Click here to load reader

Roger Greenaway - What do Facilitators do

  • View
    221

  • Download
    3

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Roger Greenaway - What do Facilitators do

Text of Roger Greenaway - What do Facilitators do

  • What Do Facilitators Do?

    Dr. Roger Greenaway Dr. Roger Greenaway trains facilitators, educators, trainers and consultants to bring out the full benefits of active and experiential learning. He works with training organisations, training departments and educational institutions - worldwide. His Train-the-Trainer workshop was widely successful in Shenzhen in 2011 and he will be presenting another TTT in Shanghai in May of 2013.

    Copyright Sino Associates & Roger Greenaway 2012-2022. All Rights Reserved.

  • 2How do you do facilitation? is a bit of a conversation stopper. Ask this to a facilitator and I guarantee that you will get hesitation and evasiveness.

    I (too) have spent many years being evasive on this point and for a very good reason: which is that I like to be learner-centred and pay attention to what the learner is doing (rather than being facilitator-centred).

    In the Tao of Leadership, John Heider admires the kind of group leadership, which might result in the group saying We did it ourselves. Such a leader is working in such subtle ways that the group does not notice what the leader is doing (if anything).

    So how can you model yourself on a style of leadership in which the leader is almost entirely invisible?

    I hope the article below brings some useful clarity to what facilitators do without destroying the spontaneity, flexibility, and ever-changing nature of what it is like to facilitate learning in groups.

    REVIEWING THE SITUATION

    What it is best to do as a facilitator

    So how can you model yourself on a style of leadership in which the leader is almost entirely invisible?

  • 3depends very much on the situation. Being tuned in to the situation will help you make good choices about what to do. And the more you review in ways that encourage people to express themselves, the more you will be in tune with the situation. So it is very useful (and

    rewarding) if you can get this virtuous cycle going in which everyone, including yourself, gets tuned in to what people are experiencing.

    7 SITUATIONS YOU CAN ANTICIPATE (You can plan for these)

    Some situations are quite predictable and

    can be anticipated. For example:

    1. You can anticipate the priorities for what you need to do at the beginning, middle and end of a programme - which is why I advocate designing reviews into a programme before you put the activities in place

    2. You can anticipate how certain activities

    will generate particular kinds of incidents,

    experiences and issues

    3. You can anticipate how you might need

    to facilitate a different kind of review following an experience of success or failure

    7

    . :

    1

    2

    3

    4

  • 44. You can anticipate how you can best facilitate a loud group, a quiet group, a

    group with a mix of loud and quiet people

    5. You can anticipate how you can best facilitate a review when time is short and when there is more time available

    6. And the group size will determine which kinds of facilitation strategy will work best

    7. The current situation may lend itself to

    working with particular learning objectives

    - whether from the general programme objectives or arising from individual needs

    or goals

    So, before deciding what you are going to do as a facilitator you may want to consider the above 7 points. Here they are again presented as questions:

    1. What stage of the programme is it?2. What reviewing opportunities will the activity provide?

    3. What is the mood of the group?4. How can I engage all participants (quiet

    or loud)?5. How much time is available?

    6. What works best with this size of group?7. What opportunities are there for

    5

    6

    7

    7

    1.

    2.

    3.

    4.

    5

    6.

    7.

  • 5working on key objectives?

    And when you have thought this through and have come up with Plan A you will be well advised to have a Plan B (because things change and facilitation is

    mostly a responsive role). And a Plan Z will be handy too: an emergency plan that will work in almost any situation.

    3 SITUATIONS THAT ARE DIFFICULT TO ANTICIPATE

    (You can even plan for these too!)

    1. YOU ARE IN THE DARK

    You know very little about the event you are about to review. You are reviewing an event at which you were not present. (You may have less information than usual, but

    you can still prepare a review for these situations.)

    2. THE UNEXPECTED

    Un ex p ected events o f ten captu re peoples interest and can become a more significant source of learning than the events you had planned or predicted. (You need to judge whether the surprise is a

    distraction or a welcome opportunity for learning.)

    A B Z

    3

    1.

    Unexpected events often capture people's interest and can become a more significant source of learning than the events you had planned or predicted

  • 63. YOU ARE STUCK

    All your options seem to run out. Or none

    of your options feel right. Or it feels like a

    brand new situation that you have never encountered before. You want to dial the facilitation hot line (or try strategy 5 described below).

    6 WAYS OF FACILITATING ACTIVE LEARNING

    1. BE A ROLE MODEL

    Remember that groups will tend to copy how you behave. So think about what you want learners to do and set a good example of what it is like to be an active learner. Some examples:

    If you are asking participants to set

    learning goals, you can declare your own learning goals.

    You can join in active reviewing exercises

    as a part ic ipant ( tast ing your own medicine may not always be a good move, but it often is).

    Try to use demonstration rather than

    a pure verbal briefing. For example, with

    Action Replay you can demonstrate how to use the remote control and conduct

    2.

    3.

    5

    6

    1.

  • 7interviews before handing over the remote and the microphone.

    Watch out. While joining in as a learner

    can be an influential facilitation strategy, it can be too influential if there are not also times when you let go, step back and

    leave space for others.

    2. DESCRIBE YOUR CHANGING ROLE

    The more different kinds of facilitation roles you take on (joining in, standing

    back, helping, not helping) the more confusing it can be for learners. The answer is not to cramp your style and limit yourself to one role. Quite the opposite: whenever it seems necessary, explain what your preferred role will be in the next learning process - and why. (This point is expanded later in The Role of the Facilitator where I summarize John Herons model)

    The more successful you are in helping groups grow and develop, the more you will want to adjust your role and

    relationship to best serve the group and their learning objectives. Spell out how

    your role can change at different stages of group development and at different stages of learning new skills.

    2.

    Joining in as a learner can be an influential facilitation strategy, (but) it can be too influential if there are not also times when you let go

  • 83. LEAVE SPACE FOR LEARNING : Dont be

    a space invader!)

    What is NOT facilitative:

    Stepping into a problem-solving exercise with the solution.

    Being the main source of wisdom rather than letting participants look to their own source of wisdom their experiences.

    Filling in the silence while people are

    thinking about the question you have just

    asked.

    Asking all the questions and not

    drawing out questions from learners.

    Telling participants what they should have done and should have learned.

    Generally being too busy, too helpful and too interfering.

    Tell the teacher inside you to take a rest when you want participants to learn by reflecting on their experiences.

    4. SHARE OUT OPPORTUNITIES AND INVOLVE EVERYONE

    Although a discussion circle looks very democratic, a closer look usually finds that the discussion is being dominated by

    John Heron

    3

  • 9a few: it is effectively becomes theatre in

    the round with a few people performing while the rest spectate. Of course you can try making it more participative by persuading spectators to get up on

    stage, but it is smarter (and more effective) to f ind stages on which everyone is happy to perform. See Turn taking in Group Reviews for better ways

    of sharing out opportunities and involving

    everyone.

    5. USE TRANSPARENT FACILITATION

    If you face a facilitation problem and you

    feel a bit stuck and are wondering what will be the best course of action ... you are

    not alone. For a start there are probably

    different voices in your head - and you can

    choose to tell the group about (some of) these voices.

    And if you have no voices in your head, you can tell the group about that too. And there are the voices of the participants too. You are not throwing yourself at the mercy of the group. You are using a very deliberate strategy of presenting a problem to the group (a problem that might affect them more than it does you).

    And you are consulting with them about the best course of action. You are inviting

    4

    If you face a facilitation problem and you feel a bit stuck and are wondering what will be the best course of action ...you are not alone

    5

  • 10

    them to be your facilitation advisory committee...

    Mmmm - perhaps that one is a step too far, but I think you can see that such a st rategy i s very cons istent w

Search related