of 14/14
COMBINING The Summit Herald, Summit Kucord, Summit Press and Summit News-Guide Subscription $2.00 a Year Telephone Summit G-1000 Mailed in conformity with P. 0. D. Order No. 19087, rlERALD \ OFFICIAL Official Newspaper of City ami County. Published Thursday A. M. by The Summit Publishing Co., 357 Springfield Avenue. Entered at tho Post Office, Summit, N. J., as 2nd Class Matter. 54th Year. No. 34 FRED L. PALMER, Editor & Publisher THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1943 J. EDWIN CARTER, Business Mgr. & Publisher 5 CENTS Red Cross Now Knows It Must Raise Nearly $52,000 Here The Summit Red Cross now knows it has the job of raisins nearly $52,000 this year. (The exact amount is $51,900). This figure compares with a little more than $38,000 raised, last year through the war fund drive ($28,837) and the annual roll call about two months previously ($9,278). The amount must be raised in Summit, New Providence Borough, New Providence Township,, Passaic Township and part of Millington. G. H. Brewer, who was chairman of last year's War Fund Drive, has agreed to take the same job this year. "We will follow the organization plan and pattern which was suc- cessful last year," Mr. Brewer said, "and expect to have the organization completed shortly. We will raUe money by direct solicitation and by various types .of functions—bridge luncheons and teas and similar events. We know that the job is a big one but the need has become very much greater and wo do not doubt we will have the full support of all the communities whose help wo will ask." The drive begins formally throughout the United States on REGISTER YOUR DOG owners are glvm ten duys to purchase a license mid official registration tu# for pets. !)«(? regrlstrfttton started <w January 1 and should him' been completed on the 30th. Summit residents, however, did not se«ni to realize this fact, mid beginning Feb. 1, the Summit Foilcc storied a house to house canvass to check on the nuuiher of unli- censed ptts in the elty. The penalty for not registering a dog runs from $5 to $50. Many Want To Hear War Prisoners'Aid Committee Head Here 1 ! February 28 which has been named Red Cross Sunday. Summit Blood Donors Contribute 43 Pints Above Set Quota Summit citizens responded so en T thusiastically to the Red Cross ap- ,peal for Blood Donors that 13 pints aljovo tho'fluflta we.ni-..^QnUlbuted here Tuesday and Wednesday when the Hod Cross Mobile Unit was at tho Y.M.C.A. A total of 343 pints were .given! 172 Tuesday and 171 Wednesday. This was done despite the fact that Monday morning the daily quota for Summit was raised from 140 to 150 pints and 225 donors in- stead of 200 had to ibe signed up each day. "We are deeply grateful," said Garloton Pierson, chairman of the Blood Bank Committee of the local Hed Cross chapter, "to all who of- fered to donate their blood and who helped us make so fine a showing." Victory Book Drive Is Lagging; Your Help Urgently Needed The 1943 Victory Book Campaign tor taoii and women In service, which is being conducted in Sum- mit as part of the campaign of a National Committee, is lagging-ac- cording to a spokesman for the Summit unit of the American Wom- en's Voluntary Services who are designated as the local collection agency. Somo books that are being con- tributed here are unsuitable in character and in their,physical con- dition. The kind of book that kills dull hours on a long trip is the kind of book men and women in service Heck, the A.W.V.S. points out. Read- ing matter sought Includes current best sollers, mystery and adventure stories. If you have books and are un- able to deliver to oue of the fol- lowing depositories: Public Libra- ry, D., h. '& W. Station, Paulson's Travel Bureau, Murphy's Music Store and the British War Reliet workrooms, you are asked to tele- phono Corby's Enterprise Laundry. Inc., Summit 6-1000 and one of the laundry trucks will call for the books and deposit them, The&jVar Department has an- nounceaHhat overseas mailing reg- ulations do not apply to books donated to, the campaign. Two slogans'apropos tue Victory Campaign that have received some attention are these: "Praise the Lord and Pass the New. Edition" and "Best Seller for*Roal Sellefs." The Y. M. C. A. reports that res- ervations are being received earlier than usual for the annual dinner Monday night, February 8 and it is now expected that between 150 and 200 will attend to hear Tracy Strong, director of Y. M. C. A. War Prisoners' Aid in all belligerent countries. He.will talk on "YMCA Work Witii Prisoners of War." In view of the widespread public interest in this subject the associ- ation has again called attention to the fact that anyone interested in. the work of the ''Y" may attend the annual meeting and dinner by call- the Y. M. C. A. office and expressing a wish to do so. (Dinner -will be served at C:4B so that commuters may go direct to the Y, M. C. A, The charge is $1.15.) Dinner will be served by the "William Pitt Tavern from the "Y" kitchen. ' "Tracy Strong Is responsible for keeping up the spirits of more than 4,000,000 prisoners, both Allied and Axis in .-"fiixteen countries," Y/MCA officials "said. "His job gives him •the right theoretically to enter Ger- many or Japan or any other nation at war with the United States. So •tor -lie-haso*! -taken advantage of the opportunity but he may do so soon, Strong's men visit thousands of prison camps, talk to the .men, distribute musical instruments, garden tools and the like, plan ath- letic and theatricalprogranis,rec- reation and study. Neutral agents are usually used. The German Y. M. C. A, man is a Dane." The program will also include a brief skit by the Hi-Y which will indicate the purpose of Y. M. C. A,| work. The president, Alfred W,' Alesbury, will make his report. Di- rectors will be elected and after the meeting will choose directors. The slate of new directors (normally seven are chosen each year for a three-year term but this year there are eight because of the resigna- tion of Douglas Hardy for war ser- vice) is as follows: Ernest P. Pat- ten, who has been nominated for a. third term; Kriicst F. Loathom, who is filling, tm unexpireii term; Rome Betts and Reed \V. Hyde, both of whom have previously been direc- tors; W. W. Codke, John B. Dou- gall, Fred' L. Palmer aud Robert Peterson, none of whom havo boon directors before. H. S. Basketball Team Says Millkrn Boys- Were Misrepresented Andrew Genualdi, captain of Summit High School's basketball team and William Clarke, manager, have written a letter about a re- port in the January 14 Herald of a Millburn-Summlt High Schools basketball game at Millburn: The letter follows: "In-the Summit Herald of Thurs- day, January 14. 1943 on page 14 appeared the following paragraph: ". 'As the varsity game ended, the Millburn quintet greeted the Sum- mit boys in the dressing room with the remark: "Guess you fellows' un- eratand now we don't like you uys, no how.' ''To the knowledge, of the mem- bers of the Summit High School basketball team, no such statement was made by the Millburn players. We believe, therefore, in justice to all concerned, that this statement should be definitely retracted and are asking you to publish this letter. "For a long time both schools have enjoyed neighborly sports rivalry and we on our part hope to continue this relationship with Millburn High School on the same basis of keen competition and good sportsmanship." SUMMIT MANTELLS OF 39=DAY LIFEBOAT EXPERIENCES AT SEA The Herald Editor of telephoned The Mr. Summit Barthol- omew because the above letter was on the school. letterhead He asked of the high whether the signers had proposed the letter or whether Mr. Bartholomew had re- quested it. He was told the boys had gone to their coach. He asked whether the letter had been dic- tated or whether the boys had com- posed it. He was told the boys composed it. Ho asked whether the boys had been called in and asked to sign the letter. Mr, Bartholomew wanted to know what difference it made whether the boys suggested the, letter or notT" The "Editor'stiu'he wanted to judge whether the boys might have signed, the letter thinking that it would be unwise for them not to do so. Mr. Bartholdmew then said; "Don't publish' the letter if you don't want to/.\and hiing up in the midst of the conversation. FIREMEN'S FLAME A few tickets, all reserved, ure still available tor the "Firemen's Flame," the annuul High School €r. 0. Show, to be presented tomorrow night at 8:15 In the High School audi- torium. Tickets may be pur- chased by calling the Blgrh School office, Sn. 6-2213. Ready To Hold Practice Test Of Defense Units "Plans for the Feb. 7 test of the Red Cross disaster groups, police reserve, messengers, ambulance aud emergency food and housing corps of the Summit defense units are rapidly taking final form and an excellent turn-out of 'refugees' (junior and senior high school pu- n-ils) is confidently expected," de- clares Director Maxwell Lester, Jr. of this city's OCD office. Parents of "refugees" are urged not to make plans that will conflict with participation by the boya and girls in this community service. Traffic will not be halted and. war-! dens and others not specifically listed above are not to be called out. Would Confer With City On Enacting Curfew Law In letter received' night, Common Counoll, Tuesday was in- formed by the Council of Social Agencles-Defeiise Service Council, it 'would gladly confer with the city •government in formulating a cur- few tor Summit youogsteiM under 14. "IN A CLASS BY ITSELF" . . . Exclusive: Famous Fox Scientific care of the hair; Ferftwood Perma- nents; Nina Facials; Nina Cos- metics. Fernwood Hairdressers, 116 Summit avenue. adv. Studies Ways To Save $100,000 In City Budget Summit Taxpayers' Association at a meeting;, Monday night, post- poned from last Thursday because of the storm, listened to proposals from its president, Howard D. Mc- Oeorgc, on means of city retrench- ment in this year's city pudget, which he estimated would save the city upwards of $1QO,000 in appro- priations. All of Mr. McGeorge's propdsals were submitted for com- mittee study. They included the following: 1, The possibility of merging the office of the city treasurer and the receiver of taxes resulting in a saving of the number of personnel required; 2. Elimination of the of- fice of building inspector, inas- much as little or;tio building will be done during; the war; 3. The cleaning of paper off the streets, which now costs the city $5,000 an- nually, by the business men in front of their own establishments; 4. The city carry its own insurance and thus-get the. benefit between the spread of tho Cost-of the in- surance to the underwriter and to the.insured; .5. Save a .large amount of the salaries pajd, the city soli- citor and the city, clerk, money paid out for talent -which Mr. McGeorge claims the city is not now getting hi the clerk's office for he hires other clerks 'to dp the work; G. Savings In the police department after study has been made of the present assignment of the 'person- nel; 7. Like action in the fire de- partment; ; 8. Give relief to real es- tate by placing more taxes, on per- sonal property; ft. Buy electricity wholesale from Jersey Central Power and Light Co. and sell It at retail);-.and eliminate the office of city physician, and turn his duties over ;to the Board of Health physician. THIS IS THE WAY HE AM) HIS COMPANIONS APPEARED AT EM) OF .TOUItXKY His merchant ship 'torpedoed and sunk .... all hands listed as "missing siiul presumed lost" .... *I» days in a Hfehont, bobbing over 1,B()I) miles of 1he Atlantic .... finally land—and then home. That's tho newest experience.of Lt, Com, Sealiury Cook, of 10 Foruwood mad, 47-year-«l<l veteran of the sea (seated at the reader's right). He was ]>«iisl<iii«d lij tli<> Nnvy In liWil after 2« years of service and then took a civilian war job, tried to-get Imek In the Navy iviihmil success mid then enlisted In tho Merchant Mnrlne. He sailed as second mate lust Noveniliur on the mrtro vessel which was sunk. He said that after they left the sinking vessel tliey lind no comiiass, sextant, chart, or,oven a wutch, but "there were plenty of stars to steer'by. T.he'Wff aOO-poimdcrs in the crew lost a tot of weight, and 1 dropped 25 pounds to 12.*). Hut the big fellows tell it most." OUR TOWN J Survives Torpedoing 39 Days In Lifeboat; C. D. of A. Meets Cour.t Benedict No. 611, Catholic daughters ot America, will hold the regular business meeting on Tues- day evening, February 9» at 8:30 p. m. in the club rooms at St. Teresa's School, Morris avenue. BUTTONHOLES, B U f T O N S," hemstitching. Poyle'a Sewing Ma- chine Store, 480 sprin&tleld Ave. —adv,-tf SOME MORE MATTERS We want to thank the people of Summit for their very- quick and generous response last week to the advertisement in The Summit Herald and the editorial in this column, both call- ing for Red Cross blood donors. Less than 100 had signed up at that time. Over 450 agreed to give blood finally. Summit exceeded its 300 pint quota by 43 pints. And now we find that there are some other matters which need taking care of—if you don't mind. v SURGICAL DRESSINGS BADLY NEEDED The Red Cross Surgical Dressings Department very urgent- ly needs your help. It is way below its high quota. Could you, with a little planning, spare a few hours before j noon or in the early afternoon? It would be of great help. Could you get the children off to school and plan your meals and work so that you could squeeze a few hours out of the week? The need, we understand is very great—not only in Summit where there is a big quota to fill, but on the fighting fronts and in the hospitals where surgical dressings are needed in increasing volume as more and more men go to war. ' t The Red Cross says: "Just walk in and say you are ready to help. No introductions or appointments are needed. You will be most welcome." ' ~ The. address, in case you have forgotten is the corner of Hobart and Springfield avenues. You can drive your car if you like. NOW ABOUT THOSE BOOKS And while you are at it there's something else you can do. The American Women's Voluntary Services—AWVS—| are collecting books for men and women in service and they are! not doing as well as they would like, they tell us. One trouble is they're getting the wrong kinds of books. What men in, service want is books to pass the time enjoyably, They get alii the text books they need in the day's work. Have you any best, sellers, mysteries, adventure stories, etc? If the book is so good you are a little reluctant to give it up, then it's probably just the thing. (And it should be in reason- ably good condition. It's going to have a hard jife, you know.)| To help on this, take books to the Library, the Lackawanna Station, Paulsen's Travel Bureau, Murphy's music shop, or British War Relief headquarters or phone Summit 6-1000. That's the number of Corby's Enterprise Laundry, which has undertaken to pick up books (a very nice gesture, we think), j Will you make up a bundle now for the armed services? j ' "Praise the Lord and Pass the New Editions," they're saying. VICTORY EXCHANGE By the way, have you been in the Victory Exchange recent- ly (355 Springfield Avenue)? That's where people bring things for sale and get paid in war stamps. You pay cash but trie j owners get paid in stamps. But what we meant to say is that | there are new things there continually—unusual things that you don't come across other places and, as far as we can make out, for sale at bargain prices. ' • • ** ! Drop in and have a look. The place is run entirely by vol- unteer women and it isn't a money-making proposition. The idea is to raise more money for the war in a very pleasant and interesting way. l ? Lieutenant Commander Seabiiry Cook, U. S. Navy Retired, who spent Christinas and New Year's day in an open lifeboat in the At- lantic, returned last week for a short stay at his home, 10 Fern- wood road. He spent thirty-nine •days on the open sea following the sinking lute in November of his merchant ship by a German sub- marine. Interviewed at his Hobart ave- nue home, Lt, Comm. Cook, who has his master's papers in the Mer- chant Marine, in <\vlileh he is serv- ing, said his vessel was struck' without warning by a torpedo, more than halfway on its voyage between South America and Africa. The crew put off in two lifeboats arid several'rafts. Double Session Meets Disapproval Of Parents' Groups Summit parents, led by Mrs. Bryant Marroun, president, of the Lincoln School Parent-Teacher As- sociation, have strongly opposed the Board of Educatian's. proposal to eliminate three teaching posi- tions in the elementary schools by scheduling double sessions for kin- dergartens. Under this plan Uie same teacher will have a class at one school in the morning and an- other at a different school in the afternoon. This, the parents feel, will not only curb the efficiency of liie teacher, but an afternoon session will affect the mental and physical health of the child. Elsewhere in this issue is a letter written by Dr. ! Arthur F. Ackerman, pediatrician, explaining the reasons for this. . An investigation of six New Jer- sey towns similar in character to Summit showed only one, Mont- clair, having transient kindergarten teachers. Three of that city's nine kindergarten teachers were found to' teach double sessions, but the classes are much smaller than some of those in Summit. It has been quoted to civic groups, report the parents, that Plainfield lias sev- enteen kindergarten teachers each teaching a double session. This, says a representative of the par- ents, is a misstatenient, for only five, with particularly small groups, teach morning and afternoon, and in each case the afternoon session is a coaching session only. The reason for this proposed change in the kindergarten depart- ment is to make available a sum of money that the Board of Education could use toward the Increments for teachers' salaries. The Boards of all Parent-Teacher Associations have met and declared themselves in favor of raising the salaries, this to be covered by a raised tax rate and not by cutting the number of teachers employed. "If they start cutting down now," says Mrs. Harroun, "the process will continue and each year some- thing new will be eliminated from the school system. Even in war- time the schools should be t:ie last place to suffer." Council Explains Curtailed Collection Of Ashes, Garbage Garbage will be collected but once each week from the residen- tial district and ashes twice a wwk as at present, beginning Monday, | Feb. 8. The collection from lliu j business district and apartment, •buildings will continue as hereto- fore. This schedule is for the win- ter months only. Common Council lias issued un explanatory statement about this curtailed service, as follows: "The Council has been reluctant to adopt this schedule, but has been forced to do so in order to main- jtaln a schedule which the citizens ,may rely on. The present schedule |is gradually falling behind, .es- pecially tue ash collections. This is due to the enormous increase in ash production due to the many con- versions from oil to coal fuel. (Ap- proximately G25 reported to date). "The curtailment of. the use of trucks due to tho gasoline and rub- ber situation, combined with tho scarcity of labor, makes it impos- sible for the Department to cope with the situation under the pres- ent schedule. "Many cities have been forced to this or some other change in oper- ations to meet the same situation; Yonkers, N. Y. has gone to onis garbage collection per weok, lOust Orange, Elizabeth and other nearby communities are experiencing great difficulty and are mucli behind their schedules. "There should be no great hard- ship to the householder who Is willing to cooperate. Garbage should be thoroughly drained and wrapped in paper before placing in tho covered can; by doing Ibis the possibility of freezing to tin; can and tlie presence of odors an; eliminated." in |he lagt grolip to leiive lhe vessel. Of liis experiences, Lt. Comm. Cook spolte, in part, as fol- lows: . "We slid down the listing side and clambered aboard a raft, where, with eight other survivors, including the armed guard officer, the captain, the radio officer and the messman, we watched the sub- marine surface and begin shelling 0U ,'^ te) ..' siuWng the snip the sub- marine came along side our raft him prisoner. The submarine then moved away on the surface and we were left with the problem of reaching the Sotith American coast, over 1,600 miles away." The lieutenant commander and ibis fellow survivors spent the re- mainder of the day and all night on the raft, which was leaking and in a sinking condition. At daybreak they saw a. swamped and abandon- ed lifeboat drifting down on them and managed to repair and right it. (Continued on Pago 2) Hon. P. van Zeeland Athenaeum Speaker On February 11th Thursday evening, February 11, Athenaeum members will hear Hon. Paul van Zeeland, former preniicr of Belgium, w:io will apeak on "The Problems of Post-War Reconstruc- tion in Kurope." Mr. van Zoeland, a, statesman of pre-war Europe, was educated at the University of Lou vain, France. He later received an advanced de- gree at Princeton University. Ho became a professor at Louvain Uni- versity, and later Director of Its Institute of Economic Sciences. Leaving the cloistered walls of his alma mater, he became vice-gov- ernor of the National Bank of Bel- gium, and then Minister of Foreign Affairs and of Foreign Commerce in Belgium. It was during the crucial years precedng World War II that Mr. van Zeeland was premier of Belgium, and had a large share, in the shaping of her foreign policy. Mr. van Zeeland is now chairman of the Co-Ordinating Foundation of the Intergovernmental Committee for Refugees; and in that capacity spent the latter half of 1942 in England, where he was in contact with all of the governments-in- exile of tae occupied countries. He returned to this country early in January; and must shortly go back to Europe. Only the fortunate cir- cumstances that his two sons are in school in Summit made it pos- sible for the Athenaeum to secure him as a spfeaker. The lecture will be given In the High School auditorium at 8:15. Mrs. Hyde Heads Board of Education; Committees Named Mrs. Reed W. Hyde was eluded president of the Board of Education at tho annual organization meet- ing Monday. J. Ross. Tuttle was elected vice-president. Committees were named with liio following an chairmen: Cartelun Pierson, public relations; Mr. Tuttle, education; Raymond Hoi- sing, business and H. W. Treleaven, legislative. At its Tuesday meeting, it ia ex- pected the board will act on this adoption of the budget for the 1943-44 school year. Resolution On Death Of A. Shuart Reed Common Council Tuesday Reed, -general secretary of the Y. M. C. A. and de.puty commander of Summit's OCD. The resolution em- phasized Mr. Reed's integrity, ,his wise counsel, able friendship, and his wide clvi.Q. activity. A standing vote was had on the resolution. Arrested Fifth Time As Army Deserter Private Granville Conway was arrested Friday night by Summit polico at 170 Broad street on charges of desertion from the Army. Police declare this was Conway's fifth offense. Military Police came on from Fort Dlx and took him in charge. What disposi- tion was made of Conway's case has not been ascertained by Sum- mit police. "I'M GLAD I TOLD 'EM ABOUT FERNWOOD." 116 Summit avenue, Summit 6-6399. adv. College Club Passes Resolution On Teachers 1 Salaries At an afternoon meeting of the. College Club held in Lincoln School Auditorium on Jan. 2!l, Miss Margaret Acker, president of Urn club introduced the reports of tho Teacher's Salary Survey Commit- tee and the Training Courne for Child Care Aides as representing the two outstanding community projects In which the club hud par- ticipated this year. Miss Caroline Hinmuii HliuweU colored motion pictures and de- scribed the progress of her party through the Canadian Northwest on their threu weeks' camping trip last summer. iMra. Frank M. Allen, who! re- ported on the salary study, was as- sisted toy Mrs, Walter Glide and Mrs. Reid I-jyde during the (juos- tion period, The following resolu- tion was unanimously passed. "Whe'reas the members of this Summit Branch of the American Association of University WOIIHMI favor a superior school system and "Whereas an important factor in maintaining gueh a system is thu- need to attract and to hold superior teachers by means of adequate Hill- ary provisions. "Therefore lie resolved the .imsni- bers of the branch are in agree- ment with the proposals made to •date by the Salary Survey Commit- tee and recommend to the Board of Education that the salary budget :for this year toe Increased by tin-, sum of $5,000 so that theso pro- posals may ibe carried out in not. more than three years." FOR PROMPT AND EFFICIENT claim service, buy 'your insurance locally. Spencer M. Maben, 24 Beechwood Road. Su. 6-2252.— ; adv.

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Kucord, Summit Press and Summit News-Guide
Subscription $2.00 a Year
Mailed in conformity with P. 0. D. Order No. 19087,
rlERALD \
OFFICIAL Official Newspaper of City ami County. Published Thursday A. M. by The Summit Publishing Co., 357 Springfield Avenue. Entered at tho Post Office, Summit, N. J., as 2nd Class Matter.
54th Year. No. 34 FRED L. PALMER, Editor & Publisher THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1943 J. EDWIN CARTER, Business Mgr. & Publisher 5 CENTS
Red Cross Now Knows It Must Raise Nearly $52,000 Here
The Summit Red Cross now knows it has the job of raisins nearly $52,000 this year. (The exact amount is $51,900).
This figure compares with a little more than $38,000 raised, last year through the war fund drive ($28,837) and the annual roll call about two months previously ($9,278).
The amount must be raised in Summit, New Providence Borough, New Providence Township,, Passaic Township and part of Millington. G. H. Brewer, who was chairman of last year's War Fund Drive, has agreed to take the same job this year.
"We will follow the organization plan and pattern which was suc- cessful last year," Mr. Brewer said, "and expect to have the organization completed shortly. We will raUe money by direct solicitation and by various types .of functions—bridge luncheons and teas and similar events. We know that the job is a big one but the need has become very much greater and wo do not doubt we will have the full support of all the communities whose help wo will ask."
The drive begins formally throughout the United States on
REGISTER YOUR DOG owners are glvm ten
duys to purchase a license mid official registration tu# for pets. !)«(? regrlstrfttton started <w January 1 and should him' been completed on the 30th. Summit residents, however, did not se«ni to realize this fact, mid beginning Feb. 1, the Summit Foilcc storied a house to house canvass to check on the nuuiher of unli- censed ptts in the elty. The penalty for not registering a dog runs from $5 to $50.
Many Want To Hear War Prisoners'Aid Committee Head Here1!
February 28 which has been named Red Cross Sunday.
Summit Blood Donors Contribute 43 Pints Above Set Quota
Summit citizens responded so enT thusiastically to the Red Cross ap- ,peal for Blood Donors that 13 pints aljovo tho'fluflta we.ni-.. QnUlbuted here Tuesday and Wednesday when the Hod Cross Mobile Unit was at tho Y.M.C.A. A total of 343 pints were .given! 172 Tuesday and 171 Wednesday.
This was done despite the fact that Monday morning the daily quota for Summit was raised from 140 to 150 pints and 225 donors in- stead of 200 had to ibe signed up each day.
"We are deeply grateful," said Garloton Pierson, chairman of the Blood Bank Committee of the local Hed Cross chapter, "to all who of- fered to donate their blood and who helped us make so fine a showing."
Victory Book Drive Is Lagging; Your Help Urgently Needed
The 1943 Victory Book Campaign tor taoii and women In service, which is being conducted in Sum- mit as part of the campaign of a National Committee, is lagging-ac- cording to a spokesman for the Summit unit of the American Wom- en's Voluntary Services who are designated as the local collection agency.
Somo books that are being con- tributed here are unsuitable in character and in their,physical con- dition. The kind of book that kills dull hours on a long trip is the kind of book men and women in service Heck, the A.W.V.S. points out. Read- ing matter sought Includes current best sollers, mystery and adventure stories.
If you have books and are un- able to deliver to oue of the fol- lowing depositories: Public Libra- ry, D., h. '& W. Station, Paulson's Travel Bureau, Murphy's Music Store and the British War Reliet workrooms, you are asked to tele- phono Corby's Enterprise Laundry. Inc., Summit 6-1000 and one of the laundry trucks will call for the books and deposit them,
The&jVar Department has an- nounceaHhat overseas mailing reg- ulations do not apply to books donated to, the campaign.
Two slogans'apropos tue Victory Campaign that have received some attention are these: "Praise the Lord and Pass the New. Edition" and "Best Seller for*Roal Sellefs."
The Y. M. C. A. reports that res- ervations are being received earlier than usual for the annual dinner Monday night, February 8 and it is now expected that between 150 and 200 will attend to hear Tracy Strong, director of Y. M. C. A. War Prisoners' Aid in all belligerent countries. He.will talk on "YMCA Work Witii Prisoners of War."
In view of the widespread public interest in this subject the associ- ation has again called attention to the fact that anyone interested in. the work of the ''Y" may attend the annual meeting and dinner by call- the Y. M. C. A. office and expressing a wish to do so. (Dinner -will be served at C:4B so that commuters may go direct to the Y, M. C. A, The charge is $1.15.) Dinner will be served by the "William Pitt Tavern from the "Y" kitchen. ' •
"Tracy Strong Is responsible for keeping up the spirits of more than 4,000,000 prisoners, both Allied and Axis in .-"fiixteen countries," Y/MCA officials "said. "His job gives him •the right theoretically to enter Ger- many or Japan or any other nation at war with the United States. So •tor -lie-haso*! -taken advantage of the opportunity but he may do so soon, Strong's men visit thousands of prison camps, talk to the .men, distribute musical instruments, garden tools and the like, plan ath- letic and theatricalprogranis,rec- reation and study. Neutral agents are usually used. The German Y. M. C. A, man is a Dane."
The program will also include a brief skit by the Hi-Y which will indicate the purpose of Y. M. C. A,| work. The president, Alfred W,' Alesbury, will make his report. Di- rectors will be elected and after the meeting will choose directors. The slate of new directors (normally seven are chosen each year for a three-year term but this year there are eight because of the resigna- tion of Douglas Hardy for war ser- vice) is as follows: Ernest P. Pat- ten, who has been nominated for a. third term; Kriicst F. Loathom, who is filling, tm unexpireii term; Rome Betts and Reed \V. Hyde, both of whom have previously been direc- tors; W. W. Codke, John B. Dou- gall, Fred' L. Palmer aud Robert Peterson, none of whom havo boon directors before.
H. S. Basketball Team Says Millkrn Boys- Were Misrepresented
Andrew Genualdi, captain of Summit High School's basketball team and William Clarke, manager, have written a letter about a re- port in the January 14 Herald of a Millburn-Summlt High Schools basketball game at Millburn:
The letter follows: "In-the Summit Herald of Thurs-
day, January 14. 1943 on page 14 appeared the following paragraph:
". 'As the varsity game ended, the Millburn quintet greeted the Sum- mit boys in the dressing room with the remark: "Guess you fellows' un- eratand now we don't like you uys, no how.' ''To the knowledge, of the mem-
bers of the Summit High School basketball team, no such statement was made by the Millburn players. We believe, therefore, in justice to all concerned, that this statement should be definitely retracted and are asking you to publish this letter.
"For a long time both schools have enjoyed neighborly sports rivalry and we on our part hope to continue this relationship with Millburn High School on the same basis of keen competition and good sportsmanship."
SUMMIT MAN TELLS OF 39=DAY LIFEBOAT EXPERIENCES AT SEA
The Herald
letterhead He asked
of the high whether the
signers had proposed the letter or whether Mr. Bartholomew had re- quested it. He was told the boys had gone to their coach. He asked whether the letter had been dic- tated or whether the boys had com- posed it. He was told the boys composed it. Ho asked whether the boys had been called in and asked to sign the letter.
Mr, Bartholomew wanted to know what difference it made whether the boys suggested the, letter or notT" The "Editor'stiu'he wanted to judge whether the boys might have signed, the letter thinking that it would be unwise for them not to do so. Mr. Bartholdmew then said; "Don't publish' the letter if you don't want to/.\and hiing up in the midst of the conversation.
FIREMEN'S FLAME A few tickets, all reserved,
ure still available tor the "Firemen's Flame," the annuul High School €r. 0. Show, to be presented tomorrow night at 8:15 In the High School audi- torium. Tickets may be pur- chased by calling the Blgrh School office, Sn. 6-2213.
Ready To Hold Practice Test Of Defense Units
"Plans for the Feb. 7 test of the Red Cross disaster groups, police reserve, messengers, ambulance aud emergency food and housing corps of the Summit defense units are rapidly taking final form and an excellent turn-out of 'refugees' (junior and senior high school pu- n-ils) is confidently expected," de- clares Director Maxwell Lester, Jr. of this city's OCD office.
Parents of "refugees" are urged not to make plans that will conflict with participation by the boya and girls in this community service. Traffic will not be halted and. war-! dens and others not specifically listed above are not to be called out.
Would Confer With City On Enacting Curfew Law
In letter received' night, Common Counoll,
Tuesday was in-
formed by the Council of Social Agencles-Defeiise Service Council, it 'would gladly confer with the city •government in formulating a cur- few tor Summit youogsteiM under 14.
"IN A CLASS BY ITSELF" . . . Exclusive: Famous Fox Scientific care of the hair; Ferftwood Perma- nents; Nina Facials; Nina Cos- metics. Fernwood Hairdressers, 116 Summit avenue. adv.
Studies Ways To Save $100,000 In City Budget
Summit Taxpayers' Association at a meeting;, Monday night, post- poned from last Thursday because of the storm, listened to proposals from its president, Howard D. Mc- Oeorgc, on means of city retrench- ment in this year's city pudget, which he estimated would save the city upwards of $1QO,000 in appro- priations. All of Mr. McGeorge's propdsals were submitted for com- mittee study. They included the following: •
1, The possibility of merging the office of the city treasurer and the receiver of taxes resulting in a saving of the number of personnel required; 2. Elimination of the of- fice of building inspector, inas- much as little or;tio building will be done during; the war; 3. The cleaning of paper off the streets, which now costs the city $5,000 an- nually, by the business men in front of their own establishments; 4. The city carry its own insurance and thus-get the. benefit between the spread of tho Cost-of the in- surance to the underwriter and to the.insured; .5. Save a .large amount of the salaries pajd, the city soli- citor and the city, clerk, money paid out for talent -which Mr. McGeorge claims the city is not now getting hi the clerk's office for he hires other clerks 'to dp the work; G. Savings In the police department after study has been made of the present assignment of the 'person-
nel; 7. Like action in the fire de- partment; ; 8. Give relief to real es- tate by placing more taxes, on per- sonal property; ft. Buy electricity wholesale from Jersey Central Power and Light Co. and sell It at retail);-.and eliminate the office of city physician, and turn his duties over ;to the Board of Health physician.
THIS IS THE WAY HE AM) HIS COMPANIONS APPEARED AT EM) OF .TOUItXKY
His merchant ship 'torpedoed and sunk . . . . all hands listed as "missing siiul presumed lost" . . . . *I» days in a Hfehont, bobbing over 1,B()I) miles of 1he Atlantic . . . . finally land—and then home. That's tho newest experience.of Lt, Com, Sealiury Cook, of 10 Foruwood mad, 47-year-«l<l veteran of the sea (seated at the reader's right). He was ]>«iisl<iii«d lij tli<> Nnvy In liWil after 2« years of service and then took a civilian war job, tried to-get Imek In the Navy iviihmil success mid then enlisted In tho Merchant Mnrlne. He sailed as second mate lust Noveniliur on the mrtro vessel which was sunk. He said that after they left the sinking vessel tliey lind no comiiass, sextant, chart, or,oven a wutch, but "there were plenty of stars to steer'by. T.he'Wff aOO-poimdcrs in the crew lost a tot of weight, and 1 dropped 25 pounds to 12.*). Hut the big fellows tell it most."
OUR TOWN J
C. D. of A. Meets Cour.t Benedict No. 611, Catholic
daughters ot America, will hold the regular business meeting on Tues- day evening, February 9» at 8:30 p. m. in the club rooms at St. Teresa's School, Morris avenue.
BUTTONHOLES, B U f T O N S," hemstitching. Poyle'a Sewing Ma- chine Store, 480 sprin&tleld Ave.
—adv,-tf
SOME MORE MATTERS We want to thank the people of Summit for their very-
quick and generous response last week to the advertisement in The Summit Herald and the editorial in this column, both call- ing for Red Cross blood donors. Less than 100 had signed up at that time. Over 450 agreed to give blood finally. Summit exceeded its 300 pint quota by 43 pints.
And now we find that there are some other matters which need taking care of—if you don't mind. v
SURGICAL DRESSINGS BADLY NEEDED The Red Cross Surgical Dressings Department very urgent-
ly needs your help. I t is way below its high quota. Could you, with a little planning, spare a few hours before j
noon or in the early afternoon? It would be of great help. Could you get the children off to school and plan your meals and work so that you could squeeze a few hours out of the week? The need, we understand is very great—not only in Summit where there is a big quota to fill, but on the fighting fronts and in the hospitals where surgical dressings are needed in increasing volume as more and more men go to war.
't The Red Cross says: "Just walk in and say you are ready to help. No introductions or appointments are needed. You will be most welcome." ' ~
The. address, in case you have forgotten is the corner of Hobart and Springfield avenues. You can drive your car if you like.
NOW ABOUT THOSE BOOKS And while you are at it there's something else you can do. The American Women's Voluntary Services—AWVS—|
are collecting books for men and women in service and they are! not doing as well as they would like, they tell us. One trouble is they're getting the wrong kinds of books. What men in, service want is books to pass the time enjoyably, They get alii the text books they need in the day's work. Have you any best, sellers, mysteries, adventure stories, e tc?
• If the book is so good you are a little reluctant to give it up, then it's probably just the thing. (And it should be in reason- ably good condition. It's going to have a hard jife, you know.)|
To help on this, take books to the Library, the Lackawanna Station, Paulsen's Travel Bureau, Murphy's music shop, or British War Relief headquarters or phone Summit 6-1000. That's the number of Corby's Enterprise Laundry, which has undertaken to pick up books (a very nice gesture, we think), j
Will you make up a bundle now for the armed services? j ' "Praise the Lord and Pass the New Editions," they're
saying.
VICTORY EXCHANGE By the way, have you been in the Victory Exchange recent-
ly (355 Springfield Avenue)? That's where people bring things for sale and get paid in war stamps. You pay cash but trie j owners get paid in stamps. But what we meant to say is that | there are new things there continually—unusual things that you don't come across other places and, as far as we can make out, for sale at bargain prices. ' • • ** !
Drop in and have a look. The place is run entirely by vol- unteer women and it isn't a money-making proposition. The idea is to raise more money for the war in a very pleasant and interesting way.
l?
Lieutenant Commander Seabiiry Cook, U. S. Navy Retired, who spent Christinas and New Year's day in an open lifeboat in the At- lantic, returned last week for a short stay at his home, 10 Fern- wood road. He spent thirty-nine •days on the open sea following the sinking lute in November of his merchant ship by a German sub- marine.
Interviewed at his Hobart ave- nue home, Lt, Comm. Cook, who has his master's papers in the Mer- chant Marine, in <\vlileh he is serv- ing, said his vessel was struck' without warning by a torpedo, more than halfway on its voyage between South America and Africa. The crew put off in two lifeboats arid several'rafts.
Double Session Meets Disapproval Of Parents' Groups
Summit parents, led by Mrs. Bryant Marroun, president, of the Lincoln School Parent-Teacher As- sociation, have strongly opposed the Board of Educatian's. proposal to eliminate three teaching posi- tions in the elementary schools by scheduling double sessions for kin- dergartens. Under this plan Uie same teacher will have a class at one school in the morning and an- other at a different school in the afternoon.
This, the parents feel, will not only curb the efficiency of liie teacher, but an afternoon session will affect the mental and physical health of the child. Elsewhere in this issue is a letter written by Dr.
! Arthur F. Ackerman, pediatrician, explaining the reasons for this. .
An investigation of six New Jer- sey towns similar in character to Summit showed only one, Mont- clair, having transient kindergarten teachers. Three of that city's nine kindergarten teachers were found to' teach double sessions, but the classes are much smaller than some of those in Summit. It has been quoted to civic groups, report the parents, that Plainfield lias sev- enteen kindergarten teachers each teaching a double session. This, says a representative of the par- ents, is a misstatenient, for only five, with particularly small groups, teach morning and afternoon, and in each case the afternoon session is a coaching session only.
The reason for this proposed change in the kindergarten depart- ment is to make available a sum of money that the Board of Education could use toward the Increments for teachers' salaries.
The Boards of all Parent-Teacher Associations have met and declared themselves in favor of raising the salaries, this to be covered by a raised tax rate and not by cutting the number of teachers employed.
"If they start cutting down now," says Mrs. Harroun, "the process will continue and each year some- thing new will be eliminated from the school system. Even in war- time the schools should be t:ie last place to suffer."
Council Explains Curtailed Collection Of Ashes, Garbage
Garbage will be collected but once each week from the residen- tial district and ashes twice a wwk as at present, beginning Monday,
| Feb. 8. The collection from lliu j business district and apartment, •buildings will continue as hereto- fore. This schedule is for the win- ter months only.
Common Council lias issued un explanatory statement about this curtailed service, as follows:
"The Council has been reluctant to adopt this schedule, but has been forced to do so in order to main-
jtaln a schedule which the citizens ,may rely on. The present schedule |is gradually falling behind, .es- pecially tue ash collections. This is due to the enormous increase in ash production due to the many con- versions from oil to coal fuel. (Ap- proximately G25 reported to date).
"The curtailment of. the use of trucks due to tho gasoline and rub- ber situation, combined with tho scarcity of labor, makes it impos- sible for the Department to cope with the situation under the pres- ent schedule.
"Many cities have been forced to this or some other change in oper- ations to meet the same situation; Yonkers, N. Y. has gone to onis garbage collection per weok, lOust Orange, Elizabeth and other nearby communities are experiencing great difficulty and are mucli behind their schedules.
"There should be no great hard- ship to the householder who Is willing to cooperate. Garbage should be thoroughly drained and wrapped in paper before placing in tho covered can; by doing Ibis the possibility of freezing to tin; can and tlie presence of odors an; eliminated."
in | h e l a g t g r o l i p t o l e i i ve l h e
vessel. Of liis experiences, Lt. Comm. Cook spolte, in part, as fol- lows: .
"We slid down the listing side and clambered aboard a raft, where, with eight other survivors, including the armed guard officer, the captain, the radio officer and the messman, we watched the sub- marine surface and begin shelling 0U,'^te)..' s i u W n g t h e s n i p the sub- marine came along side our raft
him prisoner. The submarine then moved away on the surface and we were left with the problem of reaching the Sotith American coast, over 1,600 miles away."
The lieutenant commander and ibis fellow survivors spent the re- mainder of the day and all night on the raft, which was leaking and in a sinking condition. At daybreak they saw a. swamped and abandon- ed lifeboat drifting down on them and managed to repair and right it.
(Continued on Pago 2)
Hon. P. van Zeeland Athenaeum Speaker On February 11th
Thursday evening, February 11, Athenaeum members will hear Hon. Paul van Zeeland, former preniicr of Belgium, w:io will apeak on "The Problems of Post-War Reconstruc- tion in Kurope."
Mr. van Zoeland, a, statesman of pre-war Europe, was educated at the University of Lou vain, France. He later received an advanced de- gree at Princeton University. Ho became a professor at Louvain Uni- versity, and later Director of Its Institute of Economic Sciences. Leaving the cloistered walls of his alma mater, he became vice-gov- ernor of the National Bank of Bel- gium, and then Minister of Foreign Affairs and of Foreign Commerce in Belgium. It was during the crucial years precedng World War II that Mr. van Zeeland was premier of Belgium, and had a large share, in the shaping of her foreign policy.
Mr. van Zeeland is now chairman of the Co-Ordinating Foundation of the Intergovernmental Committee for Refugees; and in that capacity spent the latter half of 1942 in England, where he was in contact with all of the governments-in- exile of tae occupied countries. He returned to this country early in January; and must shortly go back to Europe. Only the fortunate cir- cumstances that his two sons are in school in Summit made it pos- sible for the Athenaeum to secure him as a spfeaker. The lecture will be given In the High School auditorium at 8:15.
Mrs. Hyde Heads Board of Education; Committees Named
Mrs. Reed W. Hyde was eluded president of the Board of Education at tho annual organization meet- ing Monday. J. Ross. Tuttle was elected vice-president.
Committees were named with liio following an chairmen: Cartelun Pierson, public relations; Mr. Tuttle, education; Raymond Hoi- sing, business and H. W. Treleaven, legislative.
At its Tuesday meeting, it ia ex- pected the board will act on this adoption of the budget for the 1943-44 school year.
Resolution On Death Of A. Shuart Reed
Common Council Tuesday
Reed, -general secretary of the Y. M. C. A. and de.puty commander of Summit's OCD. The resolution em- phasized Mr. Reed's integrity, ,his wise counsel, able friendship, and his wide clvi.Q. activity. A standing vote was had on the resolution.
Arrested Fifth Time As Army Deserter
Private Granville Conway was arrested Friday night by Summit polico at 170 Broad street on charges of desertion from the Army. Police declare this was Conway's fifth offense. Military Police came on from Fort Dlx and took him in charge. What disposi- tion was made of Conway's case has not been ascertained by Sum- mit police.
"I'M GLAD I TOLD 'EM ABOUT FERNWOOD." 116 Summit avenue, Summit 6-6399. adv.
College Club Passes Resolution On Teachers1 Salaries
At an afternoon meeting of the. College Club held in Lincoln School Auditorium on Jan. 2!l, Miss Margaret Acker, president of Urn club introduced the reports of tho Teacher's Salary Survey Commit- tee and the Training Courne for Child Care Aides as representing the two outstanding community projects In which the club hud par- ticipated this year.
Miss Caroline Hinmuii HliuweU colored motion pictures and de- scribed the progress of her party through the Canadian Northwest on their threu weeks' camping trip last summer.
iMra. Frank M. Allen, who! re- ported on the salary study, was as- sisted toy Mrs, Walter Glide and Mrs. Reid I-jyde during the (juos- tion period, The following resolu- tion was unanimously passed.
"Whe'reas the members of this Summit Branch of the American Association of University WOIIHMI favor a superior school system and
"Whereas an important factor in maintaining gueh a system is thu- need to attract and to hold superior teachers by means of adequate Hill- ary provisions.
"Therefore lie resolved the .imsni- bers of the branch are in agree- ment with the proposals made to •date by the Salary Survey Commit- tee and recommend to the Board of Education that the salary budget :for this year toe Increased by tin-, sum of $5,000 so that theso pro- posals may ibe carried out in not. more than three years."
FOR PROMPT AND EFFICIENT claim service, buy 'your insurance locally. Spencer M. Maben, 24 Beechwood Road. Su. 6-2252.—;adv.
I THE SUMMIT HERALD, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1943
\\
Survives Torpedoing 39 Days In Lifeboat; Sailed 1,600 Miles
< C ' < i i i i i i i u > - < l f r i i n i I ' j i f ! ' 1
"I'.'iiiiM two oai'.s III.HIHMI us ;i must, and pieces of salvaged canvas :i.s a sail, we set out. for Hie South American coast," l.t. Com in. Conk coulinui'd. lie i-.diletl:
"We li;ul u boukt?r of 15 sallon.s or wilier In start, with and were lucky enough to augment this fi'imi time- l.o lime because H rained 'A'.\ our nf ilii! .'!!) day.s.
"We were fortunate in having a f:ivuiiiiK wind for most of the time, niakins as a result as high as 120 miles in u single day, although on l>e<::tlme.<i diiyK, we miidft no pro- j;.n:«s.
"On tin; live days which the sun rliDiic, we. took the occasion to go swimming- lo escape its ravages ;:nd try to catch one of the many
dolphins, which were always near the boat, to add to our larder.
"One of the dolphins accompanied us for more than thirty days, swim- ing, day and night, just out of reach, at I lie stern of the boat. We: adopted the fish ;is a good-luck, charin and nicknamed it 'John Dol- phin.1
"A very business-like snarl; at- tacked us once, going straight for our lifeboat, trying to wreck il, and then swishing it with iii.s tail. Finding his effort.1, to no avail, he went on his way."
Landing early in January 'in a marsh on the northeast lip of South America, the survivors followed the shore northward and came upon a small town, where, after much trouble trying to make them- selves understood, they received food and were hospitalized.
Lt. Comm. Cook attributes the success of his bout in reaching South America to the skill and leadership of Cupt. Greenlow.
Shortly after landing, Lit. Comm. Cook took his penciled log and typed copies of it, one of which he
DEFENSE DIRECTOR ANSWERS APPEAL TO "GIVE A BOOK'
r BEGINNING FRIDAY, FEB. 5 THRU SAT., FEB. 13
Save Now! ONCE-A-YEAR SALE
Helena Rubinstein BEAUTY PREPARATIONS Important news for your beauty budget— especially this year!' Don't miss this chance to get your daily essentials and the extras you've longed for—all at a saving of 20%! Plan to include a set of fragrant bath ac- cessories, a special masque treatment, an exquisite Helena Rubinstein perfume. Check over this list now and order at once! Limit- ed time only.
Regular Price* Now Pasteurized Face Cream
Novena Night Cream
Special Eye Cream
1.20 1.00 3.00
NOTE: Cologne Eau de Toilette, Gift Sets and Beauty Luggage not included in this sale.
' Ceiling prices.
CUT RATE
430 SPRINGFIELD AVE. SUMMIT, N. J.
MAXWELL LTCSTElt, Jit., director of civilian defense, contributing the first book to tlic lift.'! I Victory ltook Campaign in Summit. Books lire beiiiff collected for members of the. tuition's urnieil forces.
•Standinglit left is Mrs. Nicholas •). IIIISSCJ, acting rliulrmnn of the American Women's Voluntary Services; seated, Mrs. Howe S. Allmitt, chairman of the A. VI. V. S. Victory Book Committee.
keeps as a memento of the argosy. Besides the water, the log details the following larder the men toad to start their 3i)-day journey with: 10fi bottles malted milk tablets, 52 box- es of "C" ration crackers (25 in a box), 55 three ounce tins of pem- nican and 05 packages of chocolate (8 squares to a box). Small fish were caught, from time to time, -which were eaten raw.
"Sleeping at the best was most difficult," declared the Summit man. He added:
"We used life preservers as pil- lows. Dec. 15, we ran out of 'mak- ings' and then Dec. 18 -we tried to smoke fope yarn, but without much success. Always the thoughts of the men were about food. I think I jotted down everything I would like to eat. Since we -were favored with moderate weather, our dreams of food wandered to cold cans of to- matoes, butter milk, clam broth, Philadelphia Scrapple, scrambled eggs, jellied joints of veal, Boston baked beans, raw carrots, celery, Welsh rarebit, lobster stew, etc."
One of Lit. Convm. Cook's first thoughts after starting out on his memorable journey' was that he could ,be adrift on the life hoat at least eight hours to equal th% rec- ord of Mrs'. Cook 'who had spent eight hours on a life 'boat after be- ing on the shipwrecked S.S. Colum- bia off the coast of Southern Cali- fornia in 1931.
Lt. Comm. Cook, a graduate of the U. S. Naval Academy at An- napolis, Class of 1917, is a World War 1 veteran having served on the U.S-.S. Vermont and the U.S.S..Pat- terson.
Lt. Lt. Comm. Cook and Mrs. Cook, have a son, Robert S. Cook. 22, who is an Ensign in the Naval Reserve, having recently won his "Wings of Gold" after having com- pleted the prescribed 'flight train- ing course at the U. S. Naval Air' Training Center Pensacola, Fla.
Public Is Obeying Regulations Banning Pleasure Driving
The public at large is obeying the regulations banning pleasure dri- ving very well, in the opinion of the local War Price and Rationing Board, as expressed by its chair- man, Oliver B. Merrill. There are some, however, he says, who con- tinue to use their cars to go to meetings, visit friends, and make other forbidden trips.
To those persons who are report- ed by the police as possible viola- tors, the board is sending letters calling attention to the suspected violation and asking for an explan- ation as to why the car was being used on a specified date. People are responding to these letters.
In those cases where evidence of intentional violation is sufficient, the owner of the car is summoned to appear before the board at a certain date. One such appeared before the local board last Monday night. The owner of the car de- nied that he was at the place re- ported and offered an alibi. The hearing was therefore postponed until next Monday when he prom- ises to present witnesses to sub- stantiate his alibi.
Local Assistance Board Named By Acting Mayor
Common Council Tuesday night passed a resolution approving Act- ing Mayor G. Harry Cullis' action in naming a Local Assistance Board in conformity to State law. The acting mayor named the fol- lowing to the board and for the term indicated:
Mrs. Irene Baldwin, Dec. 31, 1943; John Barker, Dec. 31, 1944; Rome A. Belts, Dec. 31, 1945; Anna Richardson, M. D., Dec. 31, 194G, and Adolph Root, Dec. 31, 1947.
The board acts as an. advisory group to the Welfare Board.
.(—V—(._ « — I — I — W l - l - M . 4— ( _ (.—l—L
AWordtotheWise
Son to T. S. Medfords
Lieut, and Mrs. T. S. Medford an- nounce the birth of a son, Thomas Stanley, on January G. Lieut. Med- ford, who has been serving with the Pacific FleeL for the past two years, has recently been transferred to the Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Landing Force.
Repair materials for frozen plumbing ami burst pipes are difficult, and sometimes impossible, To obtain right
PUBLIC FRUIT EXCHANGE 343 Springfield Ave. (Next to Public Service Office) Telephone Su. 6-1319
GUARANTEED STRICTLY FRESH EGGS d0,45= LARGE INDIAN RIVER
THIN-SKINNED JUICY GRAPEFRUIT c,ch SWEET TENDER FULL POD PEAS .,, 12e
SWEET JUICY ' — — —
LARGE HEAPS CRISP BOSTON LETTUCE ^ g« IMJIAN RIVER
SWEET JUICY TANGERINES doz \ 5 c———— . . , . , __ JUICY THIN-SKINNED LEMONS •17-25° CRISP TENDER CELERY 2 — - 9C
FANCY SWEET POTATOES 2—9 C
JACK and TED. Telephone Su. 6-1319
Iday i:
Made Honorary Members Mayor Guido F. Forster, former
Mayor Rufoni Franklin, Win. Itae Crane, the Rev. Dr. Otto C. Nelson and Emil Smijkel, were made hon-
' orary members of Summit Kiwa-nis Club by unanimous vote of the club at its weekly luncheon Tues- day in the Hotel Beechwood.
BOY SCOUT WEEK Hoy Scout Week (February
C-lii) will l)c observed in Sum- mit by exhibits planned by the various troops and placed in store windows to lie judged by the local Chamber of Com- merce.
Hoy Scout Sunday, February 7, the troops will attend church services in a body.
Advertising in the HERALD -will pay you dividends.
So safeguard your water pipes during extremely cold weather.
• Wrap all exposed pipes with rags or newspapers.
• During extreme cold spells let water trickle all night jroxn one faucet (a quart a minute is enough).
Commonwealth Water Company
SPECIAL! FIREPLACE GRATES
M/MFR Haz^dtuare
ouse wares •^31 SPRINGFIELD AVE.-Tel.SU. 6-1121-SUMM I T - N..J.
Jams Halt Many 'Tween Job; Home, Snow Loader Busy
Jammed buses I'ViiUiy and S:ilni'- day 011 the; limi-, ruiniiiiK in and from Summit si ru^Klcd against snow moi'iuils in their cfl'in'ls in m:t workers to and from ihcii1 home--; as the city riTOVt'i'eil slowly from the t'l'i'i'ct. of lasl Thursday's snow- storm, the heaviest of tlic year here.
With hundriulH of persons unable to uso their suow-buiiml-car.; and other hundred;; of machines virtu- ally s<.T;j])pet! during this ban on lileasun; driving. Ill" demand for lms service here has increased con- siderably.
Ifclayed .schedules' added lo l:ie confusion and hundreds weve late KOiliK to work as were school chil- dren who use the bases.
Truffle congestion was especially had hen; In the business seel km on Thursday and was not, much re- lieved until late Friday after Iho city's sole snow loader bewail lo clear away the lurn*' piles of snow continuous aloiiK t;ie curbs, iiy Friday morning I he city had prac- tically completed snow plowing most of the city's s treets with I ho result tha t traffic moved fairly smoothly except in the congesled business seel ion.
Tux is have been doing a rushiiiR business since Thursday 's slorm, in fact, loo nishiiiK to "lease lae own- ers. Lai'Ke numbers of telephone calls flooded taxi offices, wilh num- bers of prosjiiiciive riders obliged, lo
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Dimes Really March j At Brayion School Rally j
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f e a t u r e o T t i n - ; f . - i . - - . i - ] i i l i ly p i a : , r a m !
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k i i i d e r K a r l e n l i a n d , n i a r e l i e d l o s h e
. a u d i t o r i u m a m i p l a c e d I h e i r d i m e s in Hie c a r d l i u a r d I M X C - . p r o v i d e d h y
I t h e I n f a n t i l e I ' a i . i l y s i s F u n d I n c . ! i O V l e I ' i r s l L ' . r a d e c l a - ' . ' - T i i i i i M > - l i { i \ V ( i l I
i l l s K o l i i ' i ' i i s i l y l i y c o n : l i h i i l i n . u t h e 1
; e n t i l e c o n l e n i s o f i t s I r e a s i u v s a v i !
I a n o d d f i v e - c e n t p i e c e . i
r DEATHS
\ —s Mrs. Mary Balish
Mi.--. .Maiy l;.ili:-ii. t;u, w idow of tin* hue riaba Halisli . d i e d , , T u e s d a y of aii a.•till" hea r i a t t a c k al hei' h o m e , f,UL' M o r r i s a v e n u e . S h e w a s born in D a m a s c u s . S y r i a . S h e is Miivived hy i i y foli.iwiii).'; c h i l d r e n : Ksa. in the N a v y ; l l e o i n e . Ida. Hose and T h o m a s , al h o m e ; C o r p o r a l i-Miviiol l i a l i sh . in Nor th Afr ica with the A r m y and Mrs . N i c h o l a s M o u r c a d e .
F u n e r a l service-', will lie he ld to- m o r r o w ai L' p. in. in C e n l r a l l ' r e s - b y i e r i a n Chin eh.
. F r i e n d s of Corp . I ' .alish w r i t i n g him a r e a s k e d urn lo say anyt-hiiif; to him aboiii h is m o t h e r ' s death. It. is the wish of the fami ly he d o e s n ' t know anyihini ' . about h e r d e a t h .
THE FIRST NATIONAI, BANK I AND TRUST COMPANY
SUMMIT, NEW JERSEY
Spark Pings
exchange
More miles per gallon of gas. Guaranteed to start your motor faster.
?irt$tOne Extra-Life BATTERY for Dependable
Starting exchange
For an extra surge of power to start your motor on coldest days, and for dependable service over a longer period of time, equip your car now with this big, supor-powor battery. Heavier, larger plates.
YO MOTOR
OIL CLEAN!
O I L F I L T E R C A R T R I D G E S
89* UP
Dirty oil is ruinous to motors. One sure way to protect them is to instal l new Oil Fi l ter Cartridges at regular intervals.
Tube Repair
KIT I3c
Contains tube of rubber cement, 12 sq. in. self- cure rubber, and 6 square patches.
] . Extension
Protects the chrome finish on bumpers, etc. Easy to install.
YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE TO BUY THE NEW
fire stone WAR TIRE
If your present tires cannot bo recapped, you may be eligible to buy the new Firestone War Tire. Come in and see it.
We'll Help You Fill Out Your Application
1
i
PROPORTIONATELY LOW
BY RIGID INSPECTION
If your present tires can be recapped, insist upon Firestone Factory Controlled Service. This strictly supervised service assures you of maximum mileage at no extra cost.
ir'KKV'S7.T.TS.SAVE TIRES AND GAS *. MAIL OR PHONE YOUR ORDER *, ir.'KKV'S7 Listen to the Voice of Firestone with Richard Crooks, Margaret Speaks and the Firestone Symphony Oreheitra, under direction of Alfred Wallentte-in, Monday cvcninun, oner N.B.C.
^ Su. 6=3075
320 Springfield Ave. Summit, N. J.
< ~'r-7 ?*?'
Personal Grudge Linked To Change Of Bus Termi
NEW PltOVlDKNCK —"Rumor persists," declare! ough Couucilman Herbert D. Tay- lor, ''that the personal grudge of Councilman Homo A. lietts of Sum- mit was a factor in causing Sum- mit's council last year to move the terminus of tiie New Providence Bus Company from the Summit Lackawanna Station to the north side of Broad street."
Councilman Taylor, 'ivffb is chair- man of the transportation commit- tee of the borough council, said he has received so many complaints from patrons of the line, hath from Summit and New Providence, that lie seriously questions what good lias come out of a change that •throws people out in all kinds of weather and causes them all kinds
CLASSIFIED ADS Will Be Found
On Page 6
of inconvenience. The transportation committee
head says people from Mountain avenue and Springfield avenue, Summit, as well as people from New Providence, had to stand in snow iij) to their knees la.it Thurs- day and Friday for the bus. ;
Mr. Taylor says the personal courtesy of Milse DeCorso, • owner of the bus line, was a. great factor Vj saving many patrons, especially i \ p e on Mountain avenue and Springfield from real discomforture lust week by his going out of the way to make sure they had trans- portation home on his best bus after others were crowded to. the limit and people still left standing on the curb.
The borough councilman says the Summit council changed the bus terminal without, even advising the
| borough council and without even informing the State Public Utility Commission. lie (Says that while Summit's council charged the change wan made because of con- gestion at the station, his studies have failed to show any substanti- ation of it, that where the New Providence buses used to come in, taxi cabs now clutter up the place.
PRISONER OF JAPS
(Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Raalie of Shadyskle avenue will return Sun- day from spending two weeks at the Trade Winds in Fort Lauder- dale, Fla. •
ANNOUNCEMENT The insurance business formerly carried on
by the late Robert J. Murphy will be con-
tinued by his wife under the name of The
Robert J. Murphy Agency, doing a general
business in Fire, Casualty, and Automobile
Insurance as representatives of the following
companies: * • •
Royal Indemnity Company
I'VT. ANTHOXY SOFIE Hurry Sofic of SOB Morris
avenue has Jiecii notified l>y the Wur Department that his -son, Private Anthony Sofus' with the Kugincer Corps, is a prison- er of war held'in the l'hiii])- l>ino Islands by the Japanese.
3Ir. Soiic lias two other sons in the Army: Michael, training in Texas for the Air Corps, and John, stationed on Stutcn Island.
Manser Property Destroyed By Fire; Save Valuable Stamps
NEW PUOVIDEXCK BOROUGH —Fire of an undertermined origin ou Tuesday afternoon destroyed most of the Otto C. Ilanser dwell- ing at 1011 Springfield avenue on the It. S. . Holt property. Considerable headway had been made l)y the blaze when the alarm was sounded at 3:20 p. m. Starting in the back of the 'building which was .built for a horse stable and carriage house, the flames abetted by a strong west wind quickly ate their way through to the roof.
In an attempt to head off the con- flagration from the cottage part, of the building, firemen strung a hose through tho cottage only to have some of the embers from the fire fall on the hose ami burn a hole through it. Difficulty was exper- ienced in extricating it.
An automobile and most of the furniture were moved to safety as was a valuable collection of stamps owned by Mr. Hansor together with a piano and a washing machine. Mrs. "Hanser was the only person in the building when tho fire was discovered." Fire officials declare the building is practically a total loss.
Dates to
Remember Feb. 5—Fri., S: 1.1 p. in. C. 0.
Show. Fireman's Flame. High School Auditorium.
Feb. -G-12—Boy Scout Week. Feb. 7 — lied Cross "Disaster"
Test. Feb. S—Mon.. Y. M. C. A. animal
meeting and dinner at (1:45 at "V\" Feb. 'J—Tues., 10 a. m. Town Im-
provement Association, c'ii Prosyect street.
Feb. 9—Tues., 8 p. m. Education meeting, Hamilton School.
Feb. 9—Tues., 8::iO p. m. Chris- tian Science Lecture. High School Auditorium. . F e b . 11 — Thurs. 8:15 p. in. Athenaeum. High School Audi- torium.
Feb. 10—Tues., 8:30 p. in. City- Budget Hearing. City Hall.
Feb. 18—Thurs., 0:30 p. m. An- nual Chamber of Commerce Din- ner. Beech wood Hotel.
Feb. 22-26— Mid-Winter Vacation of Summit Schools.!
Feb. 28—Red Cross Sunday.
SUMMIT DEFENSE
Surojslt-6-1253 .
j X<> l'HAlTICE I5LACKOLTS will jbe held by the State until after the juuvv air raid signals go into effect i i.s the subject of an announcement i received ihis week by tho Summit ;O0I) office fro.ni Leonard Drtyfuss, 1 Slate director of t:ie Office of Civ- | illu.ii Defense. . '
| Tho problem of how to advise the public that dagger has passed is giving.the Stale officials great con- cern. Pending a plan for the whole
Summit Women Will Hear Lecture On Effective Voting
The Summit League of Women Voters will devote its February meeting, (Monday at 1:30 p. m. at the Canfield, to a discussion of de- sirable election reforms in New Jersey. This .subject has long been in the platform of the State League.
Morris Schuitzer, co-author of the model election bill introduced in the Legislature in 1939, will speak on "How To Make Your Vote More Effective in New Jersey." Mrs. Edwin Bebout, state depart- ment chairman of the league, will discuss the revisions in New Jer- sey's primary election procedure needed to enable us to get better candidates.
i 'Mr. Schnitzer, a Newark attor- ney, advocates—as does the league —state-wide standardization of election procedure, vesting of the. responsibility for.honest elections In one State official and standard- ized qualifications, for all election board members.
The meeting'will be conducted •by the Department of Government and its operation in the local league, Miss Alice Splain, chair- man.
Stale, local councils are ordrreil not tu'makc any plans for soimdinr, an "all clear" following the suioaa blue warning.
During the period of actiuiuntiiif; Hie public with the new system, members of Ihe defense force.-: should uol relax their prepared- ness to be ready. If the siren sounds as the enemy may feel il Ls an op- portune time to. strike and capita- lize on the contusion Unit niin'nt result, if an alarm was sounded.
Miss Dorothy Kirsten finest Artist Tonight At High School
Dorothy Kirsten, chariniuK Amer- ican soprano who "woke up one morning to find she was fiiinnus,"' will come to Summit for a concert' this eveiiin;; at I be Summit llishj School under the auspices of the Summit Civic. Music Association.
Miss Klrstcn who was born in Montclair, from the age of fivoj showed great interest in music.' She was heartily encouraged in her! talent by her family—all of whom—l
Each issue of Tlio Summit Herald hits many pictures of local events ol interest; ana//wtmt.,; important people are doing.' '
V
FQ&yiCTORY V ;
EVERY AMERICAN
DOLLARS SAVED are patriotic dollars—ready-to go into War Bonds—Taxes—Contributions for the Fighting Man.
DOLLARS SAVED are ready to help you and yours in this emergency.
AND LOOKING AHEAD — DOLLARS SAVED and growing at interest will be on hand to buy the things you can't
buy today. ,
Open a Savings Account with us now. You can start with just a few dollars and, make them grow. !
e SUMMIT TRUST COMPANY E S T A B L I 5 H E D I 8 9 1 l
with the exception of bur father— are musicians.
Until 1!):!!), her life was pretty much that of the average American girl. In her leisure she appeared, on minor radio programs and, made a hit on tho amateur hour of a small New York .station. A Broad- way newspaper columnist, heaviriR her, arranged an audition with Grace Moore.
"That's the best youiiK voice f have heard in many, many years!" the great prima donna exclaimed, after hearing Miss Kirsten.
Miss KirsUm sailed for Europe in 1 March, 1!)39, to study a.H protege of I Miss Moore and returned after only six months' study because of the war situation. Her American con- cert, debut took place in .the sum- mer of 11)40 ut the Court; of Peace at the New; York World's Fair. In 1M2 she made her first New York operatic appearance and scored an immediate success in the title role of "La Boheme."
Must Sacrifice Today, Kay Tells Kiwanis
War-time responsibilities of Ki- wanis members were told to the Plainfield club Jan. 25 by William II. Kay of Summit,' Lieutenant Gov- ernor for the local ICiwanis district. Kiwanians, the club district offi- cial pointed out, should assume more responsibility toward their homes, the church, the country and toward men in service.
As a club and as individuals, Ki- Wiinians should sacrifice to support the war effort, M^...K;iy declared. "Xo sacrifice is too tfruat u> win the war," be pointed out, "We have our job to du."
During a war emergency, the speaker continued, the problem of keeping the home intact becomes tremendous. Juvenile delinquency rises, homes are broken up and it is the responsibility of the. individ- ual to help keep the home in its rightful place in the American scene. Both group and individual effort is required to curb the rise in delinquency. Such moves as curfews for younger children, nurs- eries and other such projects to curb the rise in delinquency are responsibilities of the individual, he emphasized.
BUY MORE VAIl BONDS.
Denies He Tried To Kill Brother
Appearing last week in the county court in Elizabeth, Edward Crom- well, 41), of 28-A Weaver street, denied that he tried to kill, his brother, Lawrence, ;J.7, same, ad- dress, witu a shotgun October last. He will he tried February 1U.
Advertising in the HERALD will pay you dividends.
We Are NOT Going Out Of Business
When our two sons went into the Navy and defense work respectively and help began to be scarce and with the restrictions placed on all businesses by the war the rumor started that we were closing for the duration.
This is UNTRUE. We shall continue to serve you
as always to the best of our ability].
This Week's Specials Sweet
DELIVERY ORDERS ACCEPTED DAILY
UNTIL 3 P. M.
Need
All Wen!, Nim'Je l!ro;i:.l»'il
n i i n o w n , I t ' l l , i i i u i f'-i
Economy and serviceability arc the hi;.; sell in j.; factors
in this good looking Huit. it 's impeccably tailored in
a sturdy, durable fabric that's known for long wearing
qualities.
Department.
opening for Sunday Dinner. We will serve
from 12 to 3 o'clock.
The same policy will prevail on Sundays as
on week'days, emphasizing a la carte service.
We will also serve table d'hote dinners.
The Canfield 333 SPRINGFIELD AVENUE
Daily Luncheons 11.30 to 2 Dinners 5.30 to 8
\ :
J t ^ ^
THE SUMMIT HERALD, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1943
SLIP COVERS (five your furniture longer life
Preserve the beauty of your furniture . . . add to the cheerfulness of your home, with gay slip-covers tailored to order in our workshop. We fit your furniture precisely . . . in your
' choice of materials.
SERVICES IN SUMMIT CHURCHES Oakes Memorial Methodist Church
i Central Presbyterian j Church
I Calvary Episcopal Church
Herrick B. Young Will Speak Here On Foreign Missions
7 Russell Place Rev. Frederick G. Willey. Minister Morning worship, 10:35 a. m.;'TCve-
' nlrig worship, 8 p. m.; Church school, l9:45-a. m.; Epwurth League meets at | 7 p. m, | Wednesday, 8 p. m,. Mid-week de- ] votional and song service.
| Rosary Shrine
Rosary Shrine Is located at the cor- ner of Morris and Springfield Avenues, Summit, N. J., just off Route 24, a, few blocks from the D., L. & W. Station. Bus 70 from the Newark Public Service Terminal stops at the doors.
First Church of Christ, Scientist
292 Springfield Ave. Sunday service at 11 a. m. Wednes-
day meeting at 8:15 p. m. Reading Room at 15 Maple street, open daily 12 to 4:30 n, m *>*oept Sundays and holidays. Sunday School 11 a. m.
(Corner Maple Street and Morris Avenue)
Dr. Leanard V. rtusehman, Minister! I Sunday, 9:45 a. m.. Church school I j for Junior, Intermediate and Senior ! Departments. Sessions for Beginners, : Kindergarten and Primary Depart- i me.nts begin at 11 a. m., Urns enabling j many parents to attend the c)iurt:h 1 service' during th,at hour. 11 a. m. morning worship.
Hospital Dressings and Red Cross Sewing' Groups are meeMng at the
I Parish House on every Tuesday, be- j j ginning at 10 n. in. iihd continuing un'il i ; 4 p. m. under the leadership of Mrs. IS. I t Allen.
Choir rehearsals for members of the Church School are to be conduct- ed as follows, under the leadership of Nellie (Jordon Dlasiu.s, organist. Wed- nesdays, at !i :•'!<) p. m. Junior Choir rehearsal; 4:15 p. m., Intermedia l» Girls; 5:00 p. m,, All Hoys' Choir.
(Woodland and DeForest Aves.) Rev. Walter 0. Kinsolving Rector
Sunday. S a in., Celebration of Ilie Holy foiniimni ' in ; 11 a. in , Sermon HN pas to r : !'::!<! a. in., Clmivli S rhml li :4i) |). 111., Yollnj: People's Kell-iwslnp meets it I parish house to H<> to Ih. t'••litrn 1 Vmith foune i l in.-.tins at tin Kent I'lnri ' uyinnitsiunt.
Olebnctions of the Holy Communion ire held every Thursday morning at 10 o'ol.i.k.
Methodist Church
(DeForeat Avenue and Kent Place lioulfivard)
Rev. O. C. Nelson, Tli.D,, Minister S u n d a y : -At 9:45 a . m . . Al l d e p a r t -
m e n t s o f t h e ' C h u r c h SchiMil ui lo a. m., A d u l t l i i l i le C l a s s . At 1 I a. in , X u r s e i y l o r s m ; t l r h i k l r i - n in P a r i s h H o u s e . At II :i. in. . H o l y <'• . i n n m n i m . At 7 p. in., Y o u t h ( "mnicil • 111 > • i • t i I ) t;. All y i u m ^ ]ico]iU' a r e i n v i i f d t o a l l f i i i l .
j Wallace Chapel \A.M.E. lion Church
i
Community Church
(Corner Waldron and Springfield Avenues)
Rev. A. Powell Davies, minister. Sunday, 11 a. m., regular service.
Department of Religious Education, 9:3C a. m. and 5:30 p. m,
Church of St. Teresa (Ilomaii Catholic) (Morris Avenue)
1 Rev. John V. Lenihan, Pastor I Sunday: .Masses at ti, 7, 8, 9, 10 and
11 :30 «. in. Tuesday, Miraculous Modal NYivena
at 3:15 and 8 p. in. Friday: Devotions in honor of tlifi
Scored Heart at 8 i>. m. for the wel- fare of the men of St. Teresa's who are. serving their country.
Saturday: Confessions from :>:i!l) until C p. in. and from 7 :!!0 until 9 p. m.
Rev. Florence Randolph, Minister (140 Broad Street)
Sunday, 11 a. in., regular morning worship service. ICvenlng service at 8 p. m. Sunday School assembles at 3 p. m. Young People's hour at 7 r in.
First Baptist Church
Rev. David K. Barnwcll, Minister Church School : Junior High .School,
9:110 u. in.; .Senior High School, (1:45 a. m.; Beginners, Primary and Kle- mehtury Grades, 11 it. m.; Church service at 11 a. rn. : Women's sew- ing every Tuesday, 10 a. m. to 4 p. in.
Society of Friends
Meet each Sunday at 10:15 a. m. at the i'. W. C. A.
Rabbi Jacob S. Cohen (fi7 Kent Place Boulevard)
Friday evening services will take place at S i>. in.
Sunday School classes between 10 a. m. ,'1111] \'l noun. Hebrew classes are in se.ssion on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday between 3 and (1 p. m.
St. John's Lutheran Church
and Beech wood Road) Bible School, 9:45 a. m. ; worship,
10::;0 a. in.
First Lutheran Church Rev. Alfred A. Fant, Pastor
Sunday Sclmiil and Bible. Class meet at 111 a. in.; uinrniiiiv worship at 11 a. in.. Swedish service first Sunday of every month at II :W p. m.
r
. Summit, New Jersey cordially invites you to a
Free Lecture On ,9
WILLIAM D. KILPATRICK, C.S.B. of Detroit, ^Michigan
Member of the Bonn] of Lectureship of the Mother Church, The First Church of ("lirist., Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
in I he
A RELIGIOUS EDITORIAL ~\ TO SHOW PRIZE FILMS
J
Herrick B. Young' was i'rom 19L'f,-,'!5 a Presbyter ian •missionary, serving as a ineinbui' of the fatuity of Alboi'it College, Teheran, Iran. IIin IUI'IOUKII WHS then txf ended to direct the Centennial celebration of tlie Roani of Foreign Missions of wliicli he wns elCrtwl ;m t'xciatlivp secretary of lite Hunrd with Kpecial rospniiHibility for missionary per- sonnel .
In 1!!.'!!) in connection with the Board's Second Century Deputa- tions to Chile and Brazil. Herrick Young made an extended triji lo Soutli America, followed in l!l-12 >l>y •HI administrat ive trip to the Col- ombia and Venezuela Missions. A frequent contributor to Hie religi- ous and secular press, lie is the au tho r of "lleinisphcrG Neighbors," "One Great I'Vllowsliip," "Moslem
Editors Say." and "Islam Awak- ens."
i As a trustee of Iktugclnw Col- i'lesp In China rtml Albirz ('allege in ! Iran, and a member of the execu- • live coinmittee oi tile SimUui Vol- i unteer Movoinm' and tiie special 'co 'umittee tin Christian Hccon-
slniction of the National lalercol- leKiate Christian Council, his con- t .u t 'w i tb the stu;l>'iil I'U-ld in intcr- nationa! emu'.ttiiHi is con-Uniit and u t d ,
At 11 o'clock, on Stun!.iy morn- ing. February 11. Mr. YO'.UIK will spiak in Central i^rcsbyuTian Church. *s
Church Service i The Rev. \V. S. llininan, pastor of
St. .John's Lutheran Church, will speak Sunday on "Tliv Kesounvs of Kaitii." Oi'Kan .u u ID hers will he
. "Berceuse," Kinder; Adagio, Spohr; anil i'oslltide, Klauss. The choir will siti^ ' I n Kaiih I Calmly Rest."
In Hill the United Slates spent ifi:!,S00,O00,(HM), [or (!ei'»)iae.. Inl!M2, $.12,.100,000,0(10 was spout for war.
Weekly Program At Methodist Church
All sewing groups will be discon- tinued until after the conversion of the heating system.
Monday, S p. m.—Meeting of the .Official Hoard at the Parsonage.
Tuesday, All-day- meeting of the Woman's Society of Christian Serv- ice. ll:'ii) a. in. Husiness meeting; 1 [). m. I.uiieluon in be served by (!roti|i 2. 2 p. in.—Devotions to he led by Rev. J. E. Hamilton. The af- ternoon program will consist of a sketch with several members of the society participating.
Tuesday. S p. m.—Meciing of the Couples' Club in the Parish House.
TfiLP YOUR RED CROSS
Guropractic /or HcaliK
KNOW THIS TRUTH:
All that Chiropractic lias done for others' health improvement, may be duplicated for you. All lo whom Chiropractic has brought regained health, are symbols of hopefulness for you who may have become dis- couraged. "Do not give up. Look Chiropractic up--here today.
DR. R. J. OWENS, Chiropractor Bassett Building
38ii Springfield Ave. Su. (i-:t:tT2 Summit, N. J.
IT
.-First Church of Christ, Scientist Summit, New Jersey
A BRANCH OF THE MOTHER CHURCH, THE FIRST CHURCH Or CHRIST, SCIENTIST, IN BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Sunday Services at 11 A M. Sunday School 11:00 A. M. Wednesday Meeting at 8.15 P. M.-'
Christian Science Reading Room FHEE TO THE PUBLIC
15 MAPLE STREET Open, dally 12 to 4:30, except Sundays and holidays; also Monday
evenings 7:30 to 9: SO and after the -Wednesday meeting Literature on Christian Science may be read, borrowed or purchased
L ,
THE VICTORIOUS CHURCH One of the questions often asked about Christianity is how
it has survived the centuries. The conquests of Christianity at critical epochs in history seem like marvels of romance rather than records of sober fact. A little band of disciples of a cruci- fied carpenter from an obscure town inaugurated a missionary movement which in less than three centuries conquered the Roman Empire. Slowly but surely the believers in the way of life Jesus taught have been,marching victoriously down through the centuries. Being promoted by human beings, the Church j has been subject to human frailties, and consequently has suf- fered some reverses. But, after nineteen centuries no one can look upon its record without exclaiming, "Marvels of Conquest."
The Church has been in the habit of undertaking the im- possible. This should help us to form the conviction that a new conquest more significant than any that has been made-in former crises can be achieved in our own time. We are waiting for a new world to emerge out of the crucible. Fires have been testing it. As an early un-named Christian writer calmly de- j . rt u -i p i i • clared when looking out on the turmoil and upheaval of his day,' tOUpieS UUD TO Entertain "the things which are being shaken are obviously things which Tuesday Evening, Feb. 9 can be shaken. They are being removed out of the way so that the things which cannot be shaken may remain." We of the Churches are both willing and anxious to be purified of our dross. We know it is possible for us to triumph in battles and win this war, but that if "we the peoples of the Democracies are morally superior we will not really be victorious. God's way is the triumph of Right. It will not be enough for us to be an arsenal for Democracy. Our invincible re-inforcement will be our faith j Joseph J. Harley of Canoe Brook in a just cause, a just God, the eventual triumph of RIGHT.
O. C. NELSON, Pastor, Methodist Church of Summit.
J0SK1UI. ,1. HAIILIIY
The Couples Club of the1 Methn- (ijst Church,'Of which Mr. and .Mrs. Robert. Hrannan are presidents, will entertain inember.s and friends at a program of movies and music Tuesday evening, February 0, at 8:15 p. m. in the Parish House.
Summit Poet's Work Set to Music as Hymn
Grant Colfax Tullar, 134 Morris avenue, is the author of two poems appearing in the February issue of
2 9 Deecnwooa Koad
uneral Ui rectors
PUne Sum. 6-0218
Call The Summit Herald Office For Job Printing Summit 6=1900
Moody Monthly: Wilt, 0 Lord!"
"Ask What Thou and "Not Now."
The words has been set to music by George C. Stebbins, the well- known hymn writer, who is now in his ninety-seventh year.
Auxiliary Meets
Women's Society Has Open Meeting .
The evening meeting of the Women's Society under the lead- ship of Mrs. Chas. H. Beek will be held Wednesday, February 17, at 8 p. m. at the iPresbyterian Parish House with Dr. Luther E. Stein as speaker. Dr," Stein is connected with the Board of Christian Educa- tion and is chairman of Church Re- lations. This meeting is open to men and women.
parkway, will show his movie, ''Auntie in Moccassins," which was rated among the top ten in the International .Amateur Cinema Lea-
igue in 1042. Mrs. Eleanor S. Jahn I will play selections from Rach- i nianinoff and Dett. ! Mr. • Hurley's second picture, j "Land of My Dreams," which won j first place in the Metropolitan j Amateur Motion Picture Club [his year, will bo shown and Alfred J. Jahn will conclude the program by playing- musical selections by Cho- pin, Bach, Schubert and Debussy. Mr.' and Mrs. Allison H. Hern of Tulip street are in charge of ar- rangements for the evening's enter- tainment. .
Additional (Ilinrcli News on Page 5.
The Auxiliary of St. John's Ltith-i eran Church will meet at the homej of Mrs. Nils Sward, 08 Tulip street,] Friday night.
ESTABLISHED 1880
Agency in Sunimii 'Phone Snmmlt 6-0037
Eugene C. Pierson Opposite Depot, Summit, N. J. ,
Consult a; Realtor
7oRelievf Mhtrgot
GOOD LENSES poorly ground never yet made a good pair of glasses. Here at Deuchler's you
-may be certain of grade "A" Lenses . . . accurate grinding and skillful fitting . . . Ask your doctor!
An nutlioritatli't! booklet on tlwrnre nf eyes iind names of Hyp physi- cians in this vicinity will be sent upon requi'st.
'.CVeucSfer
641 Main Street East Orangre, N. J.
PROSPECT PHARMACY 1883 Springfitkd Ave. Maplewood, N. J.
\ ANNOUNCEMENT FEBRUARY DRUG SALE NOW ON
Drugs — Drug Sundries — Vitamins —Cosmetics — Baby Foods and Supplies Sodas — Candies — Tobaccos
Two Registered Pharmacists arc ready to servo you daily from S A. M. to 10 V. M. Brills •' Vnr morn than 20 years
' thousands of people in ami ulioiii dProacnpt.oim
to be Filled Here
T>T>T7(C</^>'T> TTVTvI/~VrVTCl
FRlillSCRlr 1 IONS have had I heir prescriri- lions filled hero.
5 FREE Pencil and Eraser Coupon FREE ; Any Man, W'oiiiiin or Child may present (liis iree pencil coupon at the Prospect l'lianmicy, J| 18NS Springfield Ave, Maplc-wffotl, N. .]. anil receive free of rlinrgc an excellent Pencil and • Kraser. It is not necessary to linike a purcliiise nlien redeeming Iliis coupon, nor it is (riven 5 in eonsidejiition of any ])iireliase. Only one coupon can be redeemed Ity one person. This coupon 5 is void after rVlirusiry 28, UMJJ. ^
FREE Pencil and Eraser Coupon FREE j M B B t E B B B H B B • • • • • • • • • • D U B • • B IBtIBIBBIBBIBiaB•••llBIBHBiaiiaHHBaP
FEBRUARY DRUG SALE NOW ON PROSPECT PHARMACY
1883 Springfield Ave. Maplewood, N. J.





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Will keep your appliances operating efficiently
As a wartime necessity, your Government is asking you to keep your gas and electric appliances operating at top- notch efficiency. Only in that way can you conserve gas and electricity, food, man-hours and materiafs so vitally needed to win this war.
Have your appliances inspected regularly by your dealer or plumber. He can put your appliances in the most effi- cient operating condition and help avoid breakdown now that new appliances may not be available.
If your appliances cannot be repaired, we will try to help you. From our limited stocks we are trying to allocate new
' appliances to those who need them most.
: JERSEY CENTRAL POWER & LIGHT CO. • - .
JL. E A C H S T A R R E P R E S E N T S O N E O F O U R M E N I N T H E A R M E D S E R V I C E S
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Presbyterian Church Weekly Schedule
Monday, 10 a. m.—Red Cross Sewing under the leadership of! Mrs. K. R. Allen. >
Tuesday, 2:30 p. m.—Meeting o£ the Parish Guild under the leader- ship of Mrs. Roland Guilford. 8 1). m.—Meeting of the Scratch Club tinder the leadership of 'Philip JCreider, at the home of Miss Elea- nor Bailey 9fi Lamed road. Wednesday, 8 p. in.—Mid-week
Service conducted by Dr. Busch- man. The program will consist of meditation and prayers for peace and for the men in service. 2 p. m.—Meeting of the Wednesday Afternoon Club under the leader- ship of Mrs. H. G. Pa£f. A Jiursery for little people is avail- able during the meeting hours for those desiring to leave their chil- dren.
Friday, 8 p. m.—Meeting of the Fellowship at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins Jordan, 14 Shadyside avenue.
Woman's Society Will Give Sketch
The Woman's Society of Christian Service of the Methodist Church will have its monthly meeting Tuesday, February 9 in the parish house. The president, Mrs. F. A. Doughty win open the business meeting at 11:30 a. m. Luncheon will be served at 1 o'clock by Mrs. J. A. Stout and Mrs. W. M. Beau- mont and their group.
.The Rev. J. E. Hamilton, former- ly i of. Summit, now pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Nyack, N. Y., will lead the devotions at 2 o'clock. The program will concern the Literature-Department of wjiich Mrs. Noel Bebout is chairman, and a sketch, "The' Methodist Woman Speaks" will be presented by seven members of the society.
Church Observes Young People's Day
At the morning service at 11 o'clock at the Central Presbyterian Church, the minister, Dr. Leonard V. Buschman, will have for his ser- mon topic, "The Lion in the Snow."
Boy Scout Sunday, and Young People's • Day, will be observed at this service with musical selections by the Junior Choir. Members of the Young People's League will attend in a body the Youth Council Meeting at the Kent Place School Gymnasium at 7 p. m. The program for the evening will consist of a discussion in panel lor-m on "Youth's Work in Tonior- rojvJH World" 'by Community Lead- ers. The student leader will be Patricia Van Ameringen.
"Lourdes Novena" At Rosary Shrine
The Sunday Holy Hour at 3:40 p. m., February 7, will.be. dedicated to Our Lady of LoirPdes whose feast is celebrated on the eleventh of this month. The solemn novena pray- ers will be conducted by the Rev. C. G. Moore, O.P., J.C.B., after th# special prayers for victory and a just peace. Each decade of tlifc Rosary will he preceded by a |>ai;i of the famous Lourdes hymn, to be sung by all taking part in the devo- tions.
All Rosarians are Invited to at- tend the Holy Hour as a filial trib- ute to Our Lady who said the Rosary j with Bernadette in the Grotto of Lourdes. Many indul- gences may be gained by Itosariaiis on the first Sunday of the month.
During the month of February, Catholic press month, relatives and friends are urged to-renew sub- scriptions for their loved ones in service. Good books and papers are most valuable in sustuiniiiK th« morale of our nrme4,,iui'cu.s.
2:30 p. m. on Monday, February S. Members of the Women's Society of the New Providence Methodist I Church will conduct the Devotions. I Mrs. Louis Day will review tlnee ehi'titfra of the s.udy book, "On This Foundation" by W. S Ilycrof:.
Lesscn=Sermon
Retired Minister Speaks At Summit Churches
The Rev. W. S. Coeyman, of Divi- sion avenue, retired iMethodist min- ister, spoke at the Zion Methodist Church Sunday, January 31, and at the Fountain Baptist Church Jan- uary 24. His sermon topic each time, was, "The Body Is The' Tetn-, pie of the Holy Spirit." Mr. Coey- man was twice the, 'minister at Oakes Memorial Church in Summit.
Mission Study Group Will Meet Monday
Members of the Women's So- ciety of Presbyterian Church will attend the Interdenominational Mission Study Group meeting at
"Spirit" is the Lesson-Sermon j subject for Sunday, Kebmiary 7, in! all Christian Science Churches an I j Societies throughout the world.
The Golden Text is: '-Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, salth the Lord of hosts." (Zech. 4; 6).
Among the Lesson-.Sermon cita- tions is the following from the Bible: "The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God:" (Rom. 8:1C).
'The Lesson-Sermon also includes the following passage from the Christia? Science textbook, "Sci- ence and Health with Key to the Scriptures" by Mary--Baker Eddy: "0(Ml anil man are not the same, but in the order of divine Science, Go-d and man coexisf'and are eter- nal. God is the parent Mind, anil •man is God's spiritual, offspring." (p. 336).
Church Guild Speaker Beauty Clinic Expert
The Friday Guild'of the First Baptist Church will meet Febru- ary 5 at 1 p. m. for a dessert lunch- eon at the home of Mrs. 0. T. Koh- nian of 133 Ashland road. The series of discussions on the subject of making war time adjustments to ordinary personal and community problems will be continued. Miss Ingrid Hallen of the Beauty Clinic of Good Housekeeping magazine will be the speaker. >«Her subject will be, "Practical Good Looks on War Time Budgets."
Your Radio is Precious . . . Keep It In Good Repair!
You depend upon your radio more and more these stay-at- home evenings. Our staff of trained electricians are factory equipped to service your radio regardless of what is wrong. Don't wait—it may be too late!
15 Years of Service Open Evenings to 7:30
ROSS RADIO SERVICE 97 Summit Avenue Summit 6-1065
s ; • *
nisi y understand...
A MESSAGE FROM THOSE WHO MAKE AND WE WHO SELL
AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS FOOTWEAR
The President of the United States has asked that the name, "Red Cross",
be discontinued in connection with any commercial product.
Red Cross Shoes, as you know, have borne this proud name for over
50 years. In Summit we have sold them as Red Cross Shoea for over 12
years.
However, Nee Dell Red Cross Shoe Stores are proud to join with the
makers of this famous footwear in acceding, during this critical war period,
to the wishes of our President. ,
•This Spring, therefore, Red Cross S'.ioes will be known as Gold Cross
Shoea. You will find them advertised as Gold Cross Shoes. You'll find
them, as rapidly as possible, so labeled and marked in our store.
Gold Cross Shoe3 will . i . and are being . . . made by the same people
who made Red Cross Shoes. They: will be made over the same "Limit' La&ts
in the same great factories. Actually, Gold Cross Shoes are Red Cross Shoes.
GOLD CROSS SHOES. . . FAMOUS FOR
OVER 50 YEARS AS RED CROSS SHOES
\
88 Speedwell Avt>.
Iliili
ordeals when) as a department store, we
had to exert all the enterprise, ingenuity
and fortitude at our. command, to prevent
the breakdown of an essential inechanism of
the community.^These ordeals were the War
of 1898; the Panic of 1907; the First World
War; the Depression of. 1921; and;the
Depression of 1932\
of scarcity, of curtailed production, of pri-
ority"freezing"Jiou>/we can* offer yon «
storewide sale involving such a wide selection
of merchandise at such considerable savings. • - / - • • . _ . . . • * ,
The fact is, of course,'that scarcity exists hf
categories,and that through jore-
to maintain our assortments, or obtain satis-
factory substitutes where necessary. Today
the value of an article is measured not only
by its price but by its availability.
WE ARE not particularly troubled by this
new ordeal. We feel sure that together with
the whole country we'll come out of it with
renewed vigor. As to the fortitude and enter'
prise required of us, we think we have a
pretty good cushion to fall hack on. The
test as always will be to provide you with
what you want when you want it — to see.
that you gel the best things thai American
industry can produce. For it in these things
that carry with them the promise of a better
life for all.
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IS NOW IN L. BAM BERG ER & CO. "ONE OF AMERICA'S GREAT STORES"" NEWARK, N. J.
*Kc|. 0. 0. P»t- Oft.
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
KEAL ESTATE FOR SALE HOUSES TOR
VJlLY houses In BaskhiK ff, 5 rooms and bath downstairs,
3 rooiha and bath upstairs. $600 In- come year. Separate electric and water meters, hot water heat, ther- mostat conLrol, coal In cellar. Lower floor held vacant and priced, for quick sale. Write. McOroiirty, ScwelJ, New Jersey.
»8,GO0 NEW colonial home, six cross ventil-
ated looms, first floor, livlns room, fireplace, puoHt do«pt, dining room, powder room, modern science kitchen, second floor, 3 bedrooms (twin size), nm|>lo closets, tilo hath, shower, at- tached garage, large lot, low taxes, ?55 monthly carrying charge.
THOMAS IS; MUNROK 15 Becchwood Road Summit, N. J .
Su. 6-1016
MODERN G-room house in Plainfield, excellent locution, exchange for house in Summit, h, M. Saltow, 711 Pjuiniorton Ave., Plainfield. S4-3G
Franklin school section, four bed- rooms, one bath, stoker coal steam heat, immediate occupancy, easily fi- nanced.
$13,000 Modern Dutch colonial, Glen Oaks
section, center hall, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, lavatory, pine panelled nrenk- fant room, pine panelled recreation room, a i r conditioned, 2-car attached gilrittR, rnnny larpe oak trees.
EDWARD A. BUTLER, Realtor 96 Summit Ave. Summit!, N. X
Su. 6-C04O Opon every day—Evenings hy
appointment.
Apartments" Summit, New Jersey
A few choice apartments available. Elmer Rinliart & Co. Su. C-0058
24tf MADISON—3-room unfurnished ap t .
3r(£ floor, iiulet private home, resi- dential section. Convenient to train, bus ami stores. Suitable for 2 adults. Automatic coal heat. Call Madison jG-0380-.T. 33-34
THREE-KOOM and bath with heat, open fireplace. First floor. Inquire at 10 Kent Place Blvd.
31& ROOMS and bath in modern apart- ment house, near Summit. Rent $65. Available' Feb. 15. Also i'A rooms and bath, rent $75. Available May 1st.
A. S. ANDERSON, Realtor 332 Springfield Ave. Summit C-3123
FOUR-ROOM, tile bath, heat and wa- ter furnished. $38. Murray Hill, Su. G-468S-M. • 34-tf.
SIX rooms, heat and water furnished. 50 Summit. Ave. Call Su. (i-3880 be- tween 10-5 p. in. 34-tf
AJ modern 5-romn apartment, Mteaiu heat Included. Janitor service. Phone Summit 0-211)0.
MODERN colonial, i bedrooms, tiln bath, first floor lavatory, scroened porch, attached (jarage, convenient to transportation. Franklin School section. Price $9,500,
A. S, ANDERSON, Realtor 332 Springfield A.vo. Summit, N. J.
Su. 6-3123
15 TAEWELLYN Hd., Summit—8 room IIOUBO •with coal stoker, frontage of
, lot 165 feet—depth 235 ft. Owner will entertain reasonable offer. For Inspection call Su. 6-4433.
HOW TO COPE WITH HIGH INCOME TAXES
AND < INFLATION
A PRACTICAL SUGGESTION
FOK SAJJB AT FRACTION'OF COST, FOR DELIVERY MAY 1, MODERN TUDOR HOME COSTING $125,000, IN HIGHLY RESTRICT- ED RESIDENTIAL S E C T I O N "WITHIN SEVEN MINUTES WALK OF RAILWAY STATION AND SHOPPING DISTRICT IN SUM- MIT, N. J., AND YET, SEEMING- LY, MILES IN COUNTRY, OWING TfO ARTISTIC LANDSCAPING AND WOODED SURROUNDINGS. LUXURIOUS BEDROOMS, BATHS, CLOSETS, OAK-PANELLED TU- DOR LIVING ROOM, GEORGIAN DINING HOOM, ETC. NOTHING OMITTED. MIGHT LEASE WITH OPTION.
A PURCHASER, BY DEDUCT- ING. TAXES, AND INTEREST ON MORTGAGE WHICH OWNER (OR ESTATE) WILL ACCEPT, FROM A - $25,000 INCOME, CAN SAVE FROM $2,000 TO $2,5.00 IN HIS AN- NUAL. INCOME TAX WHICH HE CAN'T DO AS A TENANT. ALSO, BY INVESTING IN PRODUCTIVE REAL ESTATE HE CAN HEDGE AGAINST ALMOST CERTAIN IN- FLATION. BROKERS PROTECy- BD. TELEPHONE SUMMIT 6-0363.
REAL ESTATE POR RENT HOUSES B E S T
SIX rooms and batlu 53 Beuuvoir Ave. Call Summit C-1389-W.
UNFURNISHED home, for the dur- ation, built 1941, 3 bedrooms!, 2 baths, lavatory. $110. EDWARD A. BUTLER, Realtor
06 Summit Ave. Summit, K. J. su. e-eo-ro
Open every day—Evenings by i appointment.
BEAUTIFULLY" furnished home in desirable section. Gas heat, air conditioned, 3 bedrooms—to May 1st, 1943. %YS> per month. EDWARD A. BUTLKR, Realtor
90'Summit Ave. Summit, N. J. Su. 0-C04O
Open every .day—Evenings by appointment- • • :
~" FOR -R15NT Attractive Coloninl • Bunealow-Uv-
Inf room, dining room, kitchen, two bedrocma, tiled bath, open screened pbrch. ono-car Rarasro, recreation room, conditioned air heat wtlh oil, complete insulation and storm sash. Convenient to bus ana' 'station; .Rental 180.00.
• March 1st. MOUNTAIN, •V7HITM0KK
& JOHNSON 85 Summit Avenue Summit G-1WM
FURNISHED ROOMS TURKEY HILL COTTAGE—Exclusive
home for exclusive people. Boom and board. Dining room open to the public. T3 Beechwood*- Rd., B.u. 6-306B. 20-tf
PLEASANT room with steady warmth. 196 Summit Ave., Su. 8-2242. 16-tf
FURNISHl^D ROOMS—Convenient to bus and town. 7 Tulip Street. Su. 6-0128-J. 25-tf
TA1U3YTON' 110liMi, soutti-eant fur- nished run in with iirivnte both for bimlness person or tiuslnrs.s couple. 18R Summit Ave. Su. 8-136! 2Dtf
TH'B DE BAR.Y, pleasant comfortable single or double rooms, with board. Kxcellcnt meals. 265 Springfield Ave, Tel. Summit 6-6059. 20-tf.
ONE or two rooms for rent, private bath, plenty ot coal heat. Call Su. 6-0907-J. 30-tf.
FURNISHED single room, private apartment, man preferred, 5 min- utes to station. Su. 6-1580-B 32-tf
ONE large front bedroom. Murphy JBldg-., 487 Springfield Ave., Summit.
30-31
FURNISHED room, 20 Clark Street, Summit. "Woman preferred 30-tf.
SINGLE or double room, garage, pri- vate family, coal heat. Su. 6-1564-M.
SINC1L13, furnished room, quiet resi- dential section, few minutes from center of town. 15 Franklin Place.
CLEAN, sunny room; central. Busi- ness person or nurse preferred. Sum- mit 6-2267-M.
SINGLE room, next to bath, steam heat, centrally located. Call after 4 p. m. Su. 6-6277.-M..
THE EUCLID, 18 Euclid Ave. Attrac- tive, furnished single room, .southern exposure, running water, bath ad- joining. Ideal location, 4 mins. to train or bus. Hu. 6-0140. 30-tt.
ROOM AND BOARD WANTED
WANTI5D, by school teacher,' room and board with three meals In warm home, near station. Will pay ?).O. Box 32. u(<> Herald. •
BOARDERS WANTED NURSE would like elderly lady, semi-
invalid or senile. Nice sunny room. Steam heat. Best food. Diet If necessary. Terms reasonable. Sum- mit 6-4305-W.
FOR SALE NEW and used Sewing Machines,
many kinds. Doyle Sewing Machine Store, 480 Springfield Ave., Summit 6-2934. 31-tE
VERY choice Holstein •'Dairy heifers $20 each. Non-related bull frne with 5 head. Best of blending. HOME-
'-.STJSAD FARMS, McGraw, N. Y. R. No. 2. ' • •' 33-37
BEAUTIFITI, ten-pleee walnut dining room suite. Excellent condition, $40. Call Chatham ,4-2414. ,
HELP WANTED CbtTPJJlOS, copks, general maids,'Chil-
dren's nurses, farmers^milkers, good pay, for help or employment. New- mark's Agency, 20 Washington St., Mprriatown 4-3698. • 31-tf
MEN—Machinist, lathe, planer, milling machine, and radial drill press oper- ators. Must be experienced. Gpod •wages and working conditions on war work with excellent chance or employment after war on our manu- facturing; line. Pulverizing Machin- ery Co., River Rd. and Chatham U<1.
19-tf,
FOTlllENT in Morrlstown, 3!>00 su. ft. in the center of town. Will make
- reasonable alterations, Consult C. J. Kylle Myers, Realtor, 8 Community Place, telephone Mo. 4-3880. Brokers protected. .
APARTMENTS WANTED MODERN three-room apartment In
desirable location: large living room. Box: 16, % Herald •, 2.5tf
FURNISHED APTS. TWO-HOOM apartment Adults only.
256 Springfield Ave., Summit. 32tf
APARTMENTS TQ LET T H R E E room apartment, business
> person or couple, no children. Heat, gsi and water furnished. Reasonable. Su, 6-1788-W.
FOUR rooms, tile bath, heat and wa- ter furnished. Floral Avenue, Mur- ray Hill. Summit 6-4683-M. 30-tf.
TWREE-ltOOM apar tment Apply sec- ond floor, 215 Morris Ave. 32-tf
GOOD worker, full or part time, small six-room house, neat, nice person- ality, refined, domestic, cook, clean. Blrs. Shea, li'J Blackburn Place,
• Summit. ' . SHE I
Avoid Traveling Long Distances in Snow or Sleet
Aircraft Experimental, Tool and Die Work ,
Factory Conveniently Located "Top Rates
Excellent Working Conditions
HELP WANTED BOOKKEEPER, typist, apply P. O.
Box 239, stating, age and experience.
BOOKKEEPER for. small concern, middle age or draft exempt. Write Box 612, Springfield, N. J., statins age, qualifications, salary expected.
LAUNDRY to do at home. Call Su. 6-3923-J. . . . 33-34
PRACTICAL 4-4S61-J.
NURSE. CHATHAM
ARE AVAILABLE FOR
E X P E R I E N C E D
T E L E P H O N E O P E R A T O R S
LOCAL OR LONG DISTANCE
Apply any day frem 9 A. M. to 5:30 P.M.
Saturday 9 A. M. to 1 P. M.
N. J. BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY
ROOM 90S
540 BROAD STREET, NEWARK
BANK BOOK No. 23328. Payment has been stopped. Finder call at Sum mlt Trust Co. . 33-34
.SAVINGS BOOK No, 7788. Call a t I Citizens Trust Co. 33-34
TWO bank bonks No. U01!) and No. 11G44. Return to Citizens Trust Co,
34-35
I ANTIQUE topaz brooch, Sat. on | Springfield Ave. Reward. Mrs, | Eliott Averett, Dixie, Dalo Farm, i Chatham. .
j EXTRA heavy skid chains, extra cross links at sides. Lost between Cliiit bam center and 14 Franklin Place, Finder notify ••Mr.. Thompson, 14 Franklin Place, Summit. ?
SILVER FOX CAPE, lost Sunday, Jan. 24 around Summit, Whittrldge and Waldron Avenues. Call. Su. 6-2288.-
LOST—C Ganollno book, F433G04 B2; Illinois license 934711. Call Summit G-O385-J.
FOUND FOUND—Largo sterling liipol pin, white stones; found .Ian. 13 in Lincoln
School Music Dcpt. Su. 0-113:14.
"WANTED TO BUY
SEDAN, G 'cylinder car, Into model, from private owner. Call between
.7 and 8,p. m. Su. G-434G-VV.
GIRL wanted us murker and sorter in dry cleaning store. B. 1,. Si-hlussur, 37 Union Place. Ku. G, 132.
YOUNG LADY to work in local dry cleaning store, steady position, ex- cellent* pay. i Liberty Cleaners & Dyers, Summit 6-01)01. .
PRF.SSER, malo, to do rough anil silk work. Liberty Cleaners & Dyers, Summit 6-0901. ' ' .
GIRL for Koneral housework from 12 noon. Two in family. Small house near station. Light work: Uood wages. Summit G-4OO4'-W.
HANDY-MAN, can be past middle- age, room, hoard, and small salary. 25G Springfield Ave., Summit.
WAITRESS wsinloil. Applv a t the Blue Twintoi-irTea Room, Springfield Ave. and Boulevard.
WAITRESS for pleasant part-time work In local plant Call Su; 6-3938.
GIRLS WANTED TO OPERATE SINGER
SEWING MACHINES STEADY EMPLOYMENT
Bruce Manufacturing Co. Industrial Place Summit, N. J.
SIX MEN wanted between I8- 60 to work Thursday morn- ings, 3' a. rn. to 7 a. m;, preV paring Summit Heralds for mailing and delivery. Apply Sat. morning 10-12 a. m. Ask for Mr. Carter;
WOMAN for cleaning one day weekly. Bus to within one block of house. Summit G-1663.
OREA'l' ATLANTIC & PACIFIC
Femalu
You win help your own neigh- borhood A. & P. Footl. Store to better serve the community with flno foods. - •
Work near your own home, It's most convenient, No great distance to travel to and from work, thus saving time