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1 REPORT OF THE STUDY GROUP ON ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT Findings and Recommendations City University of New York Office of Academic Affairs May 2013 FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY

REPORT OF THE STUDY GROUP ON ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT … · Appendix B, CUNY Advisement Staffing and College Profile, provides each campus’s number of students, number of advisors,

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REPORT OF THE STUDY GROUP ON ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

Findings and Recommendations

City University of New York Office of Academic Affairs

May 2013

FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY

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Table of Contents

Background 2 OAA Advisement Study Group Findings 4 Advisement Staffing and Services 5 The Role of Faculty 6 The Role of Technology 7 Assessing Advisement Programs 8 CUNY Core Advisement Learning Outcomes and Opportunities 8 Recommendations 9 Appendices 12 Appendix A: Academic Advisement Study Group Members 12 Appendix B: CUNY Advisement Staffing Appendix C: CUNY Select Student Services Staffing and Role in Academic Advisement 19 Appendix D: CUNY Faculty Advisement Policies 21 Appendix E: CUNY Faculty Role in Advising 25 Appendix F: CUNY Core Advisement Learning Outcomes and Opportunities 31

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Background As part of the 2011-2012 Office of Academic Affairs (OAA) work plan, Executive Vice Chancellor Logue charged University Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Frank Sanchez, University Dean for Undergraduate Studies Karrin Wilks, and University Associate Dean for Student Success Initiatives and Executive Director for Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) Donna Linderman with developing a strategy to analyze current academic advising services and resources, and to make recommendations for improving academic advising across CUNY. Two OAA study groups undertook this charge: one led by Vice Chancellor Sanchez to explore early alert and call center models, and one led by Dean Wilks and Director Linderman to explore academic advising models. The OAA Advisement Study Group was established in fall 2011 with cross-campus and cross-departmental representation from academic affairs, student affairs, professional advisors and faculty (see Appendix A: Academic Advisement Study Group Members). The Study Group was charged with making recommendations for improving student advisement for students with fewer and more than 30 accumulated credits, and more specifically to:

1. Review the findings from the Graduate NYC! Advisor Survey and Catalogue of CUNY Advisement Models and Practices.

2. Analyze advising models currently in place and those in development, both inside and outside CUNY, including for:

- new/ incoming students (including pre-admission activities), - general education course-taking (related to Pathways), - first-year students, - second-year students, - academically at-risk students, - students in special programs, - students intending to transfer, - the use of peer mentors, - the use of technology to assist advising, - community college students vs. senior college students,

- students in particular majors (including pre-professional and liberal arts) - students nearing graduation.

3. Collect and analyze information about how advising systems are evaluated both inside and outside CUNY.

4. Collect and analyze data on current staffing resources allocated to academic advising.

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The Study Group met six times between January and June 2012, including two meetings facilitated by National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) consultants Susan Campbell (Special Assistant for Enrollment Management, University of Southern Maine) and Kathy Stockwell (Faculty Advising Coordinator, Fox Valley Technical College).1 The final meeting in June included all Directors of Advisement (the CUNY Advisement Council) as well as Study Group members, both to widen participation and to prepare for shifting the work of next steps to the Advisement Council in 2012-2013. An overview of Study Group findings and recommendations follow. OAA Advisement Study Group Findings The majority of campuses have established advising mission or goal statements aligned with national standards established by NACADA and CAS (the Council for Advancement of Standards in Higher Education). CUNY campus advising philosophies generally adhere to NACADA’s concept of advising as a teaching and learning process that requires learning outcomes, a pedagogy and assessment mechanisms— all aligned with institutional mission. Some CUNY campuses have developed advising syllabi that outline roles and responsibilities for students and advisors. The NACADA concept of academic advising (2006) offers the following sample learning outcomes:

Students will be able to:

· craft a coherent educational plan based on assessment of abilities, aspirations, interests, and values;

· use complex information from various sources to set goals, reach decisions, and achieve those goals;

· assume responsibility for meeting academic program requirements; · articulate the meaning of higher education and the intent of the institution’s curriculum; · cultivate the intellectual habits that lead to a lifetime of learning; and · behave as citizens who engage in the wider world around them.

Defining High Quality Advising CUNY advisement philosophies differentiate between prescriptive approaches that focus on requirements and developmental approaches that take into account the active role of the student (see Lowenstein, 2005). CAS standards for academic advising state that the primary purpose of academic advising programs is to assist students in the development of meaningful educational plans (CAS, 2010). Various strategies are underway at CUNY campuses to facilitate the development of individual educational plans, including mandatory advisement of students with fewer than 12 credits at John Jay; special group advising through Freshmen Academies at

1 The NACADA consultancy was approved by OAA leadership in March 2012 to support the Advisement Study

Group. Both consultants are advisement leaders at their respective campuses and have served as lead NACADA consultants at numerous colleges across the country. Specific charges to the NACADA consultants were to help the Study Group consider advisement assessment models and to support the development of learning outcomes for advising.

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Queensborough; “It’s About Me,” an online planning tool at Hunter; and the use of e-portfolios for transfer students at Lehman. In addition to facilitating the development of students’ educational plans, the Study Group identified other key components of high quality advising programs, including pre-enrollment activities, orientation offerings with faculty involvement, mandatory and intrusive advisement in the first year, early alert systems, differentiated services for transfer students based on their point of entry, ongoing training for faculty and professional advisors, effective use of technology and comprehensive assessment. For each component, there are promising practices already in place across CUNY. For example, CSI recently implemented a comprehensive, mandatory orientation for all new students. Baruch has in place a mandatory six-week program for at-risk students identified through their early alert systems. Faculty at City Tech reach out to each new student one month in advance of classes. Advisement Staffing and Services This first pass at an inventory of advising resources in CUNY has revealed a range of staffing and organizational differences such that use of student to advisor caseload ratios and a more in-depth ratio analysis would give us an inadequate, even erroneous, picture of actual advising services. Thus, such ratios by campus are not included in this first pass scan. Attempts to determine ratios simply did not provide a complete picture of the advising resources available to students on most, if not all, campuses, given the range of advising services from units across a campus that may not technically be under the auspices of official campus advising operations . The Study Group did however review the NACADA data on student to advisor caseload ratios, as noted below, as a point of reference on the topic should we want to pursue this further for future analysis and reporting. Appendix B, CUNY Advisement Staffing and College Profile, provides each campus’s number of students, number of advisors, and the target populations the advisors serve. Students are measured as total headcounts and advisors are measured as total professional advisors. Thus, although all students are included, not included are employees who sometimes serve as advisors (e.g., faculty, disabilities office personnel, veterans’ office personnel, career services office). Academic advisement staffing is supplemented by career services, disabilities offices, counseling centers, veterans’ services and in some cases ESL services (see Appendix C: CUNY Select Student Services Staffing and Role in Academic Advisement). In some cases these offices provide informal academic advising, particularly through career services. Further, all campuses have faculty involvement in advisement in some capacity, which is detailed in Appendix D: CUNY Faculty Advisement Policies. Our NACADA consultants provided us with an early release of the results of their most recent national survey on academic advising, conducted in 2011 (National Academic Advising Association, 2012). From the preliminary results: “Based on the survey data, the median advising caseload for all institutional types is 296 per full-time professional academic advisor… By institutional size, the median individual advisor caseloads are 233 for small institutions, 333

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for medium-sized institutions, and 600 for large institutions… the median advising loads per advisor by institutional type are 441 for two-year institutions, 260 for public bachelor institutions, 100 for private bachelor institutions, 300 for public masters institutions, 179 for private masters institutions, 285 for public doctorate institutions, 200 for private doctorate institutions, and 225 for proprietary institutions (no page numbers).” The NACADA report further states, “there truly is no ideal or recommended advising caseload for advisors, as advising case is relative… Even if you identify a similar institutional type… with a similar student population, similar programs, even in a similar geographical area, there will still be differences in campus climate, campus politics, institutional mission and goals… that prevent comparison of advising caseloads from being truly meaningful.” NACADA cites such variables as the additional responsibilities of advisors (very common at CUNY), the delivery mode of advising (e.g., group vs. individual), the use of technology (increasing at CUNY, for example, the online orientation sessions developed at Hunter), advising approach and philosophy (developmental vs. prescriptive) and the issue of serving different student cohorts with different needs (at CUNY, for example, the importance of freshman advising and the large numbers of transfer students). NACADA stresses the importance of explicit goals or learning outcomes for advisement programs to inform the designation of case loads. The report further cites the CAS standards for academic advising which provide the following qualitative guidelines: “academic advising caseloads must… allow appropriate amount of time for students to discuss plans, programs, courses, academic progress, and other subjects related to their education programs… [Further,] academic status of the student… should be taken into consideration when determining caseloads (NACADA, 2012, no page numbers).” The Role of Faculty Advisement staffing reported above and in Appendix B do not include faculty who advise in the major. Nine of the campuses formally shift all advising to faculty in the majors after the first year or declaration of major—Bronx, Hostos, Laguardia, Brooklyn, the New Community College, NY City Tech, City, College of Staten Island, and York. Eight of the campuses maintain advisement services through professional advisors throughout the undergraduate experience (which does not preclude and often encourages faculty advising)—Borough of Manhattan, Kingsborough, Queensborough, Hunter, John Jay, Lehman, Medgar, and Queens. City College houses professional advisors in their various schools, and several of the campuses have specially designated advisors by discipline. The majority of the campuses report a shared/dual advising model where the advising function is shared between an Advising/Student Success Center staffed with professional advisors and faculty advisors in the department for the major. Both forms of advisement are available to students throughout their academic career (see Appendix D: CUNY Faculty Advisement Policies). The role and delivery method of advising is equally varied across our campuses. How faculty are selected to serve as advisors, what kind of caseload they have, and if they are compensated or trained in some way are all areas of inquiry the Study Group examined. Appendix E, CUNY role

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in Faculty Advising, summarizes this information by campus and demonstrates once again the range of practice to be found across the University. The majority of colleges consider faculty advisement a standard part of faculty workload duties, while several award release time for 1-2 faculty members to serve as primary advisors for the department, as is the case with Brooklyn, City, Hunter and Lehman. Summer advisement is generally compensated with non-teaching adjunct funds, and in some cases major advisement in the department is considered part of the duties of the department chairs and unit coordinators and is taken into consideration when determining release time. By and large, there is very little formal training for faculty to serve as advisors, as it is largely conducted through mentoring and takes place within the department. More formal advisement training for faculty takes place in the community colleges more so than in the senior colleges, as in the case at Hostos, BMCC, Bronx, LaGuardia and the New Community College. Both CAS and NACADA call for ongoing professional development as an integral part of a high quality academic advising program. CUNY campuses employ various approaches to professional development. Kingsborough requires training for faculty and professional advisors. At BMCC, faculty mentors have been trained to provide their department faculty with responses to discipline specific issues related to academic advisement. In addition, professional academic advisors train new faculty in the advisement procedures and policies of the college. Similarly, new faculty at City Tech do not advise initially but shadow veteran advisors and participate in advising workshops. Bronx has a faculty fellows program in which designated faculty are trained and then certified as expert or “master” advisors within their departments. LaGuardia offers a three-part “Art of Advising” seminar that explores informational, relational and conceptual elements of advisement. The Role of Technology Technology is a critical tool for faculty and professional advisors. In particular at CUNY, Degree Works, Hobson’s Connect, Hobson’s Retain, TIPPS and CUNYFirst must be integrated and optimized. This is especially important in relation to implementing Pathways. In reviewing Degree Works usage data, it is clear that the product is significantly under-used. The number of uses in December 2011 ranged from 2955 to 23,519 across the campuses, with the number of distinct users during that same time ranging from 1566 to 8463 by campus. Degree Works’ features include an education plan module and academic notes section, neither of which is widely used. There are some features in Degree Works that could be improved, for example, if the education plan and notes could be carried with a student who transfers to another campus. Another potentially useful improvement to Degree Works would be if the “what if” degree audit function could serve as a tool for considering transfer as well as changing majors or other academic programs within a college. Beyond the software products already in place, colleges have developed online advising tools to free advisors from having to use their precious time with students to convey basic information. For example, Hunter has developed ten mandatory orientation modules that use You-Tube to walk students through various processes such as creating an online student account. New

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Hunter students must complete the modules prior to attending a mandatory in-person orientation session. Online attendance is monitored through Hobson’s Retain, one simple illustration of how integrating technologies can create efficiencies and new value to students. Hunter has made particularly good use of Hobson’s Retain for communication and early alert purposes, and can serve as a model for other campuses as they consider more sophisticated ways to implement the tool. Assessing Advisement Programs An ongoing challenge for advisement programs, at CUNY and across the country, is how to meaningfully assess program quality and effectiveness, particularly in relation to student outcomes. CAS recommends that assessments of advisement programs include “qualitative and quantitative methodologies as appropriate, to determine whether and to what degree the stated mission, goals, and student learning and development goals are being met” (CAS, 2010, p. 13). At CUNY, most campuses use student satisfaction surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of advising, including those created by the institutions, the CUNY Student Experience Survey, and the Community College or National Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE or NSSE). Most campuses also issue regular reports based on specific advisement program plans and institutional priorities. Some campuses are using rubrics, for example, to assess peer advisor training. Other campuses are creating standardized assessment templates to be used across departments, including advising. Several campuses have identified advising as an institutional priority, creating opportunities for cross-departmental and even campus-wide planning and assessment. CUNY Core Advisement Learning Outcomes and Opportunities The Study Group, supported by the NACADA consultants and in collaboration with the CUNY Advisement Council, agreed to a set of core advisement learning outcomes, key learning opportunities or activities to realize the outcomes, and evidence needed to assess efficacy (see Appendix F, Core Advisement Learning Outcomes and Opportunities). While aspirational in nature, the Core Advisement Outcomes potentially establish a set of expectations for evidence-based and promising practice— a map of the student experience and how academic advisement can support student engagement and success along the way. The Core Advisement Outcomes are framed by a common mission: through academic advisement CUNY students will develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to be able to demonstrate self-awareness and self-efficacy in the development of an educational plan, as well as the resiliency, discipline and motivation to reach personal and professional goals. Further, advisement will contribute to improved student success, particularly to help build momentum to degree completion. The Core Outcomes for students focus specifically on self-assessment, the development of an educational plan and the effective use of resources.

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Recommendations I. ENHANCE ADVISEMENT TECHNOLOGIES Technology is a critical tool for faculty and professional advisors. In particular at CUNY, Degree Works, Hobson’s Retain*, TIPPS and CUNYFirst must be integrated and optimized to most effectively support high quality advisement. This is especially important in relation to effectively implementing Pathways and ensuring that students and the faculty and staff who advise them fully understand requirements both for general education and for majors. Toward this end, the Central Office will: 1. Develop and implement a plan to optimize the use of Degree Works. The plan will include strategies to: - increase usage overall by faculty, staff and students;

- better utilize existing functionality particularly related to educational plans and degree audit;

- establish standard business processes to ensure data integrity and improve confidence with the tool;

- evaluate staffing needs relative to the ongoing maintenance of Degree Works; - develop and implement comprehensive Degree Works training strategies for

faculty, staff and students; - determine priorities for improved functionality; - evaluate the effectiveness of the tool.

* related and ongoing activities are underway through the Offices of Student Affairs and

Enrollment Management to support campus efforts to optimize the use of Hobson’s Retain to improve communications with students and to serve as an early alert system

2. Evaluate and improve CUNYFirst functionality in support of advisement. The University will establish an advisement technologies focus group to provide input on related planning; specific areas of focus will include:

- evaluation of the CUNYFirst advisement module; - implementation of modifications to automate, accelerate and ensure data

integrity related to transfer credit evaluation; - evaluation of the effectiveness of CUNYFirst, TIPSS and Degree Works integration

in relation to advisement, including financial aid information. 3. Design CUNY-wide online modules for general advisement of new first-time and transfer

students. Establish a process to: - review existing online orientation modules; - identify topics for CUNY-wide development (including Pathways);

- design, implement and evaluate CUNY-wide orientation modules.

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II. EVALUATE ADVISEMENT PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS An ongoing challenge for advisement programs, at CUNY and across the country, is how to meaningfully assess program quality and effectiveness, particularly in relation to student outcomes. While the work of program assessment must take place at the campuses, the Central Office can provide support and will: Develop a framework for the comprehensive evaluation of advisement programs at the campuses. Evaluation components will include: - core learning outcomes and key learning opportunities for students;

- effectiveness of first-year advisement for first-time freshmen and new transfer students; - advisement staffing capacity, particularly aimed at reducing advisor to advisee ratios for first-year

students; - targeted services for special populations; - the role of faculty, including capacity issues related to large departments/ majors; - the role of peers; - use of advisement technologies; - advisement tracking and documentation systems.

III. EXAMINE ADVISEMENT TRAINING AND CERTIFICATION MODELS Both CAS and NACADA call for ongoing professional development as an integral part of a high quality academic advising program. CUNY campuses employ various approaches to professional development. The Central Office can - Evaluate advisor training strategies within and outside CUNY to identify exemplars and take appropriate action to implement best training practices. Evaluation components will include: - evidence of effectiveness; - capacity to scale.

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References CAS Standards for Academic Advising. (2010). Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education. Retrieved from www.cas.edu/index.php/standards. Lowenstein, M. (2005). If advising is teaching, what do advisors teach? NACADA Journal, 25 (2), 65-73. National Academic Advising Association. (2006). NACADA concept of academic advising.

Retrieved from www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Concept-Advising. National Academic Advising Association. (2012). Preliminary Draft of Report on 2011

National Survey of Academic Advisement (publication pending). Scrivner, S., Weiss, M. & Sommo, C. (2012). What Can a Multifaceted Program Do for College Students?

Early Results from an Evaluation of Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP). MDRC.

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Appendix A: Academic Advisement Study Group Members Karrin Wilks*, University Dean for Undergraduate Studies, CUNY (co-chair) Donna Linderman, University Associate Dean for Student Success Initiatives and Executive Director for Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), CUNY (co-chair) Otilia Abraham, Associate Director of Admissions and Academic Advisement, SPS Michele Cuomo, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Queensborough Jason Finkelstein, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, Bronx Cynthia Jones, Lecturer, Department of English, Hostos Mitchell Levy, Exec. Director, Center for Counseling/Advising, LaGuardia Freda McLean, Director of Academic Advisement and Transfer, BMCC Jean Richard, Professor, Department of Mathematics, BMCC Sharon Ricks, Director of Academic Advisement, Baruch Zuleika Rodriguez, Director of Academic Advisement Center, Kingsborough Elizabeth Schaible, Chair, Department of Hospitality Management, NYCCT Laura Silverman, Director of Academic Advising Center, Queens Mary Ruth Strzeszewski, Acting Executive Director for Academic Affairs, City Laura Tesman, Professor, Department of Theater, Brooklyn Sumaya Villanueva, Director of Academic Advisement, John Jay Rob Whittaker, Associate Provost of Undergraduate Studies, Lehman Case Willoughby, Director of Academic Advising Services, Hunter *Replaced by Lucinda Zoe, University Dean of Academic Initiatives, February 2013.

Initial Draft, September 7, 2012 Revised January 2013, April & May 2013

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Appendix B: CUNY Advisement Staffing

CUNY ADVISEMENT STAFFING* and College Profile

Collected by OAA (Updated June 19, 2012)

*numbers for total undergraduates, first-time-freshmen, (not including SEEK/CD) and new transfer students from OIRA, official fall

2011; staffing numbers do not include directors or support staff in advisement centers, for totals, PT staff are equated to .5 FTE; staffing numbers do not include career, disabilities, mental health or ESL services; staffing numbers do not include faculty who advise in the major.

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Baruch Advising Center All undergraduates including declared and undeclared

TOTAL: 14,266 FT: 6 majors 12,968

FTF: 1119 PT: 15-30 hours per week 5

New Trans: 1350 PT: Peer Advisor 1

SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 756

FT: all counselors 5

Honors College Macaulay Honors students, Baruch Scholars,

FT: 5 Provost Scholars 542

PT: 1

Total: 20 14,266

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Brooklyn Advising Center All incoming freshmen for first two semesters;

TOTAL: 13,096 FT: 10 all transfer students first semester; all continuing

FTF: 883 PT: 2 students needing general education advisement,

New Trans: 1713

students on probation, readmitted students

Brooklyn Scholars:

PT: 2

Macaulay:

FT: 2 240

SEEK: SEEK eligible students 945

FT: all counselors 5

TOTAL: 13,096

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

City Gateway Academic Center: Undecided; students waiting to apply to professional 2,005

TOTAL: 12,863 FT: 3 schools

FTF: 1303 School of Engineering: Engineering majors 2,214

New Trans: 1350 FT: 8

Division of Humanities Humanities majors 2,226

FT: 3

Division of Science Science majors, including Macaulay Honors College, 2,065

FT: 4 includes 2 FT advisors for Macaulay

Division of Social Science Social Science majors 2,148

FT: 2

Division of Inter. Studies Interdisciplinary studies majors 599 FT: 5

School of Education Education majors 614

FT: 1

School of Biomedical Ed: Biomedical majors 442

FT: 1

School of Architecture: Architecture majors 323

FT: 1

SEEK: SEEK - eligible students 801

FT: all counselors 6

TOTAL: 34 12,863

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College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

CSI Advising Center: Undergrads up to 45 credits and re: gen ed 5,135

TOTAL: 13,155 FT: 4

FTF: 2341 PT: 7

New Trans: 1384 Macaulay Honors College: All Macaulay students 160

FT: 1

Teachers Academy: Teacher education majors 32

PT: 1

Verrazano School: Honors students up to 45 credits and other students 180

FT: 1 re: gen ed

Veterans: Student veterans 250

PT: 2

SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 474

FT: all counselors 3

TOTAL: 14 13,155

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Hunter Advising Center: All undergraduates 15,017

TOTAL: 16,345 FT:5 HEO assocs, 4 HEO assts 16

FTF: 2097 6 assts to HEO New Trans:

1741 PT: non-teaching adjuncts 2

SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 515

FT: all counselors 5

Scholar Cohorts: Students in elite scholar programs 343

FT: 1

PT: 2

Macaulay: All MHC students 470

FT: 4

TOTAL: 28 16,345

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

John Jay Advising Center: Current populations served: freshmen, transfer,

TOTAL: 12,887 FT: 8 re-admits, probation, all gen ed

FTF: 1483 PT: 5 New Trans:

1371 PT Peer Advisors: 11

SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 1,128

FT: all counselors 6

Honors Program: Honors Students 90

FT: 1

Interdisciplinary Studies ISP Students 273

Program:

FT: 1

TOTAL: 24 12,887

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College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Lehman Advising Center: All undergraduate students(including SEEK students)

TOTAL: 9863 FT: 4 beyond the initial registration of their freshman 8811

FTF: 428 PT: 3 semester with the exception of Adult Degree, Lehman New Trans:

1520

Scholar and Macaulay Honors College Students

SEEK: SEEK- eligible students 852

FT: all counselors 6

Lehman Scholars

PT: 2 125

Macaulay:

FT: 1 75

TOTAL: 14 9,863

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Medgar Advising Center: All students (continuing, re-admits, transfer, 5,482

TOTAL: 6966 FT: 6 non-degree) except those who haven't completed

FTF: 1067 PT: first/second semesters (5000 per semester)

New Trans: 618 SEEK: SEEK - eligible students 417

FT: all counselors 3

Freshman Year Program: students during first and second semesters 1,067

FT: 8

TOTAL: 17 6,966

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

NYCCT Advising Center Freshmen, new transfers, SEEK, readmit, non-degree

TOTAL: 15961 FT: 7 includes specially designated advisors by disc.

FTF: 2760 PT: 10

New Trans: 1123 SEEK: 959

FT: all counselors 7

TOTAL: 19 15,961

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Queens Advising Center: All undergraduates not affiliated with SEEK or Honors 15,147

TOTAL: 16,559 2 HEO assts, 7 assts to HEO 9

FTF: 1231 PT: 6

New Trans: 2156 SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 1,012

FT: all counselors 5

Honors: Honors and Macaulay students 400

FT: 2 Macaulay, 2 Queens 3

TOTAL: 20 16,559

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College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

York Advisement Center: New transfers with 30 or more credits, and 3,951

TOTAL: 8210 FT: 3 undeclared/liberal arts majors

FTF: 761 PT: 1

New Trans: 988 Counseling Services: All freshmen and students with under 30 cred. 761

FT: 2 HEO assocs, 1 HEO asst 3

Honors:

PT: 1

Veterans:

PT: 1

SEEK: SEEK-eligible students 708

FT: all councelors 4

TOTAL: 8,210

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

BMCC Advising Center: All students, except those in College Discovery

TOTAL: 24,463 FT: 11 majoring in Liberal Arst, ASAP, Allied Health Science

FTF: 6089 PT Peer Advisors: 6 majors and clinical Nursing

New Trans: 1242 CD: CD-eligible students 563

FT: all councelors 6

ASAP: Students enrolled in ASAP 266

FT: all HEO assts 4

Allied Health Science: All Respiratory Therapy, Health Information

FT: 2 Technology & Paramedic majors

Nursing Department:

FT: 1

TOTAL: 27 24,463

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Bronx Advising Center: 45+ credits in good academic standing; academic 2,168

TOTAL: 11,451 FT: 2 HEO assts, 2 asst to HEO, 8 warning and probation students; pre-nursing with 9

FTF: 1956 4 grant-funded credits or less

New Trans: 1181 CD: CD-eligible students 351

FT: all counselors 5

ASAP: Students enrolled in ASAP 163

FT: all HEO assts 2

PT: MSW 1 Serves high-needs students

General Counseling Faculty: Freshmen (first and second semester) 1,956

FT: 8

PT: adjuncts 18

TOTAL: 33 11,451

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College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

Hostos Advising Center: Continuing, Liberal Arts 1,800

TOTAL: 7078 FT: 3 Career Degrees/ESL 1,500

FTF: 1178 PT: 1 Re-admitted students 600

New Trans: 600 Academic Achievement: Freshmen 1,178

FT: 2

Transfer Services: 600

FT: 1

PT: 1

CD: CD-eligible students 144

FT: all counselors 2

ASAP: Students enrolled in ASAP 123

FT: all HEO assts 2

TOTAL: 11 7,078

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

KCC Advising Center: Continuing students from second semester through 6,300

TOTAL: 19,261 FT: 6 graduation

FTF: 2596 PT: 2

New Trans: 1720 Freshmean Services: First semester freshman, not enrolled in a learning 1,193

FT: 6 community

PT: 4

Health Careers Center Continuing health careers students from second 3,370

FT: 6 semester through graduation

Learning Communities: First semester freshman, not enrolled in a learning 1,023 FT: 6 community

PT: 2

Transfer/New Start/Scholarship: Transfer and New Start students 4,119

FT: 3

PT: 6

CD: CD-eligible students 434

FT: all counselors 4

ASAP: Students enrolled in ASAP 275

FT: all HEO assts 4

TOTAL: 42 19,261

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

LaGuardia Advising Center: Students below 30 cr., ESL Students, Students

TOTAL: 18,623 FT: 5 advisors, 8 counselors 13 w/Basic Skills Req. Also, probation, readmit,

FTF: 3057 PT: 19 adjunct counselors, 28 suspended students, academic appeals, Freshman New Trans:

1125 2 counseling interns, 7 advising Seminar students

peer mentors

CD: CD-eligible students 573

FT: all counselors 6

ASAP: 228

FT: all HEO assts 4 Students enrolled in ASAP

Educational Planning: New and Non-Degree prior to start of classes

FT: 5

PT: 4

TOTAL: 44 18,623

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College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

QCC Advising Center: Continuing students with < 25 ctc and / or 2.50

TOTAL: 16,837 FT: 9 GPA, incoming transfers, incoming readmits

FTF: 3829 PT: 2

New Trans: 1125 CD: CD - eligible students 347

FT: all counselors 3

New Student Enrollment/ Incoming Freshmen and fist semester freshmen 3,829

Academies:

FT: 10 going into second semester

PT: 1

ASAP: Students enrolled in ASAP 232

FT: all HE assts 4

COPE: Continuing students receiving public assistance

FT: 1 along with BMI/MALES Students

Collegiate Science and Minority students interested in Science and Technology

Technology Entry Program

(C-STEP):

FT: 1

International Student Services All F-1 students (International Students) + class

FT: 1 registration to all new incoming F-1 status students

Transfer Coordinator: Four year college transfer students

FT: 1

PT: 1

TOTAL: 33 16,837

College Office/Staffing Designated Population Headcount

SPS Advising Center: All students 1,220

TOTAL: 1220 FT: 5

FTF: 0 PT: 3

New Trans: 301 TOTAL: 7 1,220

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Appendix C: CUNY Select Student Services Staffing and Role in Academic Advisement

CUNY SELECT STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES STAFFING AND ROLE IN ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT* August 30, 2012

Career Services

2 Disabilities Offices

3 Counseling

4 Veterans’ Services

5 ESL/ELL Offices

6

BMCC FT: 7 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 2 PT: 2 advisement: no

FT: 11 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

NA

Bronx FT: 4 PT: 1 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 1 advisement: no

FT: 2 PT: 0 advisement: no

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

no response

Hostos FT: 7 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 2 PT: 6 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

no response

KCC FT: 6 PT: 7 advisement: yes

FT: 5 PT: 5 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 7 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 2 advisement: yes

LaGuardia FT: 7 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 10 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: yes/no

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

NA

NCC no career services office

NA no counseling center

no veterans’ services office

NA

QCC FT: 4 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 10 advisement: yes

FT: 7 PT: 7 advisement: yes

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

NA except for CLIP students

2 All career services offices provide some level of informal advising.

3 Most disabilities offices offer formal advising.

4 Personal counseling is the priority for counseling offices across CUNY; most community college counseling offices provide advising to

students on probation, those facing dismissal and those seeking appeal of an academic or financial decision. 5 part-time staffing for veterans’ services include employees who work full-time but with responsibilities outside of veterans’ affairs

6 most campuses do not have dedicated advisement offices for English language learners; many have academic/ learning/ tutoring

centers for English language support (CELS) with staff who provide formal or informal advising

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Career Services

7 Disabilities Offices

8 Counseling

9 Veterans’ Services

10 ESL/ELL Offices

11

Baruch FT: 9 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 5 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 5 advisement: no

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

no response

Brooklyn FT: 10 PT: 8 advisement: yes

FT: 2 PT: 3 advisement: no

FT: 4 PT: 10 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

FT: 2 PT: 0 advisement: yes

City FT: 3 PT: 4 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 8 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 0 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

no response

City Tech FT: 4 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 4 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

no response

CSI FT: 5 PT: 4 advisement: yes

FT: 5 PT: 5 advisement: yes

FT: 6 PT: 2 advisement: no

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

NA informal counseling through immersion

Hunter FT: 5 PT: 3 advisement: yes

FT: 1 PT: 5 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 0 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: yes

NA

John Jay FT: 7 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 4 advisement: yes

FT: 13 PT: 4 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

FT: 1 advisement through CELS

Lehman no response no response FT: 4 PT: 3 advisement: no

FT: 1 PT: 0 advisement: no

no response

Medgar FT: 4 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 2 PT: 1 advisement: yes

FT: 1 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

NA

Queens FT: 8 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 5 PT: 6 advisement: yes

FT: 4 PT: 1 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

NA information advising through ESL program

York FT: 4 PT: 1 advisement: yes

FT: 3 PT: 2 advisement: yes

FT: 2 PT: 0 advisement: yes

FT: 0 PT: 1 advisement: no

FT: 1 advisement: yes

CUNY TOTAL* FT: 94 PT: 34

FT: 52 PT: 74

FT: 76 PT: 42

FT: 8 PT: 9

FT: 5 PT: 2

* data self-reported by campuses; CUNY totals do not include staff from campuses that did not respond to the request for information

7 All career services offices provide some level of informal advising.

8 Most disabilities offices offer formal advising.

9 Personal counseling is the priority for counseling offices across CUNY; most community college counseling offices provide advising to

students on probation, those facing dismissal and those seeking appeal of an academic or financial decision. 10

part-time staffing for veterans’ services include employees who work full-time but with responsibilities outside of veterans’ affairs 11

most campuses do not have dedicated advisement offices for English language learners; many have academic/ learning/ tutoring centers for English language support (CELS) with staff who provide formal or informal advising

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Appendix D: CUNY Faculty Advisement Policies

CUNY FACULTY ADVISEMENT POLICIES Draft Revised August 30, 2012

College Point at which students move to faculty advisors

Advisement organizational model

BMCC Students that are enrolled in special programs, such as ASAP, FLA & College Discovery are only advised by professional advisors. They do not transition to faculty advisors.

Students enrolled in the Allied Health Sciences are advised by their department, by either faculty advisors or designated professional staff.

For Liberal Arts students, the Academic Advisement & Transfer Center does a total intake of new students with remediation, who are undecided, or are pursuing the Nursing or other allied health field. Once these students have completed their remedial coursework and have decided on their intended major, these students are parsed off to faculty in the academic department of their interest. Students interested in pursuing Nursing or another allied health science remain with an academic advisor until they are accepted to the program or graduate from BMCC.

All other students, excluding clinical Nursing students and Allied Health Science majors, have the option of seeing a faculty advisor or an advisor in the Academic Advisement & Transfer Center.

Shared: Academic Advisement and Transfer Center and Faculty Shared/Dual: Centralized for Liberal Arts students (professional advisors); decentralized for all other majors (faculty advisors and professional advisors); Academic Advisement and Transfer Center; Other special program advisors; and Faculty

Bronx Starting with the Fall 12 semester, faculty will advise students in good academic standing with more than 15 earned credits.

Shared: Advising function is shared between the Academic Success Center, responsible for freshmen, and faculty, responsible for students in good academic standing with more than 15 earned credits in their declared major.

Hostos Continuing students are advised in academic departments by major. Incoming transfer students are advised by professional advisors in the Office of Academic Achievement.

Shared/ dual: Centralized for Liberal Arts students (professional advisors); decentralized for all other majors (faculty advisors and professional advisors)

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College Point at which students move to faculty advisors

Advisement organizational model

KCC Although students can meet with a faculty advisor from their second semester through graduation, they tend to meet with an academic advisor in the Academic Advisement Center for advisement services.

Shared: First semester freshmen are advised by the Office of Freshman Services and the Opening Doors Learning Communities Program. First semester transfer students are advised by the Transfer, Career and New Start Office. Students in their second semester through graduation in non-allied health programs are advised in the Academic Advisement Center, and students in their second semester through graduation in allied health programs are advised in the Health Careers and Retention Center. Students enrolled in special programs such as ASAP, CD, and Veteran's Affairs are advised by their counselors associated with the program.

LaGuardia At 30 credits and the completion of all basic skills courses and with good academic standing, students are referred to faculty departments.

Shared: Center for Counseling, Advising and Academic Support, special programs, and faculty.

NCC After first year, as students move into their programs, advisement will more clearly include faculty participation.

Shared. Student Success Advocates will advise students during the first year and will be members of instructional teams teaching the first-year curriculum.

QCC Students in professional programs see faculty advisors after earning 25 credits; all other students go to the Academic Advisement Center.

Shared: Freshmen are advised by the Freshman Coordinators. Readmits, probation, transfers, and continuing students with less than 25 credits or those outside professional programs come to the Advisement Center.

Baruch Students are encouraged to meet with faculty advisors in the academic departments.

Centralized: The Center is dedicated to helping students transition into college and navigate their academic careers. This is done by providing early intervention programs for first-year freshmen and transfer students, new student orientation sessions, academic probation workshops and daily individual advisement sessions.

Brooklyn Student who have accrued at least 60 credits and declared a major are encouraged to seek advisement from the major academic department. The first two semesters are mandatory that the student be advised by the CAASS. At any point thereafter students can seek advisement from the academic departments.

Centralized: Advisors lead an academic orientation and are responsible for registering first- and second-semester freshmen and incoming transfer students. CAASS is responsible for advising students on General Education and overall graduation requirements. Students are also advised by faculty once they declare a major.

City Undecided students or those students attempting to meet eligibility requirements for technical schools are assigned to the Gateway Academic Center (GAC). Once they declare a major, or are accepted into the school of their choice, they are advised in that school or division.

Decentralized: There are 4 major advising areas at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at The City College: the Gateway Academic Center (GAC); Division of Humanities; Division of Social Science and the Division of Science. The declared major is assigned to the division which houses his/her respective major.

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College Point at which students move to faculty advisors

Advisement organizational model

City (continue) Students are advised by faculty after they declare a major. OSD: When the student has earned a total of 45 credits or more, the student is then assigned a department faculty advisor.

Major advising for declared students takes place in the department of their respective majors. OSD: The OSD is responsible for advising all Grove School of Engineering students with less than 45 credits. Freshmen meet individual with an assigned Office of Student Development advisor several times during the first semester and at least once in the other semesters until they reach 45 credits.

City Tech During their second semester. All second semester students, freshmen and beyond are advised by their academic departments with the exception of students not fully CUNY certified. They are advised by the Liberal Arts department.

Dual and total intake model: First-semester freshman are advised in the New Student Center, while transfer, readmit, non-degree, and in-house unclassified health students are sometimes referred to their academic departments for additional courses.

CSI All students in declared majors and in good academic standing are assigned faculty mentors once they have earned 45 college level credits. Faculty mentor assignments may be to either:

A specific faculty mentor.

The academic department.

Shared – total intake and dual model:

CAAS advises all entering freshmen, transfer and continuing students until they have earned a maximum of 45 credits.

CAAS advises all associate degree Liberal Arts students through graduation.

CAAS is responsible for all general education advisement.

At 45 credits, all students are required to have chosen a major.

Faculty mentors are assigned all students who are in declared majors, good academic standing and who have earned 45 or more credits for major, minor and pre-professional advisement.

Hunter Faculty advising is available at any time, but students are particularly encouraged to seek out faculty advising with regard to declaring and pursuing the major(s) and minor(s).

Dual: Student Affairs Advisors handle general education, major exploration, adjustment/transition issues, etc. Faculty members advise for majors.

John Jay Students are strongly encouraged to seek faculty advisement at the point of major and/or minor declaration.

Shared - total intake model: All first-time freshmen are advised by the AAC until they accumulate 30 earned credits. After that point, students are encouraged to seek advisement from faculty in their declared major. Entering transfer students are also advised in the AAC. They must seek advisement from faculty in their declared major during their first semester at the college.

Lehman Students are advised by faculty at the point of major and/or minor declaration. Advise second semester to graduation, specifically for general education requirements.

Dual: Professional advisors for general education and faculty advisors for major/minor advisement.

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College Point at which students move to faculty advisors

Advisement organizational model

Medgar Students are advised by faculty members only as needed.

Centralized: Students with less than 25 credits are advised by the Freshman Year Department, all seek students are advised by the SEEK Department, and all other students are advised by the Student Advocacy & Support Services Center (SASSC).

Queens They are encouraged to begin connecting to academic departments and faculty as first-year students; however, once they have declared a major, they are consistently encouraged to meet with faculty. Some departments require this and others do not.

Centralized: The Academic Advisement Center provides advising from orientation to departure. This includes some special groups in coordination with other offices/programs (i.e., Disabled, Athletes, etc.)

York Once students have declared a major, they are advised within their department.

Shared: The Counseling Center is responsible for freshmen; the Advisement Center is responsible for transfer and undecided students, and faculty are responsible for students with declared majors.

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Appendix E: CUNY Faculty Role in Advising

CUNY FACULTY ROLE IN ADVISING (As Reported by Campuses) Summary October 25, 2012

College How faculty

advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

Baruch varies by department; in some cases chairs advise; in other cases advisors are chosen based on their interest; in the School of Public Affairs advisors are chosen by the dean

varies by department; larger departments may have multiple advisors with one specializing in evening students

varies; up to 100 students per advisor

compensation varies widely across schools and departments, ranging from none to release time associated with chair or deputy chair duties to adjunct faculty who receive non-teaching adjunct funds to one-course reduction for full-timers

no formal training; some departments have hand-outs with advisement material

Brooklyn varies by department; in some cases chairs advise; in other cases all full-time faculty advise; some departments have a designated group of advisors

varies by department; some have equal distribution across faculty, others have designed advisors

varies widely; 25-110 advisees per faculty advisor

2-3 hours of reassigned time per semester

no formal training

City varies by department; in some cases all full-time faculty advise; some departments assign the most experienced faculty as advisors; others use volunteers

varies by department; some are evenly split among all faculty; in some cases the chair decides; in others there is no set caseload but advising provided by class visits and group meetings

varies widely; 1-240 advisees per faculty advisor

compensation ranges from nothing to 1 contact hour to full course release

varies by department; some have mentoring programs, others offering workshops; advising workshops are offered by registrar and CTL; on 10/19/12 City offered its first campus-wide faculty advising workshop

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College How faculty

advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

City Tech

all full-time faculty are involved in advisement

varies by department; some assign students, others allow students to choose based on interest and office hours; some department chairs take responsibility for particular students

varies by department; where students are assigned, 10-60 advisees per faculty advisor

no compensation during the academic year; summer advisors receive compensation

varies by department; some departments have mandatory training, others have optional training, and others have no training

Hunter varies by department; in some departments faculty share advising duties; in the majority chairs select or invite faculty to serve as advisors

varies by department; most departments, especially smaller ones, tend to have advising hours for walk-ins and no specific caseload; larger departments have full-time HEO advising staff

unknown compensation ranges from none to 1 course release per semester; departments dedicate 30 advising hours in the summer, for which faculty are paid summer rates

no formal training; largely conducted through mentoring, with new advisors sitting in on meetings between outgoing advisors and their students

John Jay major coordinators and chairs provide advisement in the major; there is plan underway to phase-in comprehensive faculty advisement over a three-year period

current practice varies

current practice varies; the plan is to work toward 200 advisees per faculty advisor (per course release)

currently, release time provided for coordinators and chairs includes time for advising; the plan is to provide release time and incentivize through a departmental allocation if 80% of faculty participate in targeted activities

faculty participating in the pilot receive training from the professional HEO advisement staff

Lehman varies by department; some designate faculty in introductory courses; others designate a group of major advisors; in small departments the advising is handled by the chair

each department, in consultation with the dean of its school, determines how many faculty should be designated and should receive release time; large departments also have staff advisors assigned to them

unknown compensation ranges from nothing to reassigned time; summer stipends are provided to department advisors usually pro-rated by FTE enrollment; compensation is set by deans; no college-wide policy

no formal training; supervision of faculty advising rests with the departments

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College How faculty

advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

Medgar varies by department; in most, full-time faculty serve as advisors/ mentors; in small departments, the chair serves as advisor

varies by department; faculty advise students in their course sections; students can request a specific advisor; some departments have advisors for specific areas of concentration

varies by department; 5-20 advisees per faculty advisor

no no formal training; some departments provide training during regular meetings; the Student Advocacy and Support Center provides workshops

Queens varies by department; in some cases chairs select advisors, in other cases all full-time faculty serve as advisors; in some cases faculty volunteer

generally, the caseload model is not adopted; students are not assigned advisors

varies by department

generally, advising is considered part of the faculty service obligation; in some departments advising time is factored into workload

varies by department; in some departments training is provided as needed or through mentors; in others there is no training

SPS SPS relies primarily on professional advisors

faculty may serve as mentors to students in capstone courses

NA NA NA

Staten Island

all full-time faculty are expected to advise; arrangements vary by department; some faculty are designated for advisement at-large, others provide advisement to specific populations

all academic departments have advisees assigned to their areas except Education; some advisees are assigned to the department at large, some to specific faculty, and some to HEO advising staff within departments

varies by department; 5-108 advisees per faculty advisor; CSI desires to obtain faculty caseloads between 20-25 students per faculty

compensated for summer advisement only (60% of hourly rate)

not required but initial and refresher advisement training is available to all faculty through the Center for Advising and Academic Services; new faculty orientation includes an introduction to advisement

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College How faculty advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

York varies by department; in the majority of cases, departments use the walk-in method and faculty sign up for advising times; in other cases the program director advises all students; in some programs, all full-time faculty serve as advisors

in most cases there is no caseload (students see whoever is available); many of the professional programs divide the students equally among all full-time faculty

varies by department; 6-66 advisees per faculty advisor

faculty do not normally receive extra compensation for advising between September and June; when assigned for advisement in August, they receive compensation

no formal training; some departments provide training, others provide mentoring; the nursing program provides detailed information and program-specific worksheets

BMCC all full-time faculty are expected to advise; specific advisement responsibilities are determined by departments; some departments require/ allow adjunct faculty to advise

liberal arts students are assigned to departments by the Advisement Center; departments determine assignments individual faculty

varies; no more than 20 for liberal arts faculty; considerably more for allied health science

no; during the academic year advisement is considered part of faculty responsibilities; during summer, faculty receive a non-teaching adjunct stipend (60% of adjunct rate) or volunteer in exchange for not advising during the January registration period

the Academic Advisement and Transfer Center coordinates all training, with several workshops each semester and one-on-one training available

Bronx all full-time faculty are expected to advise as part of “college service” taken into account in reappointment and tenure decisions

varies by department; some divide up all students and assign them to particular faculty; others do not assign students but post office hours for walk-ins

varies by department, up to 45 for the largest; most students seek advisement from the Advising Center after the registration period

no, during the academic year; during summer, faculty receive 60% of adjunct rates for advising assignment; for two semesters BCC established Advisement Fellows who were provided release time to receive extensive training in order to serve as resources for faculty

new faculty are required to attend a series of seminars including one session related to advisement; an additional intensive workshop on advisement is offered, as are advisement workshops for continuing faculty; some departments allow new faculty to shadow senior faculty

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College How faculty

advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is

determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

Hostos all full-time faculty are expected to serve as advisors

varies by department; students are not assigned a specific advisor but see faculty based on office hours/ availability (not always seeing the same advisor)

varies by department; 1-119 advisees per faculty advisor; there is no formal assignment, so some faculty see many advisees and others see none

no; advisement is part of workload and is a consideration under “student guidance” as part of the formal evaluation process for reappointment, tenure and promotion

training offered by Academic Advisement Center; faculty handbook on advisement created every semester

KCC all full-time permanent faculty serve as academic advisors

students in a given major are divided evenly among faculty

10-40 advisees per faculty advisor

no; advisement is part of faculty member’s responsibility as specified in the by-laws

each department trains its own faculty members on degree requirements; any significant campus-wide changes are disseminated by administrators

LaGuardia varies by department; most do not have a caseload model ; college-wide advising days connect students to faculty with support from professional advisors

varies by department; some assign faculty based on student interest or faculty knowledge of student

varies by department; 1-120 advisees per faculty advisor

no; “guidance” to students is a contractual obligation

college offers a wide variety of training opportunities and IT support; Advising Central Website provides comprehensive and up-to-date information; the semester or year-long Art of Advising faculty development seminar focuses on support students’ academic plans; some departments offer additional training

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College How faculty

advisors are selected or identified

How faculty advising caseload is determined

Range/size of faculty advising

caseload

Whether or not additional

compensation is provided

Training for faculty advisors

NCC faculty work in teams to advise students in the broadest sense curing the first-year experience; NCC still in the initial phase of implementing advisement in the major

all full-time faculty teaching in the second year will be expected to serve as primary advisors; caseload will be evenly distributed among faculty within a given major

NA no; NCC recognizes advising as a college service in the evaluation of full-time faculty

all faculty will participate in varying forms of professional development to support advising, including ongoing training on software systems

QCC varies by department; only students in specialized programs are directed to faculty advisors; others are served through the Academic Advisement Center

varies by department; in some cases, faculty are asked to sign up for a certain number of office hours; in other cases, the chair handles most of the advising

approximately 25 students per advisor

no no formal training; informal training is provided by chairs and senior faculty

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Appendix F: CUNY Core Advisement Learning Outcomes and Opportunities CUNY CORE ADVISEMENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND OPPORTUNITIES DRAFT REVISED July 6, 2012 Through academic advisement CUNY students will develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to be able to: Demonstrate self-awareness and self-efficacy in the development of an educational plan, as well as the resiliency, discipline and motivation to reach personal and professional goals. Advisement will contribute to improved student success, particularly to help build momentum to degree completion.

Overarching goals

First Semester Second semester* Second Year Third Year Graduate

1. Self- assessment

Key outcomes: - list personal skills, interests and goals - discuss strengths and weaknesses relative to study skills

Key outcomes: - articulate selection of major in relation to skills, interests and goals - analyze first semester academic performance; adjust approaches and plans as necessary

Key outcomes: - confirm appropriateness of choices of major and minor - prioritize academic goals and interests

Key outcomes: - clarify post-college opportunities and interests

Key outcomes: - articulate skills, preparation and interests to potential employer or for graduate schools admission - initiate career path or further course of study

2. Educational plan

Key outcomes: - articulate three action steps to explore majors and careers - select courses for first and second semesters - plan to enroll immediately and continuously in remedial course(s)

Key outcomes: - draft educational plan to complete general education requirements, begin work in the major and explore other areas of interest through electives - plan strategies to earn 30 credits per academic year

Key outcomes: - research opportunities for internships, study abroad, service learning and other co-curricular activities - appraise progress toward degree completion; revise academic plan as needed

Key outcomes: - engage in internships, study abroad, service learning or other co-curricular activity - research and plan for post-college career and graduate schools options

Key outcomes: - articulate three, five and ten year goals - present a plan to reach personal and professional goals, integrating skills, interests and life choices

3. Use of resources

Key outcomes: - locate and review use of Degree Works, select portal(s), college catalogue, and college email - locate and explain role of select offices, including advisement, tutoring, financial aid, registrar and bursar - register for classes

Key outcomes: - use Degree Works to draft educational plan - meet with at least one faculty member during office hours - regularly access online resources - use academic support services as needed

Key outcomes: - demonstrate understanding of academic policies, including how to calculate GPA - use Degree Works to track progress toward degree

Key outcomes: - use Degree Works to track progress toward degree - develop relationships with faculty and staff

Key outcomes: - activate membership with alumni association

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Overarching goals

First Semester Second semester* Second Year Third Year Graduate

Learning Opportunities

- pre-orientation online tutorial(s) - orientation - Freshman Seminar - advising session - co-curricular activity related to areas of interest

- advising session - meeting with faculty - meeting with career services, tutoring or other office - peer mentoring

- advising session - meeting with faculty - peer mentoring - meeting with career services - majors/ minors fairs - transfer workshops - co-curricular activities

- advising session - meeting with faculty - peer mentoring - meeting with career services - co-curricular activities

- exit interview

Evidence (Assessment)

- participation rates - action plan - initiation of education plan - enrollment in remedial course(s) - satisfaction and self-assessment surveys

- participation rates - credit accumulation - education plan - completion of remedial course(s) - satisfaction and self-assessment surveys

- credit accumulation - updated education plan - completion of general education requirements - satisfaction and self-assessment surveys

- credit accumulation - updated education plan - satisfaction and self-assessment surveys

- graduation rates - post-graduate outcomes

* NOTE ON TRANSFER STUDENTS: Transfer students enter at various points with varying amounts of earned credits and types of degrees (from within and outside CUNY). Transfer students will engage in the Core Advisement Learning Opportunities identified at junctures appropriate to their previous experience.