Ruth Risdon Storer Garden– Valley- A formal white flower garden was ... from India is a popular moon garden flower because of its ... The secret to a healthy garden is

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<ul><li><p>Ruth Risdon StorerGarden </p><p>Garden</p><p>Valley-A</p><p>Wise </p><p>Ellen Zagory</p><p>Sign made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p></li><li><p>How do Iselect mulch?</p><p>How often should I mulch?</p><p>How much mulch do I need?</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p><p>Mulch protects the soil and improves the appearance of the home garden.</p><p>Mulch reducesweeds by blocking sunlight</p><p>that weed seeds need to grow</p><p>water needs by protecting soilfrom losing water to evaporationand run-off</p><p> fertilizer needs by breakingdown and adding its ownnutrients to the soil</p><p> soil compaction by cushioningthe soil below</p><p>Mulch improvesappearance by covering bare</p><p>ground and reducing weeds</p><p>drainage over time by breakingdown and improving soilstructure</p><p>soil health by adding nutrientsto the soil as it breaks down</p><p>plant health by improving soiland growing conditions</p><p>Car</p><p>mia</p><p> Fel</p><p>dman</p><p>What is mulch?Mulch is a protective covering</p><p>spread on the ground aroundplants. It improves the health ofyour garden. </p><p>The Arboretum uses medium,shredded fir bark mulch becauseit is attractive, durable and natural-looking. Notice thismulch around you in the Valley-Wise Garden. </p><p>Bets</p><p>y Fa</p><p>ber</p><p>Arboretum volunteers mulching</p><p>Mulched home garden</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p></li><li><p>Mulch protects the soil and improves the appearance of the home garden.</p><p>Car</p><p>mia</p><p> Fel</p><p>dman</p><p>How do I select mulch?Choose: fine or medium-sized mulch</p><p> pieces less than 2 long</p><p>Popular kinds of mulches include: Shredded bark or wood</p><p> Nut shells</p><p> Pine needles or other tree leaves</p><p>How much mulch do I need?Small plants2 deep</p><p>Large plants, trees4 deep</p><p>Pathways and bare ground4 deep</p><p>If you spread mulch too thinly, you lose its benefits.</p><p>How often should I mulch?Apply mulch at least once a year or as needed tomaintain an optimum depth of 2-4. </p><p>Mulched home garden</p><p>Mulch reducesweeds by blocking sunlight</p><p>that weed seeds need to grow</p><p>water needs by protecting soilfrom losing water to evaporationand run-off</p><p> fertilizer needs by breakingdown and adding its ownnutrients to the soil</p><p> soil compaction by cushioningthe soil below</p><p>Mulch improvesappearance by covering bare</p><p>ground and reducing weeds</p><p>drainage over time by breakingdown and improving soilstructure</p><p>soil health by adding nutrientsto the soil as it breaks down</p><p>plant health by improving soiland growing conditions</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p><p>What is mulch?Mulch is a protective covering</p><p>spread on the ground aroundplants. It improves the health ofyour garden. </p><p>The Arboretum uses medium,shredded fir bark mulch becauseit is attractive, durable and natural-looking. Notice thismulch around you in the Valley-Wise Garden. </p><p>Bets</p><p>y Fa</p><p>ber</p><p>Arboretum volunteers mulching</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Mulch_9x6_inside 4/20/07 1:56 PM Page 1</p></li><li><p>Who was Ruth Risdon Storer?Dr. Ruth Risdon Storer was Yolo</p><p>Countys first pediatrician and an avid gardener. She shared many of the plantshere with the Arboretum and helped tofund this garden. First planted in 1980, thisdemonstration garden was inspired byStorers own home garden. Like her garden,it has year-round color, beauty and requireslittle maintenance. </p><p>Arboretum staff test new plants here for use in Valley-Wise gardens. Explore this garden </p><p>for Arboretum All-Starsour top recommended plants. </p><p>WELCOME TO THERuth Risdon StorerGardenA Valley-WiseGarden</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer</p><p>How can I save money?</p><p>How can I live in a more beautiful, </p><p>healthy environment?</p><p>How can I have more free time?</p><p>Ellen Zagory Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Dr. RuthsPrescription for Valley-Wise Gardening</p><p>Name</p><p>Date</p><p>Address</p><p>Diagnosis</p><p>RefillLabelDispense as Written</p><p>R</p><p>Home Gardeners</p><p>Anytime</p><p>Central Valley of California</p><p>Hot, dry summers; cold, wet winters; and heavy soils</p><p>Visit the Valley-Wise Garden year-round to see seasonal beauty</p><p>Learn to use Valley-Wise gardening practicesTransform your home garden into a Valley-Wise landscape</p><p>XX</p><p>SeasonallyValley-Wise Garden</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUMValley-Wise gardening uses plants and practices suited to Central Valley conditions</p><p>Bob </p><p>Mar</p><p>kson</p></li><li><p>Ellen Zagory Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Dr. RuthsPrescription for Valley-Wise Gardening</p><p>Name</p><p>Date</p><p>Address</p><p>Diagnosis</p><p>RefillLabelDispense as Written</p><p>R</p><p>Home Gardeners</p><p>Anytime</p><p>Central Valley of California</p><p>Hot, dry summers; cold, wet winters; and heavy soils</p><p>Visit the Valley-Wise Garden year-round to see seasonal beauty</p><p>Learn to use Valley-Wise gardening practicesTransform your home garden into a Valley-Wise landscape</p><p>XX</p><p>SeasonallyValley-Wise Garden</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Valley-Wise Gardeners choose low-water-use plants and</p><p>have lower water bills</p><p> spend less on chemical fertilizersand pesticides</p><p> use long-lived plants that dontneed regular replacement</p><p>Valley-Wise Gardeners provide food and shelter for </p><p>butterflies and birds to create a healthier ecosystem</p><p> conserve valuable water resources</p><p> cause less chemical pollution</p><p> have colorful gardens that buzzwith life</p><p>Valley-Wise Gardeners spend less time on garden</p><p>maintenance</p><p> spend less time replacingplants</p><p> have less lawn to mow</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Who was Ruth Risdon Storer?Dr. Ruth Risdon Storer was Yolo</p><p>Countys first pediatrician and an avid gardener. She shared many of the plantshere with the Arboretum and helped tofund this garden. First planted in 1980, thisdemonstration garden was inspired byStorers own home garden. Like her garden,it has year-round color, beauty and requireslittle maintenance. </p><p>Arboretum staff test new plants here for use in Valley-Wise gardens. Explore this garden </p><p>for Arboretum All-Starsour top recommended plants. </p><p>WELCOME TO THERuth Risdon StorerGardenA Valley-WiseGarden</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUMValley-Wise gardening uses plants and practices suited to Central Valley conditions</p><p>Bob </p><p>Mar</p><p>kson</p><p>AskDrRuth_9x6inside 4/20/07 1:40 PM Page 1</p></li><li><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>ARE APHIDS</p><p>By growing buddy, orcompanion, plants aroundyour roses, you can attractbeneficial insects that eataphids and other pests. . .without using chemicals!</p><p>Instead of using pesticides, try the buddy system.</p><p>Without Buddy Plants With Buddy Plants</p><p>We eat aphids!Buddy, or companion, plantsprovide food and/or shelterto adult beneficial insects,encouraging them to laytheir eggs near roses.Hungry larvae then hatchand help control aphids andother pests by eating them.</p><p>LacewingLarva eats aphids andsmall caterpillars.</p><p>Adult eats nectarand pollen.</p><p>Ladybird BeetleLarva eats aphids, scalesand mites.</p><p>Adult eats aphids,scales and mites.</p><p>Larva eats aphids, thripsand mites.</p><p>Adult eats nectarand pollen.</p><p>Syrphid Fly</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>Rose bush without buddy plants</p><p>Rose bush with buddy plants</p><p>Aphid-infested rose Healthy, aphid-free rose</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p></li><li><p>AM I</p><p>No. I am a low-maintenance rose because I am disease resistant.</p><p>When you buy roses, look onthe label to see if theyre diseaseresistant. This will save youtime, money and effort in yourValley-Wise garden. Notice the Class Act rose in front of you.It is resistant to common fungal diseases</p><p>and thrives in the Valley-Wise Gardenwithout the use of pesticides. </p><p>High Maintenance Roses without disease resistance are</p><p>prone to unsightly fungal diseases In order to look their best, these roses</p><p>may require high levels of care and fungicide applications</p><p>Common Fungal Problems in Roses</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p><p>Low Maintenance Roses with disease resistance are easier to</p><p>care for because they are less likely to getfungal diseases</p><p> These roses are beautiful without needingfungicide</p><p>Choose Low-Maintenance Roses</p><p>Rust Black spot Powdery mildew Rosa Perle dOr Rosa x odoratus Mutabilis Rosa Gruss an AachenArboretum All-Star ratS-llA muterobrAratS-llA muterobrA</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p> 2</p><p>007</p><p>Dili</p><p>p Ba</p><p>rman</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Laur</p><p>en K</p><p>ane</p><p>Ellen Zagory</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation </p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p></li><li><p>Who was Carolee Shields?Carolee Shields was the wife of Judge Peter</p><p>J. Shields, an early champion of the founding ofUC Davis. She is credited with starting thelong-standing campus tradition of Picnic Dayby hosting the first event in 1909.</p><p>After Judge Shields passed away, Mrs.Shields made sure that a bequest from theirestate would create the Shields Oak Grovealong with this garden and gazebo. </p><p>The formal white flower garden wasplanted in 1976 at the suggestion of Mrs.Shields friends, Ruth Risdon Storer andAlyce Jewett.</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUM</p><p>WELCOME TO THECarolee ShieldsWhite Flower Gardenand Gazebo</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>In the evening, many of the flowers in this garden havea stronger scent that attracts night-pollinating moths.</p><p>Historically, white flower gardens were used by aristocrats of ancient India,and later by English socialites, for outdoor parties before air conditioningwas invented. In order to escape summer heat, parties were held in theevening. White flowers were ideal because they shine in the light of themoon.</p><p>It provides a wonderful destination forArboretum visitors</p><p>It provides food sources for night-pollinating insects</p><p>This garden and gazebo are a beautiful setting for weddings and receptions.For reservations, call Campus Events and Visitor Services (530) 752-2675.</p><p>WHY IS THERE A</p><p>IN THE ARBORETUM</p><p>Carolee Shields (far left), seated behind Judge Shields, hostsone of the first Picnic Day events in the area that eventuallybecame the Arboretum. </p><p>White garland ginger(Hedychium coronarium)from India is a popular moongarden flower because of itstropical fragrance.</p><p>The sphinx moth is attracted to white flowers bytheir sweet fragrance and visibility at night. As themoth feeds on nectar, it pollinates the flowers.Smerinthus cerisyi (left), and Hyles lineata (right), bothin the Sphingidae family.</p><p>Any white-flowering plant issuitable for a moon garden.Some of these scented favoritesare found in this garden.</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>Clockwise from top: summerdaphne (Daphne x transcaucasica),southern magnolia (Magnoliagrandiflora), Argentine rain lily(Zephyranthes candida), and callalily (Zantedeschia aethiopica).</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>Lind</p><p>ey F</p><p>amily</p><p> Col</p><p>lect</p><p>ion,</p><p> UC</p><p> Dav</p><p>is</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>elIt continues a three thousand year-oldgardening tradition</p></li><li><p>Elle</p><p>n Z</p><p>ago</p><p>ry</p><p>The Valley-Wise Garden is watered only once every two weeks for seven months of the year (April-October). Winter rains take care of the rest.</p><p>Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Water during the cool morning hours toreduce water loss through evaporation. </p><p>NO. The secret to a healthy garden iswatering deeply and infrequently. Deep watering means wetting a plants entire root zone.</p><p>Constantly wet soils can kill many plants, so allow soil to dry before you water again.</p><p>It is best to water deeply and infrequently. Deep watering means</p><p>wetting a plants entire root zone. The drought-tolerant plants in the Valley-Wise Garden get</p><p>deep watering once every two weeks The water loving plants in the nearby White Flower Garden</p><p>and Gazebo get deep watering once a week</p><p> Learning to use your irrigation controller Turning off your watering system during the </p><p>rainy winter season Adjusting irrigation heads to avoid watering </p><p>sidewalks and pathways Using water-efficient spray heads that release </p><p>less water over time Using mulch to reduce water loss</p><p>New plantings need more water untiltheir roots have started to grow into thesurrounding soil. Plant in the fall and let</p><p>the winter rains water for you. </p><p>Your plants need enough waterto wet their entire root zone. </p><p>Lawn Perennials and shrubs Trees</p><p>Even drought-tolerant plants may need daily water if you plant in the spring or summer. </p><p>20</p><p>3</p><p>412-18 24+</p><p>Scale: 3/16=1</p><p>Plants need the most water during thelong, hot days of summer. Turn yoursprinklers OFF in the winter; rains </p><p>provide plenty of water.</p><p>Check how deep the water is getting into soilby using a shovel to gently expose the soilwithout disturbing plants. </p><p>6Typical root zone depths</p><p>Make your irrigation system more water-wise by:</p><p>Did you know? Most California gardens are given 40%</p><p>more water than they need</p><p> Too much watering is the major cause of plant death in many home gardens </p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p></li><li><p>Elle</p><p>n Z</p><p>ago</p><p>ry</p><p>How much water do my plants need?</p><p>How much should I water in different </p><p>seasons?</p><p>How much should I water my </p><p>new plantings?</p><p>How often should Iwater my plants?</p><p>How can I make my irrigation system more</p><p>water-wise?</p><p>The Valley-Wise Garden is watered only once every two weeks for seven months of the year (April-October). Winter rains take care of the rest.</p><p>Do I need to water everyday?</p><p>What time of day is best for watering?</p><p>Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Did you know? Most California gardens are given 40%</p><p>more water than they need</p><p> Too much watering is the major cause of plant death in many home gardens </p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by grants from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation and the UC Davis Office of Administration</p><p>Ruth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p></li><li><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUMRuth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>Wayne Roderick seaside daisyErigeron Wayne Roderick</p><p>We eat aphids!M</p><p>elis</p><p>sa B</p><p>orel</p><p>Buddy, or companion, plants like seaside daisyand goldenrod attract adult beneficial insects,adding beauty and function to your garden.</p><p>Syrphid fly adults feedon the nectar and pollenof companion plants.Growing these plants ina location close to rosesencourages beneficialinsects to lay their eggsnearby. Larvae thenhatch and can feed onaphids and other rosepest insects.</p><p>California goldenrodSolidago californica</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation</p><p>PROVIDE BENEFICIAL INSECTS</p><p>FOR</p><p>Mel</p><p>issa</p><p> Bor</p><p>el</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p></li><li><p>We eat aphids!</p><p>PROVIDE BENEFICIAL INSECTS</p><p>FOR</p><p>Buddy, or companion, plants like deergrassand yarrow provide shelter for beneficialladybird beetles.</p><p>Ladybird beetles staysafe by taking cover inthese companion plants.Growing these plants ina location close to rosesprovides the beneficialinsects with theirfavorite foods: rose pestssuch as aphids, scales,mites, and caterpillars.</p><p>Emily</p><p> Gri</p><p>swol</p><p>d</p><p>Elle</p><p>n Za</p><p>gory</p><p>UC</p><p> IPM</p><p>UCDAVIS</p><p>RBORETUMRuth Risdon Storer GardenA Valley-Wise Garden</p><p>arboretum.ucdavis.eduSign made possible by a grant from the Elvenia J. Slosson Foundation</p><p>Mexican DeergrassMuhlenbergia dubia</p><p>Common Yarrow and its hybridsAchillea Creamy</p></li></ul>