Rebuilding Lives:

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New Strategies for a New Era. Rebuilding Lives:. Community Shelter Board. A leader in Franklin County for 21 years. No one should go homeless, for even one night, in Columbus.. Mel Schottenstein. Focus on Rebuilding Lives. Launched in 1999 Focus on people homeless for a long time. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript

  • New Strategies for a New EraRebuilding Lives:

  • Community Shelter BoardA leader in Franklin County for 21 years No one should go homeless, for even one night, in Columbus.Mel Schottenstein

  • Focus on Rebuilding LivesLaunched in 1999Focus on people homeless for a long timeCommons at Chantry

  • Research Findings

  • Homeless in Franklin County7,000+ men, women and children

  • At the outset of the study period, shelter programs were concentrated in downtown Columbus (63% of all beds).

    By 2006, 70% of shelter units were located in other zip codes. Improved Geographic Distribution

  • Daily Cost of Emergency ShelterNote: Excludes Youth Shelter, which is undesignated by gender.

    Chart2

    14.21689663146.204914050865.1607762254

    234179

    Single Male

    Single Female

    Families

    Year

    Daily Cost Per Unit (in 2006 dollars)

    Emergency Shelter Daily Cost Per Unit -Males, Females, Families

    $14

    Sheet1

    For each Table: All figures are shown in 2006 dollars.

    TABLE #6A: Emergency Shelter Cost Per Unit - All Programs

    Single MaleSingle FemaleYouthFamilies

    YearTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit CostTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit CostTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit CostTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit Cost

    1998$2,318,8184433$14$5,355$1,348,761.72381$46$16,652$786,075.91112$179$65,507$2,607,6425110$65$23,705

    2006$3,452,8185417$23$8,280$1,532,055.004103$41$14,874$886,145.00116$152$55,384$3,662,3204127$79$28,837

    TABLE #6B: Emergency Shelter Cost Per Unit - Excludes Choices, Huckleberry, and Maryhaven

    Single MaleSingle FemaleFamily Unit

    YearTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit CostTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit CostTotal CostNum. of ProgramsTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit Cost

    1998$2,318,8184433$14$5,355$846,615.01275$31$11,288$2,105,4954103$56$20,442

    2006$2,602,6364375$19$6,940$947,223.00289$29$10,643$3,239,4273120$74$26,995

    TABLE #6C: Emergency Shelter Cost Per Unit - Choices

    YearTotal CostTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit Cost

    1998$502,14713$105$38,626

    2006$422,89313$89$32,530

    TABLE #6D: Emergency Shelter Cost Per Unit - Huckleberry House

    YearTotal CostTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit Cost

    1998$786,07612$179$65,507

    2006$886,14516$152$55,384

    TABLE #6E: Emergency Shelter Cost Per Unit - Maryhaven Engagement Center

    YearTotal CostTotal UnitsDaily Unit CostAnnual Unit Cost

    2006$1,012,12150$55$20,242

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • Making a differenceDecrease in shelter admissions

  • Success for familiesImpact: More families in housingData for 2001-2002 is unavailable.

  • Emergency Shelter Results and OutcomesHousing OutcomesFamily shelters improved housing outcomes to almost 70% by 2007.

    Single adult housing outcomes also improved. Return to Shelter and Multiple Shelter UseSingle men (36.4%) and women (25.9%) return to shelter at relatively high rates.

    For families, repeat shelter episodes are a considerably rarer event (10%).

  • What is the overlap with other programs and systems of care?Huckleberry House

    5.9% of Huck House youth also accessed adult emergency shelter services at some point.

    No substantial relationship between the youth and the adult shelter stays.

    Minimal cross-over between the shelters.

  • What is the overlap with other programs and systems of care?CHOICES

    34.4% of women served by CHOICES had also a record of stay in the adult emergency shelter system.

    High percentage of single adult women entering shelter in a short period of time after their exit from CHOICES.

    Substantial cross-over, more likely for women of black race and with no children.

  • What is the overlap with other programs and systems of care?ADAMH: the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Board

    21.7% and 18.2% of the single adults accessing shelter received mental health and substance abuse services, respectively.

    The longer people stay in shelter, the more likely they are to access ADAMH and consume a disproportionately high share of services.

    ADAMH service use shows dramatic increase in the month prior to shelter entry.

  • What is the overlap with other programs and systems of care?Franklin County Childrens Services (FCCS)

    56% of adult women in shelter with families and 46.9% of single women had records of FCCS cases when they were children.

    14.7% of adult men in shelter with families and 22.8% of single men had records of FCCS cases when they were children.

  • What is the overlap with other programs and systems of care?Franklin County Department of Job and Family Services

    Single Adults and Families receiving ongoing benefits at entry or initiated while in shelterSingle AdultsFamiliesMedicaid10.8%74.1%Food Stamps35.2%63.7%Disability Assistance11.6%5.4%TANF26.0%

    10.6%Childcare Assistance

  • Services are currently provided by multiple programs in a scatter shot approach with limited emphasis on housing placement.Nine (9) programs provide a variety of services with 33 FTE staff.Only 6% of FTEs use a Housing First approach

    Homeless Outreach

  • Permanent supportive housingTotal of 1,292 in virtually every ZIP code

  • Permanent Supportive Housing ResidentsAverage 42.3 years oldAlmost three-quarters were male Two-thirds of them were blackOnly 12% reported being employed at the time of moving into this housing. 59% reported zero income at admission.

  • Supportive housing works70% stayed housedReduced the use of shelters - only 9% return to homelessnessIncreased employment and benefits (30% gained access to benefits) Greater independence Lower costs than institutional settings

  • Rebuilding Lives Program Impact on Shelter UtilizationShelter Use by Rebuilding Lives Residents vs. Control Group

  • Changes in Supportive Housing Capacity Over Time By Program Type

  • Funding Sources for Rebuilding Lives Programs, 2006, by Local, State, Federal

    SourceAmountPercent Local$ 3,289,49640%State$ 135,6752%Federal$ 4,858,75158%

  • What is the overlap with other systems of care?ADAMH, the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Board

    ADAMH services use decreased by 6.1% from pre-admission to post-placement into the RL-PSH unit

    Drastic reduction in substance abuse services

    Increase in outpatient mental health services

  • What is the overlap with other systems of care?Franklin County Childrens Services (FCCS)

    58% of adult women RL PSH had records of FCCS cases when they were children

    13% of adult men in RL PSH had records of FCCS cases when they were children

  • What is the overlap with other systems of care?Franklin County Department of Job and Family Services

    Single Adults receiving benefits at entry or initiated while in RL PSH At EntryInitiated after entryTotalMedicaid17.4%5.1%22.5%Food Stamps50.5%17.9%68.4%Disability Assistance24.7%5.5%30.2%

  • What are the answers? New Rebuilding Lives strategy

  • 100+ community leaders

  • Rebuilding LivesAccess Making sure community resources are available to prevent or end homelessness

  • Rebuilding LivesCrisis responsePreventing and resolving housing crises as quickly as possible

  • Making it workSingle point of access to emergency shelter for adults

  • Rebuilding LivesTransitionGuiding exits from homelessness to stable housing

  • Making it workDeveloping 1,400more supportive housing units

  • Rebuilding Lives Advocacy Leveraging public policy to work toward ending homelessness

  • Questions?

  • Community Housing NetworkCommunities In SchoolsGladden Community HouseHomeless Families FoundationLutheran Social Services/Faith MissionMaryhavenNational Church ResidencesThe Salvation ArmySoutheast, Inc./Friends of the HomelessVolunteers of America of Greater OhioYMCA of Central OhioYWCA Columbus

  • community shelter board111 liberty street, suite 150 columbus, ohio 43215614 221 9195www.csb.org

    **Thank you Erica and thank you for allowing me to be here today. I will talk today about the progress our community is making with our Rebuilding Lives initiative. Ill review the research findings from the evaluation of the homeless service system in our community from 1998 through 2006 and how that research is influencing public policy around homelessness in our community.

    Please feel free to ask questions anytime during the presentation.*No one should be homeless, for even one night, in Columbus thats our core philosophy, and it began with our founder and local entrepreneur, Mel Schottenstein.*Our mission is ending homelessness by rebuilding lives. We do this through innovative solutions, collaborations, and investments in quality programs.

    This work is made possible by the longstanding and generous support of the City of Columbus, the Franklin County Board of Commissioners, the United Way of Central Ohio, and other donors.*Launched in 1999, the Rebuilding Lives initiative focused on serving persons who were disabled and experienced a long history of homelessness. The end-result of the initiative was a complete redesign of our shelter system and a considerable growth in our permanent supportive housing units *Our new Rebuilding Lives strategy just unveiled involved an 18-month process to create a comprehensive plan to guide the homeless services system in the future. We were h