Renaissance allegory

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Text of Renaissance allegory

  • 1. The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011

2. Themes: Classical mythology Nature (Botany) Spring (The Weather) Marriage Love (Platonic) Re-birth (Renaissance) PoetrySunday, 6 March 2011 3. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 4. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 5. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 6. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 7. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 8. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 9. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 10. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 11. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 12. Composition male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 13. Composition male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 14. Compositionfemale male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 15. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 16. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 17. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 18. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 19. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 20. Compositionfemale female male maleThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 21. Composition Technique:female femalebalancemale male order harmonyframingrhythmcontrolstructuresymmetryrepetitionThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 22. Composition Technique: Effects:female femalebalancemale male owing order sinuous harmony serpentineframing gentlerhythm gracefulcontroldelicatestructurevibrantsymmetry mysteriousrepetitionidealisedThe Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 23. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 24. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 25. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 26. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 27. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 28. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 29. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 30. The Gaze ? The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 31. The Gaze ?? The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 32. Allegory: An allegory is a device used to present an idea, principle or meaning, which can be presented in literary form, such as a poem or novel, or in visual form, such as in painting or sculpture. Allegory communicates its message by means of symbolic gures, actions or symbolic representation.Sunday, 6 March 2011 33. Allegory The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 34. AllegoryZephyrus The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 35. AllegoryZephyrusChloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 36. Allegory Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 37. AllegoryThe GracesZephyrusFloraChloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 38. Allegory MercuryThe GracesZephyrusFloraChloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 39. AllegoryCupid MercuryThe GracesZephyrusFloraChloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 40. AllegoryCupid MercuryThe GracesVenus ZephyrusFloraChloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011 41. Platonic Love: The term amor platonicus was coined as early as the 15th century by the Florentine scholar Marsilio Ficino. Platonic love in this original sense of the term is examined in Platos dialogue the Symposium, which has as its topic the subject of love or Eros generally. With genuine platonic love, the beautiful or lovely other person inspires the mind and the soul and directs ones attention to spiritual things. One proceeds from recognition of the beauty of another to appreciation of beauty as it exists apart from any individual, to consideration of divinity, the source of beauty, to love of divinity.Sunday, 6 March 2011 42. The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, c.1486Sunday, 6 March 2011 43. Patronage: Along with Da Vinci and Michelangelo, Botticelli was supported by Lorenzo deMedici, a member of the ruling family of fteenth century Florence, Italy. Lorenzo, while a poor business man was successful at promoting the arts and philosophical learning. He secured patrons for his favoured artists; he supported Neoplatonic debate that fuelled the development of humanism. Lorenzos humanistic inuence in Botticellis work can be seen in the neopagan themes in his most famous paintings, The Birth of Venus and Primavera. A few of his earlier religious works include members of the Medici clan-- for example, portraits of Cosimo, Giovanni and Giuliano de Medici appear in the Adoration of the Magi. Pope Sixtus IV was briey a patron of Botticelli. Sixtus IV summoned him to work on the Sistine Chapel. Scenes from the Life of Moses is one of the frescos he painted on the north and south walls of the chapel. His paintings in the Sistine Chapel did not achieve the fame of those completed by Michelangelo, and in fact are not considered some of his best work.Sunday, 6 March 2011