School of Arts and Humanities ENGL401 History of the English ...

  • Published on
    02-Jan-2017

  • View
    214

  • Download
    0

Transcript

<ul><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p>School of Arts and Humanities ENGL401 </p><p>History of the English Language 3 Credit Hours 8 Week Course </p><p>Prerequisites: ENGL101 and ENGL200 Table of Contents </p><p> Course Description Evaluation Procedures Course Scope Course Outline Course Objectives Policies Course Delivery Method Academic Services Course Materials </p><p> Course Description (Catalog) </p><p> ENGL401 History of the English Language (3 hrs) This course will provide students with a foundation in the history and linguistics of the English language. The course will emphasize social, political, and other external historical events influencing language change, as well as the internal history of the language. Attention will be given to the various language systems (personal identity, phonetics, phonology, morphology, graphics, syntax, lexicon, language variation, historical linguistics, language and the brain, and semantics), as well as to the literature from the different historical periods. </p><p> Table of Contents </p><p> Course Scope </p><p>Over the course of the semester, you will learn how English emerged as a distinct language from a mix of various Germanic forms with later influences from a wide variety of language groups. We will touch on the development of the lexicon, pronunciation, spelling, and grammar from Old English to the various dialects that span the globe today. Particular attention will be given to gender differentiation, social variation, and regional variation in preparation for the final essay. </p><p>Table of Contents Course Objectives </p><p>Objectives: By the end of the term you should demonstrate an ability to do the following tasks: </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p> Evaluate the main influences that combined to push Old English forward as a distinct language. </p><p> Demonstrate familiarity with advanced linguistic terminology as a foundation for further study. </p><p> Assess the key ways in which the language continues to evolve to meet the needs of different communities of speakers. </p><p> Categorize and justify the ways in which cultural, social, and historical differences have influenced the </p><p>development of modern English. </p><p> Appraise the various influences on spelling and language reform. </p><p> Through short reading and writing assignments, build skills in linguistic analysis. </p><p> Engage in thoughtful discussion with academic peers via discussion forum posts. </p><p> Write a thoughtful, well-organized essay that analyzes language in one (or two) works of literature, e.g. the ways language defines gender, social class, and region. </p><p> Table of Contents </p><p> Course Delivery Method </p><p> This course on the English language delivered via distance learning will enable students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system will be made available to each student. Expect to have two assignments due each week. Online assignments are due by midnight Wednesday and midnight Sunday EST of each week as stated in this syllabus and in the lessons. If there are any questions about when assignments are due, please ask me. At the end of the course, you will have one week to complete the final portfolio project. Assigned faculty will support the students throughout this eight-week course. </p><p> Table of Contents </p><p> Course Materials </p><p>Required Texts: </p><p>Crystal, David. The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2003. Print. </p><p> Students will also be required to obtain either a library copy or an e-text of one or two literary works chosen from a select list that you will find under the first weeks Lessons. </p><p> Classroom Technology Requirements </p><p> Studying online requires that you use a computer, an internet connection and desktop productivity software to complete your degree. To access the full functionality of our campus and classrooms you are expected to meet or exceed the requirements below. Some programs and classes may require additional software. </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p>Basic Requirements Internet access Email client and an email address Windows XP or higher or Mac OS X Sound card and speakers and a microphone 20 GB of free hard disk space </p><p> Monitor and video card (350MHz or better) capable of </p><p>1024x768 resolution Inkjet or laser jet printer 2 GB of RAM CD-ROM </p><p>Software Requirements The most recent version of Internet Explorer (IE 8) or </p><p>Firefox ( 3.6.x) Microsoft Office 2003 or higher/ </p><p>Open Office / Mac Office 08 Adobe Flash Player 9 or higher Windows Media Player 7 or higher Java 1.5.0 or higher </p><p> QuickTime 7 or higher Adobe Acrobat Reader 8 or higher A current Anti-virus software regularly </p><p>updated according to the software manufacturer. .docx conversion pack </p><p>American Public University System has entered into an agreement with CDWG to provide students and faculty discounted software from Adobe and Microsoft. Click the Help button from inside your classroom for additional information. </p><p>Evaluation Procedures Table of Contents </p><p>There will be reading questions assigned frequently to affirm your knowledge of the course material. You will write one formal essay in the course that will require you to work through a formal process of thinking through your topic, planning, composition, editing, and polishing. Your knowledge of the course materials will also be tested in a final portfolio project. </p><p> Based on a percentage system, your final grade will be calculated as follows: </p><p> Ten Writing Assignments @ 6.5% each 65% One Essay (6-8 pages) 15% Six Discussion Forum Posts @ 1.67% each 10% Final Portfolio Project 10% 100% </p><p>To receive credit for the course, you must pass each of the assignments listed above. </p><p>WRITING ASSIGNMENTS </p><p>Questions for the Writing Assignments can be found in each weekly lesson under the Assignments tab. As you go over the assigned readings, keep these questions in front of you and answer them as you go along. They will highlight key aspects of the subject of study. </p><p> Cut and paste the questions into your own MS Word document. Make sure that your name and the date are at the top of your page, and write all answers in complete sentences. Give thorough responses for full marks and dont </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p>forget to cite the page reference! I should see the question and, then, your response below it. Submit the file for grading by Wednesday or Sunday midnight EST on the due date. </p><p> FORUMS </p><p> You will find prompts on the forums when you click on read full description under each heading. I will read your posts on the board, and you do not need to submit a separate file to me. If you have a question that requires immediate attention, please send me an e-mail rather than posting to the Forums. Thanks! </p><p> Forums are graded out of 100 points. You get 25 points for making an initial post, 25 points for thoughtfully developing your ideas according to the assigned prompt, 25 points for your first reply, and 25 points for your second reply. The questions on the forums are designed to help you generate ideas that you can use in your essay. </p><p> Discussion is very important to the learning process. I would like to see you actively engaging with these literary works and developing your own thoughts in relation to them using the guidelines of linguistic analysis. Forums allow you to respond to your classmates directly, and push you to hone and cultivate your ideas. I generally post replies to each of you, and please take my comments into consideration as you develop an essay topic. Please maintain a professional tone. </p><p> ESSAY </p><p> The essay will give you the opportunity to analyze literary texts from the point of view of a linguist. Focus on the way language is used to write a linguistic analysis 6-8 pages in length. In Week 1, you will choose a novel to analyze; the lessons and the forums will lead you to look at gender differentiation, social variation, and regional variation with reference to your novel, and then your essay will be due on the last day of class. </p><p> FINAL PORTFOLIO PROJECT </p><p> The final portfolio project that you will complete at the end of the course is posted under Assignments, but it wont be open until the last week of the course, and then you will have a full week to work on it. </p><p>Course Outline Table of Contents </p><p>8 Week Course </p><p>Week Topic Heading Learning Objective(s) Reading(s) Assignment(s) </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p>1 Introductions and The Linguistics of Fiction </p><p>1. Look at a piece of fiction for its value to the study of linguistics. 2. Respect the way good authors can reproduce the vagaries of local dialects in order to distinguish their characters as belonging to a particular time and place. 3. Note the way our language has changed in living memory with regards to vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, and pragmatics. 4. Define standard English. </p><p>All readings listed with page numbers or chapter headings are from The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. </p><p> From Modern English pp. 88-91, &amp; </p><p>Post an introduction to the forums (Forum #1), and choose the novel that you will use for your essay. </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal. This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS. </p><p> 5. Discuss the balance between </p><p>internationalism and identity in the spoken language. </p><p>from World English pp. 110-115. </p><p> Our Heroic Roots </p><p>1. Name the nations that invaded Great Britain and formed the basis of Old English. 2. Recognize the Venerable Bede, Caedmon, King Alfred, Beowulf, and their importance to the study of English history. 3. Identify Celtic and Latin borrowings at this early stage in the language. 4. Explain the origins of the runic alphabet. 5. Discuss various aspects of the earliest English literature including topics, genres, and word play (kennings). 6. Familiarize yourself with the different letters in the Old English alphabet. </p><p>Chapter 2 The Origins of English </p><p> Chapter 3 Old English </p><p>Writing Assignment #1 Due Sunday of Week 1 </p><p>2 The Battle of Brunanburh </p><p>1. Discuss the cultural context and identify the various tribes. 2. Explain what is happening during the battle. 3. Identify oral techniques such as kennings and alliteration. </p><p>The Battle of Brunanburh from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle </p><p>Writing Assignment #2 Due Wednesday of Week 2 </p><p> Caedmons Hymn </p><p>1. Assess the importance of Caedmons Hymn within the development of the English language. 2. Discuss the ways in which language shapes meaning, not only through denotation, but also with regards to connotation. 3. Appraise oral elements in the text. </p><p>Caedmons Hymn recorded in Bedes Ecclesiastical History of the English People p. 20 in your textbook about Caedmon, especially Bedes account in the yellow text box p. 29 Caedmons Hymn in the yellow text box p. 164 Synonyms </p><p>Writing Assignment #3 Due Sunday of Week 2 </p><p>3 Middle English 4. Discriminate between Old English and Middle English. 5. Assess the impact of the Norman Conquest on the development of English. 6. Appraise the connotations of words that are rooted in Old English, Old French, or Latin. 7. Identify French borrowings from this period. 8. Analyze the reasons behind spelling variation and standardization. </p><p>Chapter 4 Middle English </p><p> Domesday Book Archives </p><p>Writing Assignment #4 Due Wednesday of Week 3 Forum #2 Initial Ideas for Essay Initial post Due Wednesday of Week 3 </p></li><li><p>STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start...</p></li></ul>

Recommended

View more >