Sakai Tools Designing a User-Centered Sakai Tool Sakai Tools Team Rob Lowden, Daphne Ogle

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  • Sakai ToolsDesigning a User-Centered Sakai Tool Sakai Tools TeamRob Lowden, Daphne Ogle

  • AgendaTools Team UpdateUser-centered design (UCD)Deep Dive IDEO VideoUCD and Sakai ToolsCSS and skinning Sakai

  • Tools Team UpdateTTeamPast 18 monthsNext 6 monthsTo infinity and beyond

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment SupportCSS

  • Why User-Centered Design (UCD)Successful adoption Users choose to use SakaiNO need for "excessive" training and support staffUsableEasy to use / IntuitiveMeet basic user needsDoesnt cause more work

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Suggested UCD ProcessCooper Consulting, www.cooper.comTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • IDEO VideoTweak processMulti-disciplinary teamFail often in order to be successfulFeedback early and oftenWatch users at work in their worldDont be constrained by current systems

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Problem StatementProblemThe problem ofAffectsAffectsImpactThe impact of which isSuccessful SolutionA successful solution would provide (benefit of successful solution)Menlo Innovations, www.menloinstitute.comTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Legacy Tool Refactor Problem StatementProblemMany Sakai legacy tools are unintuitive and not aligned with style guideLimited amount of time & resources available between end of January and Sakai 2.0 release.AffectsAffects faculty, students, staff and researchers in higher educationImpactThe impact of which is that Sakai end users have to spend a lot of effort to use the tools and have an inconsistent mental model of the how Sakai works Successful SolutionA successful solution would provide:Users a consistent interaction model across tools so expectations are met (e.g. how do I navigate, what is a link and whats not, where certain types of actions can be found, etc).Change all legacy tools across system at the same level in given timeTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • ResearchUser ResearchObserve users in the field Interview users and stakeholdersUtilize existing user dataSupport issuesLogsSurveysEtcDesign and usability principles

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • ModelingPersonasPersona MapScenarios / Activity DiagramTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingFramework DefinitionRequirements DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • PersonasTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Persona MapTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Scenarios/Activity DiagramsScenarioSystem use in story formActivity DiagramSame use in diagram formIncludes context of workMore real than task flow TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Requirements DefinitionUse Case DiagramsUse Case MatrixHigh-level requirements docTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework Definition DesignDevelopment Support

  • Use Case DiagramTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Use Case MatrixTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Framework DefinitionInformation architectureNavigation characteristicsUse case detailStyle guideTool interoperabilityTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • DesignTask FlowsSite DiagramsMock-upsTTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • Development SupportFunctional specificationsRelentless communicationUser testing

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

  • ConclusionBig picture understanding of UCDUCD for final core releaseEstablish UCD as best practice for future of SakaiWhat would be helpful for December conference?

    TTeam UpdateUCDIDEOProblem StatementResearchModelingRequirements DefinitionFramework DefinitionDesignDevelopment Support

    I borrowed this user-centered design process diagram from Cooper.com, Alan Coopers software consulting firm. Some of you may have heard of Alan Cooper, hes a recognized guru in software design and usability. Hes written books like The Inmates are Running the Asylum and About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design, also well recognized in the field.Although there are many variations of this process, I think this does a good job of covering the overall idea.Research is spending time with stakeholders and users, interviewing them and watching them do work.Modeling is creating models that describe what youve learned in your research. This is an easy step to skip but is extremely valuable in helping us keep focused in our design. Ill talk more about this in a minute.Requirements definition takes modeling to the next step to decide what the tool needs to provide users at a high level.Framework definition describes the details of the user interaction and system requirementsDesign includes, detailed task flow and mocking up what the tool will beDevelopment support includes communication the system in way that make sense to the development team. At face value this process can seem a little overwhelming. The first 5 phases are prior to any coding.Thats why its important to be flexible and decide what is important for a specific project.A good way to make mistakes faster and move through this process quickly is to time box activities. Most of the time the goal isnt perfection but to be agile and continue to learn more as you move through the process.Youll see IDEO go through a similar process in a 24 hour period in the video well be showing.

    Im going to fairly quickly walk through some activities and possible artifacts produced for each of these steps. Again, each project is different so Im not suggesting this presentation is entirely inclusive nor that each of these activities be completed for every tool but rather my goal is give an overview of some example activities and artifacts that can be used in user centered design and how they might apply to Sakai tool design. Problem statement wasnt outlined in the process slide but wanted to share it with you because of the value it brought to us in the refactor project.This is a basic outline to help think about the problem to be solved.And next Ill show you the problem statement for the refactor project.This isnt the exact statement we used for the project. 2.0 project plan required detail but general idea in less words.

    Read the statement.

    Notice success can be tested when the project is complete. We continued to come back to this statement throughout the project to keep us from getting into scope creep.There were many additional usability changes we would have liked to tackle during this work but it wasnt part of our initial problem.So they became feature requests.Saw a good example of getting out in the field to see how users really do their work in the IDEO video.In our case, not quite as easy as going to a public place where users are in abundance. For us it likely involves scheduling interviews and observations with users. Even in a scheduled observation, the key is not to interrupt users flow. You want them to be as natural as possible to capture how they really do their work. Sit quietly and watch users. Save questions about the work until they are done.

    With interviews dont directly ask users what they do and how they do it since we know they arent good at filling in the details.Ask them questions like what is the most challenging part of your work? What do you like and dislike? Who do you communicate with in your work?

    In addition, at Michigan we have quite a bit of data weve gathered over the past couple of years and continue to gather. Support issues, surveys, user testing data, etc. supplement the more ethnographical research. NO big interaction changes so Observe users in the field users BUT used some of our existing information to inform minor usability enhancements.

    Also used UCD principles like preventing users from making errors. For example, web content required users to set window display size by inputting pixel size in a free text entry box. We changed this to a drop down with a handful of more meaningful choices, although still in pixel size.There are tradeoffs, from a user perspective the solution should be to automatically size the window for the content but given resource constraints we made an incremental improvement.Modeling activities help further understand and communicate what was learned in the research phase. Process of creat