Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator Handbook 3rd ... Driver/Operator Handbook 3rd Edition Explain a systematic

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  • Chapter 2 — Apparatus Inspection and Maintenance

    Pumping Apparatus Driver/ Operator Handbook

    3rd Edition

  • Explain a systematic maintenance program.

    Learning Objective 1

    2–1

  • Comply with NFPA® standards

    Who? What? When?

    Method for reporting, correcting, and documenting

    activities

    Every department should develop SOPs for systematic apparatus maintenance.

    2–2

  • Apparatus maintenance responsibilities will vary by jurisdiction.

    2–3

    Driver/operators often fix minor

    deficiencies

    Certified mechanics fix more complex

    problems

  • NOTE

    The AHJ will determine the assignment of maintenance and repair in each department.

    2–4

  • Maintenance check at the beginning of

    each tour of duty

    Weekly or monthly detailed

    inspection

    Maintenance schedules vary by jurisdiction and differ based on staffing.

    2–5

  • REVIEW QUESTION

    What should systematic maintenance procedures specify?

    2–6

  • Explain the importance of accurate documentation, reporting, and follow-up for apparatus inspections.

    Learning Objective 2

    2–7

  • Procedure for documentation and communication

    Standardized written forms or computer programs

    Filing system for storage, retrieval, and review of records

    Inspection checklist for specific apparatus

    Each jurisdiction should establish inspection and maintenance policies.

    2–8

  • Discover needed repair

    Document per policy

    Notify supervisor

    Follow up in

    reasonable amount of

    time

    Take immediate action for serious issues

    Driver/operators should follow established policy for documenting, reporting, and following up on repairs.

    2–9

  • Documentation for warranty claim

    Evidence for accident investigators

    May assist when deciding to purchase or repair apparatus

    Apparatus maintenance and inspection records serve several different functions.

    2–10

  • REVIEW QUESTION

    What are the functions of apparatus maintenance and inspections records?

    2–11

  • Describe actions taken to ensure vehicle cleanliness.

    Learning Objective 3

    2–12

  • Clean apparatus

    Easier to inspect

    Promotes longer vehicle life

    Cleanliness of apparatus and onboard equipment is an important part of any inspection and maintenance program.

    2–13

  • Clean engine permits proper inspection for leaks

    Diesel fuel leaves a gummy residue

    Linkages, fuel injectors, and other controls in the engine become inoperable due to collection of dirt

    Mechanical defects more obvious if undercarriage is clean

    Components can be visualized more easily

    Apparatus and equipment are easier to inspect if they are free of dirt and grime.

    2–14

  • NOTE

    While fuel injectors do not have external moving parts, they are still a source of collected dirt and oil. This area should be checked and cleaned.

    2–15

  • Steam cleaning or high pressure washing

    • May remove lubrication from chassis, engine, pump, and underbody

    Complex network of wiring and connections • Use caution when employing high pressure cleaning

    equipment • May be necessary to perform routine lubrication

    Overcleaning the fire apparatus can have adverse effects.

    2–16

  • Driver/operators must ensure that the entire apparatus is clean and well maintained.

    2–17

    Washing Interior cleaning

    WaxingGlass care

  • REVIEW QUESTION

    Why is inspection of apparatus easier if the apparatus is clean?

    2–18

  • Summarize considerations for conducting an apparatus inspection.

    Describe actions taken to ensure batteries are operable.

    Learning Objectives 4-5

    2–19

  • Systematic inspection procedure

    SOPs

    NFPA® Standards

    Manufacturer recommendations

    A systematic approach to apparatus inspection helps ensure that all required items are checked.

    2–20

  • Operational readiness and pretrip road worthiness inspections are both conducted during a walk-around inspection.

    2–21

    Click image to

    play

  • NOTE

    IFSTA recognizes these descriptions as important minimum inspection points. The driver/operator is responsible to follow all jurisdictional laws, codes, and policies.

    2–22

  • Observe the following when approaching a vehicle for inspections.

    2–23

    Make observations about body damage, leaks, or other visibly apparent issues

    Observe terrain on which vehicle is parked

    Make sure indoor inspection areas are well ventilated

    Park vehicles outside for functional tests if weather permits

    Chock the wheels of a parked apparatus

  • CAUTION

    Diesel exhaust may contain up to 100 harmful chemicals and compounds. Do not run these engines in unvented areas for any period of time.

    2–24

  • Condition Cleanliness Damage

    Defects Functionality Leaks

    Presence of or missing

    items

    Driver/operators should conduct a visual inspection of the apparatus on both sides of the vehicle.

    2–25

  • Tread depth and

    separation Cupping

    Excessive wear on sidewalls

    Cuts

    Dry rotting Cracks

    Objects impaled in

    the tire

    Driver/operators should inspect vehicle tires and ensure that they are the correct type for the apparatus.

    2–26

  • NOTE

    The valve stem should not be cut, cracked, or loose. Valve stem caps should be in place.

    2–27

  • Once the exterior examination is finished, driver/operators may inspect the interior of the cab.

    2–28

    Adjust mirrors

    Adjust seats and seat belts

    Start engine

    Check dashboard instruments

    Check miscellaneous equipment stored in the cab

  • Newer apparatus may be equipped with an electrical load management system.

    2–29

    Load Sequencer

    Load Monitor

  • Insufficient free play

    Clutch slips, overheating,

    wear and tear

    The adjustment of the clutch pedal should be checked in apparatus with a manual transmission.

    2–30

    Excessive free play

    Clutch may not release completely

  • Driver/operators should inspect the steering system for proper adjustment and reaction.

    2–31

    Steering wheel play should be no more

    than 10 degrees either direction

  • Manufacturer determined

    Indicates maximum weight and tire pressure recommendation

    Load apparatus, then compare with GAWR

    Be aware of “overgrossed” vehicles

    Be familiar with GVWR placards and how to maintain vehicles accordingly.

    2–32

  • Not required to determine road

    worthiness

    Vital to maintain readiness for emergency incidents

    Many jurisdictions store fire and rescue equipment in the front or rear of the cab.

    2–33

  • Pumpers may be equipped with different braking systems depending on size and age of the apparatus.

    2–34

    Smaller or older apparatus

    Hydraulic brakes

    Larger or more modern apparatus

    Air brakes

    ABS

  • Evaluate

    Apparatus brakes should be thoroughly tested at least annually.

    2–35

    Braking ability of apparatus in

    motion

    Parking brake when apparatus

    is stopped

  • NOTE

    IFSTA considers the air brake testing procedures outlined in this manual to be the minimum acceptable daily air brake test; other laws or departmental policies may prevail as more restrictive.

    2–36

  • Engine compartment checks and maintenance should only be performed with the engine shut off.

    2–37

    • Fluid levels • Tilt cab controls • Cab latches

    Inspect engine compartment according to SOPs

  • CAUTION

    Before lifting the cab, be sure that there is adequate vertical clearance and secure all loose equipment in the cab.

    2–38

  • NOTE

    Many tilt cabs have inspection doors that allow a check of engine oil, coolant, and other fluids. However, the cab should still be lifted on a weekly basis for a thorough inspection of the engine compartment.

    2–39

  • Newer apparatus may be equipped with systems for cleaner emissions from diesel engines.

    2–40

    DPF SCR

    Periodically inspect the exhaust system

    • Cracks or leaks • Exhaust pipe and insulation • Joints and flex pipes

  • Effective lubrication depends on

    • Use of proper grade lubricant

    • Frequency of lubrication

    • Amount used • Method of

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