Safe, Respectful, and Culturally Sensitive and Responsive Learning Communities Classroom Management Strategies Part II Fall 2009 New Teacher Development

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Safe, Respectful, and Culturally Sensitive and Responsive Learning Communities Classroom Management Strategies Part II Fall 2009 New Teacher Development Program 1 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Brown Bag Questions 2 </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Outcomes Participants will know how to use Checking My Systems for Equity to self-assess their practice Participants will be able to apply effective classroom management methods that take into consideration issues of equity Participants will be able to apply effective behavior management methods for maintaining a productive learning community 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Agenda Welcome and Overview Checking My Equity Systems A Look at Engaging Practice Behavior Management Role Play: Guided Practice through Demonstration Case Study Team Mind Mapping Closure 4 </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Equity of Voice Active Listening Respect for All Perspectives Safety and Confidentiality Norms for Collaborative Work 5 </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Guiding Principles for Teaching &amp; Learning in a Multicultural Society Culturally responsive educators who are committed to ensuring equity for all students: 1. Continually examine how our life experiences, perspectives, and behaviors regarding culture, language, racial identity, and equity impact our work in teaching and learning. 2. Implement a relevant and challenging curriculum which: Draws upon and affirms the cultural knowledge, life experiences, interests, and competencies of each student. Expands students knowledge of diverse cultural perspectives within their communities and society as a whole. 3. Design and implement equitable opportunities that maximize student learning through full participation, interaction, and empowerment. 4. Explicitly teach in a meaningful context the academic and communication skills, strategies, and conventions that are required for success in advanced learning and the larger society. 5. Understand, value, and build upon the dynamic cultures, knowledge, languages, experiences, and critical issues of families and other members of the schools community. Towards Equity: A Guide for Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Society, McGinty/Mendoza-Reis 1998 6 </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Toward Equity: A Guide for Teaching &amp; Learning in a Multicultural Society Principle One: Teachers who are committed to becoming more culturally responsive and ensuring equity for all students: Continually examine how our life experiences, perspectives, and behaviors regarding culture, language, racial identity, and equity impact our work in teaching and learning. 7 </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Checking My Systems for Equity By Enid Lee I check my systems for equity every time I enter my classroom Teacher reflecting on their practice in an equity workshop What does this teacher actually do to check their systems for equity? Teacher frequently checks the assumptions they make about students and families based on language, culture, race, gender and class; and how those assumptions are shaped by their own language, race, gender, culture and class, among other aspects of their identify, as they prepare, teach, and reflect. Enid Lee Consultants 2003 8 </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Checking My Systems for Equity As you are reading through Checking My Systems for Equity Place a next to questions you consider on a regular basis Place an * next to questions you want to remember to do more of in your classroom Quietly reflect on your next steps, and record these on Checking My Systems for Equity, Planning Next Steps With your elbow partner, share your findings. Discuss additional ideas. 9 </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Checking My Systems for Equity Planning Next Steps I want to remember to What might my next steps be? What are the resources available to me? 10 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Looking At Practice Use Video Note-Taking Guide to collect data. Record only what you see and hear. For example: Comments or language stems by teacher or students Descriptions of actions 11 </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Looking At Practice Analysis of Data What did you see the teacher doing? What did you see the student doing? What did you hear the teacher saying? What did you hear the student saying? What does this teacher actually do to check her systems for equity? 12 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Behavior Management in a Democratic Classroom Clear Messages Consequences Power Struggles Firm Limits 13 </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Clear Message 1. Focus of message on behavior. 2. Be direct and specific. 3. Use your normal tone of voice. 4. Specify the consequences for noncompliance. 5. Support your words with effective action. 14 </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> CONSEQUENCES teach responsibility by holding students accountable for their choices and behavior Setting Limits in the Classroom, R.J. MacKenzie, ED.D Consequences are most effective when they are applied immediately after the unacceptable behavior. Consistent consequences are vital to effective guidance. Logical consequences are effective guidance tool that place focus on behavior, not on child. Effective consequences are proportional to the behavior with a clear and well defined beginning, middle and end. Effective consequences are respectful. Remember the method we use is the method we teach. When the consequence is over, it should really be over! 15 </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> ENDING POWER STRUGGLES Setting Limits in the Classroom, R.J. MacKenzie, ED.D When Students Cross The Line, Hold Firm Ignore Attitude, Not Misbehavior Dont Personalize Misbehavior When Students Argue, Cut It Off Were finished talking about it. If you bring it up again then Discussion time is over. You can do what you were asked, or spend some quiet time by yourself getting ready. What would you like to do? When Students Tune Out, Check In What did I ask you to do? Did you understand what I said When Students Get Hot, Cool Them Down 16 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Characteristics of Firm Limits Setting Limits in the Classroom, R.J. MacKenzie, ED.D Stated in clear, direct, concrete behavioral terms. Words supported by actions. Compliance expected and required. Provide information needed to make acceptable choices and cooperate. Provide accountability. 17 </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Reflection One What do I need to do more of? What do I need to do less of? 18 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Turn and Talk 19 </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Guided Practice Through Demonstrations In your group: 1. Read your scenario. 2. Discuss possible preventions that could have helped avoid the situation. 3. Consider possible interventions. 4. Create a 2-3 minute enactment demonstrating prevention and/or intervention strategies. 20 </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Break 10 minutes 21 </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Case Study Issue related to your case study student. What is the context? What is the problem? What are some solutions? 22 </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Preparing for Team Mind Mapping Break into small groups of 3 to 4 people Each person should use a different color marker from others in the group Summarize your case study challenge in the center of the Team Mind Map Entitle each spoke as follows: Preventions Resources Interventions People 23 </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Team Mind Mapping Case Study Challenge PreventionsPeopleInterventionsResources 24 </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> Team Mind Mapping Protocol / Explanation 2 minutes First person summarizes their issue as group listens quietly without asking questions Clarification 2 minutes Group members ask clarifying questions only Team Webbing 6 minutes Working simultaneously, group members record ideas onto presenters Mind Map. More category spokes may be added. Move around (or turn around) the map to get a fresh perspective When there are no other responses, sign your name on the mind map with your color marker. Repeat - next team member presents 25 </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> While Brainstorming Consider Preventions and interventions (resource packet) Communication with parents School and community resources Student history and cumulative files Peer and mentor support Personal reflections? Personal well being? Time of day? 26 </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> Reflection Two What insights have you gained tonight related to your identified issue? What will be your next steps? How might your New Teacher Developer or another school colleague assist you? 27 </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Brown Bag Questions 28 </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Seminar Summary What we learned How to use Checking My Systems for Equity to self- assess their practice Applied effective classroom management methods that took into consideration issues of equity Applied effective behavior management methods for maintaining a productive learning community. How we learned it Self-Assessed Video Observation Writing Reflections Role Play/Guided Practice Turn And Talk Team Mind Maps 29 </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Treat people as if they were what they should be, and you help them become what they are capable of becoming. - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 30 </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Post-It Feedback What Worked? What didnt?Questions? 31 </li> </ul>