite the increase of prices) was increased byonly 120 upon an expenditure of .f:2S00. It is pro-posed to pay off .S672 of the building debt insteadof J51000. One of the clerical speakers criticisedthe city corporation of Belfast for a very seriousomission in their tuberculosis scheme in failing toprovide for the inspection of schools, which, hesaid, in Belfast were " hot-beds of disease, and theywould never get this scourge (consumption) undercontrol until they adopted a system of schoolmedical inspection." School medical inspection is,however, likely to be inadequately performed duringthe war.

The Belfast Hospital for Sick Children.At the annual meeting of the supporters of this

charity, held on Jan. 27th, the report presented bythe medical staff showed that 631 intern and 4034extern cases were treated during 1915. Theclinics are being largely attended by senior medicalstudents. The financial statement indicated that