1
1665 one in Paisley. In Glasgow the weekly report issued on June 7th showed that there were at that time 104 cases nnder treatment. In Belfast during the week ended June 8th ten deaths from this cause were registered. THE CHILD’S HOLIDAY. THE health of the little ones who live in the poorer and generally unhealthier areas of our great cities is a matter of the first importance to us all. Not only humanity but self- interest, our interest in our population, insures this. To give these children when living in London a fortnight’s holiday in the country does not at once fit them to become either useful workers and desirable members of the com- munity or healthy parents of a new generation, but it affords an admirable stimulus to all manifestations of their physical and moral progress, and therefore the Children’s Country Holiday Fund deserves the best support which we can give. Entirely unsectarian in its character, the society year by year extends its good work and is only limited in its operations by the amount of the subscrip- tions which it receives from the public. From the annual report which has just been issued we learn that during the year 1906 43,442 children were sent to country cottages in the south of England, and the executive of the society expect that during the forthcoming season there will be an even greater demand upon the fund for assistance. When it is remembered that there are more than 800,000 children on the rolls of the London (including West Ham) schools 43,000 appears as but a small proportion to whom to extend the advantages of a visit to the country, particularly when we remember that quite possibly one-half of the elementary school population of London never leave the metropolis for a single night throughout the year unless they happen to be among those selected for a country holiday. The report of the fund, which can be obtained from the secretary, should be read by all who take an interest in what someone has described as "God’s problem awaiting man’s solution-the little child." Contributions should be sent to the secretary or the treasurer at the central offices of the fund, 18, Buckingham-street, Strand, London, W.C. RAYNAUD’S DISEASE. IN the Western Canada Medical Joacrnal for April of this I year Dr. G. A. Gibson of Edinburgh publishes some interest- ing observations on R3,ynaud’s disease. He deals only with those cases in which the origin of the symptoms is obviously reflex in character and describes two instances in which the ordinary clinical symptoms of the malady were well marked. They were both men, one being 18 and the other 23 years of age. Ordinary treatment proved of no avail, and as Dr. Gibson considered that the condition might be produced by renal mobility, in each case the operation for fixation of the kidney was performed. In the first case the effect of the operation was remarkable. The patient was kept on his back for a month after its performance, and when he was allowed to get up it was found that all the symptoms of Raynaud’s disease had disappeared. Although the weather was still cold, the discolouration of the affected parts of the body had disappeared, and the contraction of the veins never recurred. The result in the second case was equally satis- factory. Dr. Gibson records these cases as excellent illustra- tions of a variety of Raynaud’s disease having its origin in reflex disturbances and falling into the same category as the angina pectoris vaso-motona of Landois and Nothnagel. It might, of course, be suggested that mobility of the kidney is in itself scarcely sufficient to produce such widespread disturb- ances as are found in connexion with Raynaud’s disease. Dr. Gibson points out, however, that moveable kidney is a fertile source of palpitation and of tachycardia and he believes that there can be no doubt of its power to bring about all the vaso-motor changes which are summed up under- the title of Raynaud’s disease. "GREATEST OF THESE." WE have received a letter from Mr. Sigismund Goetze giving his reasons for thinking that our recent allusion tc> his picture, which bears the above title and which is now on exhibition at Burlington House, was unfair. Mr. Sigismund Goetze’s letter was marked " Private or we should have been happy to publish it. The words to which exception is taken were as follows : " The central figure is a lady suckling a child of four, which is somewhat of a physio- logical exploit" ; and the question is how old the infant which he has painted appears to be. We have scrutinised the picture closely since Mr. Goetze’s letter of protest and we have come to the conclusion that the truth lies some- where between Mr. Goetze’s intention and our critic’& estimate. The infant does not look four years old and we regret that needless exaggeration should have been employed in such a way as to give pain to the artist. But we find the infant too big, too muscular, and too old-looking as displayed in Mr. Goetze’s picture for the occupation in which he is depicted. - ST. PANCRAS MOTHERS’ AND INFANTS’ SOCIETY. As a result of the efforts of Dr. J. F. J. Sykes, the medical officer of health of the borough of St. Pancras, a good deal has been done in that neighbourhood to encourage the natural feeding of their infants by poor mothers and to discourage as far as possible artificial feeding. In this endeavour he has been assisted by a band of lady health visitors and it would appear by the infant mortality rate in St. Pancras last year that some measure of success has been attained. A further step in the same direction is now contemplated by the establishment of the above society. It has for its object the provision of a school for nursing mothers to which they will be invited to go to learn how a baby should be clothed, fed, washed, and tended. It is proposed to have a trained teacher on duty at certain times to give practical instruction on the babies themselves. The mothers are to be taught how to feed their babies and how to cut out and make baby clothes, and if it is found that they take kindly to such teaching it is hoped that cooking, nursing, hygiene, and needlework classes may also be organised. A special feature is an attempt to attract newly married girls to go to the Mothers’ and Babies’ Welcome, as the institution is appropriately to be named. A further suggestion is that in order to assist the poor mothers properly to nurse their babies cheap dinners, which will be utilised as object lessons in the economical preparation of nourishing food, shall be provided at a small cost. A department is also to be formed in which non-nursing mothers, on the production of a certificate from- a medical practitioner, a dispensary, or a hospital, will be taught how to procure pure milk and the best methods of hand-feeding. It is also intended to establish a provident club for parents to encourage the forming of some provision during the time when the mother is laid up, a consulting-room where mothers and babies may be examined and advised, and a bureau for fathers where their circumstances may be in- vestigated and advice given, we presume as to the obtaining of work. As it is obvious that a scheme of this kind cannot be initiated without a good deal of expense an appeal is being made to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood to subscribe- towards the expenses of the Mothers’ and Babies’ Welcome. The scheme is one of considerable interest and should prove, if properly and efficiently carried out, a great boon to the poor mothers of St. Pancras. It is founded partly on the- scheme which has been started in Chelsea for providing

RAYNAUD'S DISEASE

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1665

one in Paisley. In Glasgow the weekly report issued onJune 7th showed that there were at that time 104 casesnnder treatment. In Belfast during the week endedJune 8th ten deaths from this cause were registered.

THE CHILD’S HOLIDAY.

THE health of the little ones who live in the poorer and

generally unhealthier areas of our great cities is a matter ofthe first importance to us all. Not only humanity but self-interest, our interest in our population, insures this. To

give these children when living in London a fortnight’sholiday in the country does not at once fit them to become

either useful workers and desirable members of the com-

munity or healthy parents of a new generation, but it affordsan admirable stimulus to all manifestations of their physicaland moral progress, and therefore the Children’s CountryHoliday Fund deserves the best support which we can

give. Entirely unsectarian in its character, the societyyear by year extends its good work and is only limitedin its operations by the amount of the subscrip-tions which it receives from the public. From the

annual report which has just been issued we learn thatduring the year 1906 43,442 children were sent to countrycottages in the south of England, and the executive of thesociety expect that during the forthcoming season therewill be an even greater demand upon the fund for assistance.When it is remembered that there are more than 800,000children on the rolls of the London (including West Ham)schools 43,000 appears as but a small proportion to whom toextend the advantages of a visit to the country, particularlywhen we remember that quite possibly one-half of the

elementary school population of London never leave the

metropolis for a single night throughout the year unless theyhappen to be among those selected for a country holiday.The report of the fund, which can be obtained from thesecretary, should be read by all who take an interest in whatsomeone has described as "God’s problem awaiting man’ssolution-the little child." Contributions should be sent tothe secretary or the treasurer at the central offices of thefund, 18, Buckingham-street, Strand, London, W.C.

RAYNAUD’S DISEASE.

IN the Western Canada Medical Joacrnal for April of this I

year Dr. G. A. Gibson of Edinburgh publishes some interest-ing observations on R3,ynaud’s disease. He deals only withthose cases in which the origin of the symptoms is obviouslyreflex in character and describes two instances in which the

ordinary clinical symptoms of the malady were well marked.They were both men, one being 18 and the other 23 yearsof age. Ordinary treatment proved of no avail, and as Dr.Gibson considered that the condition might be produced byrenal mobility, in each case the operation for fixation ofthe kidney was performed. In the first case the effectof the operation was remarkable. The patient was kept onhis back for a month after its performance, and when hewas allowed to get up it was found that all the symptomsof Raynaud’s disease had disappeared. Although the weatherwas still cold, the discolouration of the affected parts of thebody had disappeared, and the contraction of the veins neverrecurred. The result in the second case was equally satis-factory. Dr. Gibson records these cases as excellent illustra-tions of a variety of Raynaud’s disease having its origin inreflex disturbances and falling into the same category as theangina pectoris vaso-motona of Landois and Nothnagel. It

might, of course, be suggested that mobility of the kidney isin itself scarcely sufficient to produce such widespread disturb-ances as are found in connexion with Raynaud’s disease.Dr. Gibson points out, however, that moveable kidney is afertile source of palpitation and of tachycardia and hebelieves that there can be no doubt of its power to bring

about all the vaso-motor changes which are summed up under-the title of Raynaud’s disease.

"GREATEST OF THESE."

WE have received a letter from Mr. Sigismund Goetzegiving his reasons for thinking that our recent allusion tc>

his picture, which bears the above title and which is now onexhibition at Burlington House, was unfair. Mr. SigismundGoetze’s letter was marked " Private or we should havebeen happy to publish it. The words to which exceptionis taken were as follows : " The central figure is a ladysuckling a child of four, which is somewhat of a physio-logical exploit" ; and the question is how old the infantwhich he has painted appears to be. We have scrutinisedthe picture closely since Mr. Goetze’s letter of protest andwe have come to the conclusion that the truth lies some-where between Mr. Goetze’s intention and our critic’&estimate. The infant does not look four years old and we

regret that needless exaggeration should have been employedin such a way as to give pain to the artist. But we find

the infant too big, too muscular, and too old-looking asdisplayed in Mr. Goetze’s picture for the occupation inwhich he is depicted.

-

ST. PANCRAS MOTHERS’ AND INFANTS’SOCIETY.

As a result of the efforts of Dr. J. F. J. Sykes, the medicalofficer of health of the borough of St. Pancras, a gooddeal has been done in that neighbourhood to encourage thenatural feeding of their infants by poor mothers and todiscourage as far as possible artificial feeding. In this

endeavour he has been assisted by a band of lady healthvisitors and it would appear by the infant mortality rate inSt. Pancras last year that some measure of success hasbeen attained. A further step in the same direction is now

contemplated by the establishment of the above society. Ithas for its object the provision of a school for nursingmothers to which they will be invited to go to learn howa baby should be clothed, fed, washed, and tended. It is

proposed to have a trained teacher on duty at certain timesto give practical instruction on the babies themselves. Themothers are to be taught how to feed their babies and howto cut out and make baby clothes, and if it is found thatthey take kindly to such teaching it is hoped that cooking,nursing, hygiene, and needlework classes may also be

organised. A special feature is an attempt to attract

newly married girls to go to the Mothers’ and Babies’

Welcome, as the institution is appropriately to be named.A further suggestion is that in order to assist

the poor mothers properly to nurse their babies cheapdinners, which will be utilised as object lessons in theeconomical preparation of nourishing food, shall be providedat a small cost. A department is also to be formed in whichnon-nursing mothers, on the production of a certificate from-a medical practitioner, a dispensary, or a hospital, will betaught how to procure pure milk and the best methods ofhand-feeding. It is also intended to establish a providentclub for parents to encourage the forming of some provisionduring the time when the mother is laid up, a consulting-roomwhere mothers and babies may be examined and advised,and a bureau for fathers where their circumstances may be in-

vestigated and advice given, we presume as to the obtainingof work. As it is obvious that a scheme of this kind cannotbe initiated without a good deal of expense an appeal is beingmade to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood to subscribe-towards the expenses of the Mothers’ and Babies’ Welcome.The scheme is one of considerable interest and should prove,if properly and efficiently carried out, a great boon to thepoor mothers of St. Pancras. It is founded partly on the-scheme which has been started in Chelsea for providing