Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle ¢â‚¬¢ We will start with a picture capturing the

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle ¢â‚¬¢ We will start...

  • 10/6/2017

    1

    Putting Together the Pieces of Your Financial Puzzle Lyons Township Adult & Community Education – October 5, 2017

    Kirk A. Kreikemeier, CFP®, CFA, FSA 4365 Lawn Avenue, Suite 5 Western Springs, IL 60558

    708‐246‐2366 kirk@pvwealthmgt.com

    • Bombarded with confusing topics but difficult to put in context

    • Implications of decisions seem overwhelming and not sure where to start

    • We will start with a picture capturing the broad financial cycle of life

    • Then will sharpen the focus on key areas and identify three action steps for each

    • Like a puzzle, will start with square edges (base understanding) before filling in pieces

    • No easy button ‐ leave tonight with checklist to do on own or with a professional

    Complete Financial Picture ‐ Fitting Pieces Together

    2

    Agenda

  • 10/6/2017

    2

    4365 Lawn Avenue, Suite 5    Western Springs, IL 60558  |  708 246‐2366  |  pvwealthmgt.com

    Income • Employment • Other (non‐investment) • Company Stock Options

    Checking Account

    Monthly Bills

    Mortgage/ Student  Loans ‐

    (good debt ‐ appreciating 

    assets)

    Outstanding  Balances ‐ credit cards (bad  debt ‐ depreciating 

    assets)

    Social Security / Medicare

    401K / Pensions

    IRA Account (Traditional and Roth)

    Health Savings Account

    529 Accounts

    Taxable Accounts (including reserve funds)

    Set Aside for Your Future

    6.2% SS + 1.45% Medicare1

    Future Goals

    Taxes

    Life Insurance / Annuities

    Estate Planning (Wills, POAs, Trusts)

    NOTES:  1. Employer also contribute 7.65%; extra 0.9% for income > $200k / $250K   2.   Invest gains only taxed upon withdrawal

    2

    Financial Plan Big Picture

    1. Know what you have

    2. Set goals and estimate costs

    3. How do you react to market risk?  How soon need the money? => Asset allocation

    4. Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    5. What accounts to open to back these goals and basics of investing

    6. Save for retirement expenses – where to begin!

    7. Save for portion of college you are paying – they grow quickly

    8. Focus on basic features of insurance and annuities

    9. Understand Social Security and Medicare

    10. Pull it all together, stress test and monitor – especially near retirement

    11. You retired!  Where does my paycheck come from?  Don’t forget taxes!  How long last?

    12. Leave your legacy by design, not default

    Summary of key areas

    4

    Checklist

  • 10/6/2017

    3

    1. Prepare a net worth report • List things you have (assets) and debts owed (liabilities); difference is net worth • Assets – taxable, tax deferred, personal • Liabilities – rate, funding an appreciating or depreciating asset

    2. Understand paycheck * • Start with gross pay and note FICA deductions • Then see amounts to savings, benefits, federal and state taxes

    3. Prepare ‘savings generator’ – i.e. a budget • On paper, spreadsheet or tools available • Start with gross pay, list savings (pay self first), expenses, taxes • Begin tracking actual; make sure going where want; “have to measure to manage”

    * Blog Post:  “Wrap the Gift of Financial Wisdom for the College Graduate”

    What have?  Money coming in?  Where does it go?

    5

    #1 – What Have,  In, Out

    Net Worth, Paycheck and Budget Examples

    6

    #1 – What Have,  In, Out

  • 10/6/2017

    4

    1. Identify items wanted in the future not covered by current job income • Emergency fund for unexpected; 3‐6 months’ expenses; keep liquid and safe • Retirement living, health costs and college are common • Travel that ends after x years; wedding costs; fun money • Changing homes?  State of residence may impact travel and taxes

    2. Estimate cost in today’s dollars with assumed inflation • Use current expenses as a guide and apply inflation • Health costs and college have higher inflation; fixed mortgage has none • Consider reduction in living expenses at advanced ages

    3. Prioritize into needs, wants, wishes • Able to focus if funds are tight • Determine portion of ‘needs’ covered by ‘annuity‐like’ income if wish

    Set your goals and estimate costs

    7

    #2 – Set Goals and  Estimate Costs

    Set your goals and estimate costs

    8

    #2 – Set Goals and  Estimate Costs

  • 10/6/2017

    5

    1. Complete risk questionnaire • Questions help determine how you react to market volatility • Range from general questions (custodian) to robust research‐based (Finametrica)

    2. Choose portfolio consistent with risk tolerance and time horizon • Key consideration is tolerance for loss and volatility of portfolio • Consider how soon need money – emergency fund, college savings, retirement

    3. Establish portfolios with various asset classes and different weights • Historically used 60/40 stocks/bonds; now – add international, refine stocks/bonds, alternatives • Different portfolios have same asset classes but % in asset class varies • Some ‘easy‐button’ funds – target‐date (retirement) and age‐based (529s) • See ‘#1 – Supplement’ at end for how different portfolios behave over past 20 years

    How handle market risk? How soon need money

    9

    #3 – Gut and time  => Allocation

    How handle market risk? How soon need money

    10

    #3 – Gut and time  => Allocation

  • 10/6/2017

    6

    1. Tax brackets and marginal rates • Progressive tax rate and how next dollar of income is taxed • Federal varies by single vs. joint filing; states range from 0% to flat % to progressive • Know what marginal bracket in now vs. what expect during retirement

    2. Ordinary income vs. capital gains/qualified dividends * • Wage income is ‘ordinary’; capital gains / qualified at lower rate • Some investment income is qualified, rest is non‐qualified => ordinary • Capital gains tax depends on time held; if  ordinary

    3. Tax qualified accounts ‐ deductible, deferred, taxed when withdrawn? • Taxing the seed or harvest?  Limitations on withdrawals?  Apply to federal and state? • What tax bracket when deducted vs. withdrawn?  Ordinary income or qualified?

    *  Extra 3.8% Medicare taxes on investment income > $200k (single), $250k (joint)

    Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    11

    #4 – Tax Tidbits:  Fed and State

    Understand key tax brackets and concepts

    12

    #4 – Tax Tidbits:  Fed and State

  • 10/6/2017

    7

    1. Who holds the money and executes trades? • Custodian is firm where open an account ‐ brokerage, 401k, bank, insurance company • Investment range:  Brokerage ‐ full; 401k ‐ limited; bank – savings, CDs; ins co ‐ annuities

    2. Types of investment securities • Individual companies issue stocks and bonds • Mutual funds and exchange‐traded‐funds (ETFs) have basket of stocks or bonds for diversification • More refined strategies ranging from options, factor‐based funds, commodities, currency

    3. Type of underlying risk of investment • Know what type of stock or bond is inside a mutual fund or ETF owned • Should map to asset classes used for asset allocation • Morningstar Instant X‐Ray – not detailed asset class but good start; careful with bonds

    http://portfolio.morningstar.com/RtPort/Free/InstantXRayDEntry.aspx

    What accounts to open; basics of investing

    13

    #5 – Where Invest?   In What?

    What accounts to open; securities to invest

    14

    #5 – Where Invest?   In What?

    Individual stocks and bonds from single company Funds and ETFs own many Source:  BlackRock

  • 10/6/2017

    8

    1. How much to save?  As much as can.  Max tax‐qualified limits is good start. • Analyze if assets plus annual savings covers goals (see later) • Priority – emergency fund, 401k match max, HSA, better of 401k/IRA, 529 college savings

    2. Use tax‐qualified 401k / IRA accounts – Traditional vs. Roth * • 401k (company match!); Individual IRAs; Spousal IRAs (different deduct level) • Pay tax now (Roth) or withdrawal (Traditional); what tax bracket at each point? • Don’t forget about spousal IRAs; also maybe contribute to non‐deductible IRA • Can convert Traditional to Roth but must pay taxes at