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Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator — Lesson 3 Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator Handbook, 2 nd Edition Chapter 3 — Introduction to Apparatus Inspection

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  • Slide 1
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator Lesson 3 Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator Handbook, 2 nd Edition Chapter 3 Introduction to Apparatus Inspection and Maintenance
  • Slide 2
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 31 Learning Objectives 1.Define maintenance. 2.Define repair. 3.List reasons for preventive maintenance. 4.State the purpose of preventive maintenance. 5.List information that should be included in fire department maintenance SOPs. (Continued)
  • Slide 3
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 32 Learning Objectives 6.Identify the functions of apparatus maintenance and inspection records. 7.Explain reasons for keeping fire apparatus clean. 8.Discuss how overcleaning fire apparatus can have negative effects. 9.Answer questions about proper washing guidelines for fire apparatus. (Continued)
  • Slide 4
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 33 Learning Objectives 10.Answer questions about glass and interior cleaning of fire apparatus. 11.Recall information about waxing fire apparatus. 12.Clean the interior and wash and wax the exterior of a fire department apparatus. 13.Select facts about apparatus inspection procedures. (Continued)
  • Slide 5
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 34 Learning Objectives 14.Perform a walk-around routine maintenance inspection. 15.Select facts about maintenance of specific components and systems. 16.Perform an in-cab operational inspection. 17.Test new apparatus road and parking brakes. (Continued)
  • Slide 6
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 35 Learning Objectives 18.Answer questions about an engine compartment inspection. 19.Perform engine compartment inspection and routine preventive maintenance. 20.Charge an apparatus battery. 21.Perform daily and weekly apparatus inspections. 22.Lubricate chassis components.
  • Slide 7
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 36 Maintenance and Repair Maintenance Keeping apparatus in a state of usefulness or readiness Repair To restore or replace that which has become inoperable
  • Slide 8
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 37 Preventive Maintenance Ensures apparatus reliability Reduces the frequency and cost of repairs Lessens out-of-service time Purpose To try to eliminate unexpected and catastrophic apparatus failures that could put both firefighters and the public in mortal jeopardy and property at risk
  • Slide 9
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 38 Information Included in Fire Department Maintenance SOPs Who performs certain maintenance functions When maintenance is to be performed How detected maintenance problems are corrected or reported How the maintenance process is documented (Continued)
  • Slide 10
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 39 Information Included in Fire Department Maintenance SOPs Which items that driver/operators are responsible for checking and which conditions they are allowed to correct on their own How maintenance and inspection results should be documented and transmitted to the proper person in the fire department administrative system
  • Slide 11
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 310 Functions of Apparatus Maintenance and Inspection Records May be needed in a warranty claim to document that the necessary maintenance was performed Are likely to be scrutinized by investigators in the event of an accident Can assist in deciding whether to purchase new apparatus in lieu of continued repairs
  • Slide 12
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 311 Reasons for Keeping Fire Apparatus Clean Maintains good public relations Permits proper inspection, thus ensuring efficient operations Promotes a longer vehicle life
  • Slide 13
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 312 Negative Effects of Overcleaning Overcleaning can lead to the removal of lubrication from chassis, engine, pump, and other vehicle components, causing unnecessary wear on the apparatus.
  • Slide 14
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 313 Proper Washing Guidelines During the first six months after an apparatus is received, while the paint and protective coating are new and unseasoned, the vehicle should be washed frequently with cold water to harden the paint and keep it from spotting. (Continued)
  • Slide 15
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 314 Proper Washing Guidelines Never remove dust or grit by dry rubbing. Do not wash with extremely hot water or while the surface of the vehicle is hot. (Continued)
  • Slide 16
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 315 Proper Washing Guidelines Rinse loose dirt from the vehicle before applying the shampoo and water. This reduces the chance of scratching the surface when applying shampoo. Try to wash mud, dirt, insects, soot, tar, grease, and road salts off the vehicle before they have a chance to dry. (Continued)
  • Slide 17
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 316 Proper Washing Guidelines Never use gasoline or other solvents to remove grease or tar from painted surfaces. Use only approved solvents to remove grease or tar from nonpainted surfaces. Once a new vehicles finish is properly cured (according to the owners manual), either a garden hose with a nozzle or a pressure washer may be used to speed cleaning of the apparatus.
  • Slide 18
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 317 Glass Care Use warm soapy water or commercial glass cleaners. Do not use dry towels or rags by themselves, because they may allow grit to scratch the surface of the glass. Do not use putty knives, razor blades, steel wool, or other metal objects to remove deposits from the glass.
  • Slide 19
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 318 Interior Cleaning Use warm soapy water or commercial cleaning products to clean the surfaces of seat upholstery, dashboard and engine compartment covers, and floor finishes. Use particular cleaning agents or protective dressings if specified by the manufacturer. (Continued)
  • Slide 20
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 319 Interior Cleaning Be sure that the vehicle is well ventilated when using any cleaning products inside the cab or crew-riding area. (Continued)
  • Slide 21
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 320 Interior Cleaning WARNING! Do not use the following products to clean interior surfaces: cleaning solvents such as acetone, lacquer thinner, enamel reducer, and nail polish remover; corrosive or caustic substances such as laundry soap or bleach; and hazardous substances such as gasoline, naphtha, or carbon tetrachloride.
  • Slide 22
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 321 Waxing Fire Apparatus Is not necessary on many new apparatus Should not be done until the paint is at least six months old Should be done only after washing and drying the apparatus Should be applied with a soft cloth and buffed using a soft cloth or mechanical buffer
  • Slide 23
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 322 Apparatus Inspection Procedures Follow a systematic procedure based on departmental SOPs, NFPA standards, and manufacturers recommendations for inspecting the apparatus. The inspections discussed in this lesson should be performed by career personnel at the beginning of each tour of duty and by volunteers weekly or biweekly. (Continued)
  • Slide 24
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 323 Apparatus Inspection Procedures The circle or walk-around method starts at the drivers door on the cab and works around the apparatus in a clockwise pattern. If records from previous inspections are available review them to see if any problems were noted at that time. (Continued)
  • Slide 25
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 324 Apparatus Inspection Procedures
  • Slide 26
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 325 Parts of an Apparatus Inspection Approaching the vehicle Left-and right-front side (street and curb side or driver and officer side) inspection Front inspection Left- and right-rear side inspection Rear inspection In-cab inspection
  • Slide 27
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 326 Clutch Free Play The distance that the pedal must be pushed before the throw-out bearing actually contacts the clutch release fingers. Insufficient free play shortens the life of the throw-out bearing and causes the clutch to slip, overheat, and wear out sooner than necessary. (Continued)
  • Slide 28
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 327 Clutch Free Play Excessive free play may result in the clutch not releasing completely, which can cause harsh shifting, gear clash, and damage to gear teeth.
  • Slide 29
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 328 Steering Wheel Free Play Should be no more than about 10 degrees in either direction. Play that exceeds these parameters could indicate a serious steering problem that could result in the driver/operator losing control of the apparatus under otherwise reasonable driving conditions. (Continued)
  • Slide 30
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 329 Steering Wheel Free Play
  • Slide 31
  • Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 330 Braking System Most large, modern fire apparatus are equipped with air-operated braking systems. Smaller late-model apparatus and some older large apparatus are equipped with hydraulic braking systems. Most new apparatus, regardless of the brake system, are equipped with antilo

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