Putney Post Spring, 2016

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  • Putney PostSpring 2016

  • Register now for PUTNEY REUNION 2016!

    Register and find weekend info: putneyschool.org/reunion

    802-387-6273 or alumni@putneyschool.org

    Classes of 194647, 1956, 1966, 198082, 199192, 199698June 1012, 2016

  • LV74 (RED ROOF), BY JANE DICKSON, 2012, OIL ON CANVAS, 48 X 30 INCHES ON THE COVER: BLUE BRIDGEGW1, 2007, OIL ON ASTROTURF, 58 X 32 INCHES PRATER 6, 2010, OIL ON WOOD, 18 X 18 INCHES

    2 Message from the Head of School Fostering broad and open minds

    4 Cover Artist: Jane Dickson 70

    Taking art to new places via the

    anti-craft ethos of the punk rock era

    6 News Oxfam Hunger Banquet, blood

    drive, student art show, sugaring,

    Chard deNiord, new solar array,

    winter concert, and more

    11 Doing Something Right A recent Putney graduate confirms

    that cultural fluency and collaboration

    are useful things in real life

    13 Graduation Requirements 2.0

    Moving from chair time

    to competency in defining

    Putney graduates

    23 Alumni News Alumni authors, events,

    and more

    27 Alumni Notes

    48 In Memoriam

    Contents

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    ThePutneySchoolVT

    theputneyschool

    The Putney School Network

    @putneyschool

  • 2 P U T N E Y P O S T

    When Mrs. Hinton founded Putney in 1935, she

    was able to staff it partly with Europeans fleeing

    the chaos that was overtaking their homelands.

    In those first years, the adult population was

    considerably more cosmopolitan than was the

    student body. In Putneys middle years, both adults

    and students were almost entirely Americans, and

    the few foreigners who broke the pattern are well

    remembered. Today we are a quite various and

    polyglot community, although the diversity of

    the faculty and staff lags well behind that of the

    students. Students homes are in 14 countries, and

    they hold passports from 17; these lists often dont

    overlap. Many of our students born and raised in

    the U.S. are frequently multi-cultural in one way

    or another, born to immigrant parents or two

    parents of very different backgrounds. Our adult

    community includes only natives of Afghanistan,

    China, England, France, Mexico, and the U.S., and

    despite our sincere efforts, is much less diverse

    than we would wish.

    All of this raises inevitable questions about

    curriculum. It is hard to identify a canon

    appropriate to this student body. If it is our

    responsibility to be sure that American students

    are well-versed in the history of their country,

    is it less important for Chinese students to know

    their own history? Or is it actually as important

    for students to learn each others histories? How

    can we best teach the habits of mind that will

    predispose students to understand other cultures

    and to work effectively with different people? We

    have terms abroad in China, France, England, and

    Mexico, and have recently approved a new one

    in Nicaragua. We have written into our new

    graduation requirements (see p. 13) that all

    students must spend a minimum of one month

    living in another culture. This does not mean a

    foreign country, just somewhere with a culture

    that differs significantly from the one they grew

    up in. We are gradually finding it easier to persuade

    students to spend time away from Putney, and

    Emily Jones

    Head of School

    A Message from the Head of School

    EDUCATION IS ABOUT MORE THAN

    SEAT TIME. HERE, HENRY 16, CURRENT CO-STUDENT HEAD OF SCHOOL AND

    CABIN DWELLER, TAKES A BREAK FROM

    HIS WORK IN A SCHOOL GREENHOUSE.

    Dear Putney alumni, parents, and friends,

    Broad-mindedness is related

    to tolerance; open-mindedness

    is the sibling of peace.

    Salman Rushdie

  • Sylvie Littledales presentation in assembly (see p. 17) provided a

    great vision of how opportunities can open up to a prepared mind.

    Without an open and at least somewhat educated mind, though,

    travelers are just tourists. We hope that with our diverse student

    body, our emphasis on inquiry, and our insistence that students

    spend time as a foreigner in another culture, we will help to

    foster genuinely broad and open minds.

    Emily

    f o u n d e r :

    c a r m e l i t a

    h i n t o n

    Emily H. Jones, Head of School

    20152016 TrusteesTonia Wheeler P99, Chair

    Ira T. Wender P77, 89, Vice ChairRandall Smith, TreasurerKatharina Wolfe, Clerk

    Supawat 16, Student TrusteeThanh Ha 17, Student Trustee

    Michael Sardinas, Faculty TrusteeLibby Holmes P15, 17, Faculty Trustee

    Lakshman Achuthan 84 John Bidwell 78

    Daniel Blood P15,18Dinah Buechner-Vischer P14

    Lee Combrinck-Graham 59 Freddy Friedman P12

    Joshua Rabb Goldberg 75 Stephen Heyneman 61

    Dana Hokin 84 Emily H. Jones

    Bill Kellett G02, 15 Joshua Laughlin 82

    Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 52 Franz Paasche 79

    Peter Pereira 52 Robert G. Raynolds 69

    Marni Rosner 69, P04, 07 Iris Wang P16

    Trustees EmeritiBarbara Barnes 41

    Kate Ganz Belin 62Joan Williams Farr 49

    Sarah Gray Gund 60Kendall Landis 42, P73, 79

    Bici Binger Pettit-Barron 48, P77, 79, G07

    The Putney Post is published twice

    yearly for the alumni, parents, and friends

    of The Putney School. We welcome your

    comments and ideas. Please direct your

    correspondence to: The Editor, Putney Post,

    Elm Lea Farm, 418 Houghton Brook Road,

    Putney, VT 05346; 802-387-6213;

    email: putneypost@putneyschool.org

    Editorial Board: John Barrengos,

    Don Cuerdon, Alison Frye, Emily Jones,

    Hugh Montgomery

    Publisher: Don Cuerdon

    Director of Communications

    Editor: Alison Frye

    Alumni Relations Manager

    Alumni Relations Manager: Alison Frye

    Photographs: Don Cuerdon,

    Anne Helen Petersen,

    Jeff Woodward,

    The Putney School archives

    Design: New Ground Creative

    Please send address corrections and

    new phone numbers to: Alumni Office,

    The Putney School, Elm Lea Farm,

    418 Houghton Brook Road,

    Putney, VT 05346;

    phone: 802-387-6213; fax: 802-387-5931;

    email: rlay@putneyschool.org

    The Putney School

    Elm Lea Farm

    418 Houghton Brook Road

    Putney, VT 05346

    802-387-5566

    www.putneyschool.org

    TO WORK NOT FOR MARKS, BADGES, HONORS, BUT TO DISCOVER

    TRUTH AND TO GROW IN KNOWLEDGE OF THE UNIVERSE . . .

    CARMELITA HINTON, FUNDAMENTAL BELIEFS, 1954

    Putney Post

    PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS MEMBERS EVALUATE AND DISCUSS

    THEIR WORK.

  • WWe caught up with Jane Dickson

    70 by phone in mid-February.

    She was in New Orleans starting

    an artists residency at the Joan

    Mitchell Foundation, which

    is good news all by itself. She

    was also celebrating the sale of

    her Fab 5 Freddy (the original

    Yo! MTV Raps veejay) portrait

    to the Smithsonians National

    Portrait Gallery, negotiating a

    122x20-foot mural in Brook-

    lyn for this summer, and had

    a show going entitled Pump

    Up the Volume, a two-person

    exhibition at Sacramento State

    featuring other hip-hop artists

    Jane had painted back in the

    day. Janes work has been shown

    from the Whitney to New Yorks

    42nd Street MTA station. See

    her website for a more complete

    list, but plan to be there a while.

    Janes first medium was paint, but

    her work encompasses printing,

    drawing, murals, mosaics, public

    installations, and more. The

    anti-craft ethos of the early New

    York City punk-rock era drove

    her from the fine art of oil-on-

    canvas to seeking ways to expand

    the medium. It all started with

    a painting of the World Trade

    Center on plastic garbage bags,

    which she also showed recently.

    The meaning in that bit of art

    had also expanded, as we all

    now know. The following are

    Janes own words about her

    work, her exploration of paint

    and texture, and other details

    of telling stories visually.

    I am a storyteller. I love

    weaving stories, hearing stories,

    so I guess I am telling stories

    by another means.

    I so appreciated Bill Hunt.

    Doing art at Putney was

    really, I think, crucial to my

    becoming an artistjust for

    the freedom that he gave

    us. Afterwards, I first went to

    art school for a year. I drew

    from a model every morning,

    and then Id go out to lunch

    with my friends. Sometimes,

    Id get back to my studio in

    the afternoon, sometimes I

    wouldnt, and I thought to

    myself, Oh, I must not be

    serious enough to be an artist.

    Im hanging out a lot, Im

    not working all the time.

    So I thought, I must not

    really be an artist. Id better

    go to university.

    I applied to Harvard and

    I got in. I told them I was

    going to be an anthropologist.

    I thought, Ill be Margaret

    Mead. It will be really fun,

    and Ill be naked on a tropical

    island. I discovered thats

    not exactly what you do

    as an anthropologist. You really

    spend your life at the library. I

    thought, Ehhh, I dont want to

    spend my life at the library, so

    I ended up being an art majo