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Kay Gehshan Portfolio

Portfolio (2013)

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2013 Portfolio by Kay Gehshan.

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Kay Gehshan Portfolio

Your feet lead you to the shoreline. The water is welcoming as it meets your next step. Innocent splashes of salt water, tastes of what is to come. You dive in. You have never experienced water so calm. So warm for it being the month of November. Months and months at sea, sunny or overcast, the sea blue and sometimes silver from the sun’s reflection. You were simply floating, waves sailing your whole being to the middle of the ocean, or what seemed to be something vast and never-ending. You close your eyes, the wind and water are music to your ears. You feel water land on your cheek, scattered at first, then you hear a sound. It’s been so long since you heard a sound like this. It’s thunder. Clouds amplifying rumbles of thunder. Weeks without precipitation. It didn’t phase you, there was nothing to be frightened about. Rain is rain.

This wasn’t rain. This wasn’t anything close to a storm either. A derecho. Lightning and wind hit the surface of the sea creating instant wave pools. Raindrops like falling daggers. Learn how to swim or sink with no time to spare. The calm sea under a sunny sky has diminished; feels like it never happened. Fighting with every stroke as you swim, wanting to escape; find safety. Find land. It lasted for five weeks. Five weeks of fighting, yelling and relentless reevaluation of how you got to where you are right now.

The sea is calm, but gray and ruined. Floating and unsure where to go. You were in a battle with yourself. You knew what was right, but you didn’t know what you truly wanted. Wait for something or make a move. The untrusting sea appeared to have a low tide. It begins to fall shorter and shorter. You’re puzzled, scatterbrained, but you’re indifferent. Let it happen. The sea is nowhere to be found, as if a drain was unplugged somewhere at the bottom. Ground everywhere.

Your feet guide you to green grass. Where there was once sea, now are acres of land in every direction. Dirt, tall grass and trees. The trees had color. It was Autumn. You wandered and pondered; a year must have passed. It’s been so long since you have walked, one foot then the other. You were in love with the ocean, land didn’t stand a chance.

The more you learn, the more you find yourself at home in this place. You look up at a clear sky. Silent, still and peaceful. Your eyes skim the horizon and you squint at something. A golden peony, swaying on a windless day. You laugh. You laugh because you are that small flower. Surviving the storm. Standing tall, full of spright in a stagnant surrounding.

I wrote this narrative from personal experience and observation. The story is about a linear dreamscape consisting of sea and land that sets the reader as its traveler. This piece of writing was designed and produced in various forms in order to explore a diverse collection to present to its audience.

Jan Almquist Adjunct ProfessorElaine Johanson Advising Editor

Drift: A Personal Narrative

Your feet lead you to the shoreline. The water is welcoming as it meets your next step.

Innocent splashes of salt water, tastes of what is to come. You dive in. You have

never experienced water so calm. So warm for it being the month of November.

Months and months at sea, sunny or overcast, the sea blue and sometimes silver from the

sun’s reflection. You were simply floating, waves sailing your whole being to the middle

of the ocean, or what seemed to be something vast and never-ending. You close your eyes, the

wind and water are music to your ears. You feel water land on your cheek, scattered at

first, then you hear a sound. It’s been so long since you heard a sound like this. It’s thunder.

Clouds amplifying rumbles of thunder. Weeks without precipitation. It didn’t phase you,

there was nothing to be frightened about. Rain is rain.

This wasn’t rain. This wasn’t anything closeto a storm either. A derecho.

Lightning and wind hit the surface of the sea creating instant wave pools.

Raindrops like falling daggers. Learn how to swim or sink

with no time to spare. The calm sea under a sunny sky has diminished;

feels like it never happened. Fighting with every stroke as you

swim, wanting to escape; find safety. Find land.

It lasted for five weeks. Five weeks of fighting, yelling and

relentless reevaluation of how you got to where you are right now.

The sea is calm, but grey and ruined. Floating and unsure where to go. You were in a battle with yourself. You knew what was right,

but you didn’t know what you truly wanted. Wait for something or make a move.

The untrusting sea appeared to have a low tide. It begins to fall shorter and shorter.

You’re puzzled, scatterbrained, but you’re indifferent. Let it happen. The sea is nowhere

to be found, as if a drain was unplugged somewhere at the bottom. Ground everywhere.

Your feet guide you to green grass. Where there was once sea, now are acres of

land in every direction. Dirt, tall grass and trees. The trees had color. It was Autumn.

You wandered and pondered; a year must have passed. It’s been so long since you have walked, one foot then the other. You were in

love with the ocean, land didn’t stand a chance.

The more you learn, the more you find yourself at home in this place. You look up at a clear sky.

Silent, still and peaceful. Your eyes skim the horizon and you squint at something.

A golden peony, swaying on a windless day. You laugh. You laugh because you are that

small flower. Surviving the storm. Standing tall, full of spright in a stagnant surrounding.

jackfinney

for the first time in man’s

history, man is

desperate to escape

the present

visualizing issues: escapegraphic design departmentcommunications studiofall 2011, kay gehshan

alberteinstein

visualizing issues: escapegraphic design departmentcommunications studiofall 2011, kay gehshan

toescapefromthepersonallife intotheworld ofobjectiveperceptionandthought

rabihalameddine

onehas

toescapeoneself

todiscover

oneself

visualizing issues: escapegraphic design departmentcommunications studiofall 2011, kay gehshan

jackfinney

for the first time in man’s

history, man is

desperate to escape

the present

visualizing issues: escapegraphic design departmentcommunications studiofall 2011, kay gehshan

This project focused on the interpretation of the word, “escape.” One presentation combined varying images in a flipbook. Another production involved a series of posters that displayed image with text.

Richard Felton Professor

Visual Analogy of “Escape”

“Technology changes one’s psychic interior.” My senior thesis was a digital interface that presented information of how memory was first utilized centuries ago and how technological advancements have made us use our memory in different ways; therefore, ultimately changing our identities.

*Recipient of Graphic Design Senior Degree Project Citation Award

Jan Almquist Adjunct ProfessorElaine Johanson Advising EditorHans Allemann Guest CriticJoel Katz Professional Consultant

Blur

The House Project was divided into two, different concepts, both bound in separate books. The first concept focused on what “house” personally meant to me. The second concept focused on the appearance and atmosphere of my future “house.”

Christine Hiebert Adjunct Professor

The House Project

This print piece consisted of designing a typographic system for Linda Gertner Zatlin’s writing about Aubrey Beardsley’s drawing compositions and various motifs. The end result was a book that united image, content and design.

Rachele Riley Assistant Professor

Aubrey Beardsley

A one-week extensive with Dietmar Winkler on the fusion between two polar subjects and creating an original proposition. I combined philosophies from Leo Buscaglia and an excerpt from Linda Gertner Zatlin on Aubrey Beardsley’s drawing motifs. I produced a poster series that posited: “Finding oneself is the ultimate confrontation.”

Dietmar Winkler Guest Professor

Parallax Design of Beardsley & Buscaglia

This project concentrated on designing two, different, typographic systems for two books. The text expressed in both books were derived from the essay, “Art In Type Design,” written by Frederic W. Goudy from Texts on Type: Critical Writings on Typography, edited by Philip B. Meggs and Steven Heller.

Rachele Riley Assistant Professor

Systems for Texts on Type

By exploring typefaces derived from the Latin alphabet through pencil sketches, brush lettering and digital execution, I developed a typeface by hand that encompassed weight, proportion and alphabetic relationships.

John Connolly Master Lecturer

Type Analysis & Design

cognitioncognition

Goudy Modern MT; regular; 72pt

A N O N L I N E T Y P O G R A P H Y J O U R N A L

A N O N L I N E T Y P O G R A P H Y J O U R N A L

Myriad Pro; light caps; tracking: 230; 9.5pt

Cognition is an online typographic journal with featured essays that resonated the same aesthetic and essence of the essays by Frederic W. Goudy from Texts on Type: Critical Writings on Typography, edited by Philip B. Meggs and Steven Heller.

John Connolly Master Lecturer

Cognition

T H E F I R S T T H E F I R S T

T H E F I R S T T H E F I R S T

T H E F I R S T T H E F I R S T

A R G O N A U T S

ITC Legacy Serif, bookMyriad Pro, regular

A R G O N A U T S

A R G O N A U T S A R G O N A U T S

A R G O N A U T S A R G O N A U T Ssamothrace

lemnos

The Tale of Three Islands

imbros

coastal areas with low and soft relief

available fresh water

available fresh water

wetland access for aquatic resources

bays/areas for docking and landing

bays/areas for docking and landing

dunes/dry areas for camping

dunes/dry areas for camping

rock sources for chipped stone tools

The three islands: Lemnos, Samothrace and Imbros are found in the eastern Mediterranean. The interest of these islands is their quality of environment and what it has to offer for coastal for-gaing and seafaring in the time before the Neolithic period.

Six essential environmental factors have been compiled in the perspective of what the coastal forager would seek.

The environmental findings at the Neolithic sites on these islands present viable evidence of how seafaring began long before the spread of agriculture.

rock sources for chipped stone tools

1. coastal areas with low and soft relief

2. bays/areas for docking and landing

3. available fresh water

4. dunes/dry areas for camping

5. wetland access for aquatic resources

6. rock sources for chipped stone tools

Three Time Lines: 13,000 to 5,000 cal BC

C Y P R U S

L E VA N T

T U R K E Y

PPNA

PPNB

PPNC

Pottery Neolithic

Epipaleolithic

LevantSE Turkey

Epipaleolithic

PPNA

PPNB

Khirokitia

Pottery Neolithic

Pottery Neolithic

Epipaleolithic

Natufian

PPNA

PPNB

PPNC

?

Cyprus

cal BC

13,000

8,000

10,000

5,000

C Y P R U S

L E VA N T

T U R K E Y

An extensive project with archaeologist, Albert Ammerman, that consisted of his proposition that seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean occurred earlier than hunter-gatherers and that it should be separated from the origins of agriculture.

Joel Katz Adjunct ProfessorAlbert Ammerman ArchaeologistJoe Granato Project Co-Designer

The First Argonauts

2012CommunityPartnershipAwardPeople Working Togetherto Build Better Communities

®

Introduction

Advisory

03 Advisory Program04 Admissions policy05 Student agreement06 Attendance policy07 School-home partnerships08 School uniform policy

1

2

collegeboard.org

2012 Guide to College Board Schools

What Matters Most

While I interned at Ideas On Purpose, I worked on print and digital projects that focused on branding and identity for leading companies such as College Board, Mutual of America and Tyco.

John Connolly Creative DirectorDarren Namaye Creative DirectorMichelle Marks Creative & Online Strategy

Design Intern, Ideas On Purpose

Workspaces is a co-creative, web environment where users contribute before-and-after photographs of their workspaces for others to see and interpret what it may reveal about its worker.

Debra Drodvillo Associate Professor

Workspaces

Top Notch Cable Network is a corporate identity that encompasses the current and aspiring community of young entrepreneurs. Program highlights consist of workers who apply the following phrase into their daily lives, “do what you love, love what you do.”

Rachele Riley Assistant Professor

Top Notch Cable Network