PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II Course Outline - phy224_324/web-pages/  · PHY 324 H1S – page 1
PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II Course Outline - phy224_324/web-pages/  · PHY 324 H1S – page 2
PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II Course Outline - phy224_324/web-pages/  · PHY 324 H1S – page 3
PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II Course Outline - phy224_324/web-pages/  · PHY 324 H1S – page 4

PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II Course Outline - phy224_324/web-pages/  · PHY 324 H1S –

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  • PHY 324 H1S PRACTICAL PHYSICS II

    Course Outline - Winter 2018

    This is a practical course that further develops the core experimental and computational skills

    necessary to do Physics: mathematical models, computational simulations and solutions,

    experimental measurements, data and error analysis. Students are working in a team of two or three

    for the sections with an odd number of students. Laboratory experiments cover the following topics:

    - Electric DC and AC Circuits - Classic Experiments in Measuring Fundamental Constants (G, g, e, e/m, R, h) - Magnetic Fields - Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves - Wave Optics - Particle Physics - Quantum Physics - Thermal Physics

    Course Web Site: https://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-

    pages/New_Practicals224_324.htm and on the Portal.

    Course Coordinator and Supervisor of LEC0101:

    Dr. Natalia Krasnopolskaia.

    Office: MP 251A

    Office Hours: Wednesday, 12 14

    Tel.: 416-978-8803

    Email: natalia@physics.utoronto.ca

    Lecturer and Supervisor of LEC0201:

    Dr. Brian Wilson

    Office: MP 129D.

    Office Hours: By appointment.

    Phone: 416-978-4540.

    Email: brian.wilson@utoronto.ca.

    Laboratory Instructors:

    Marking Scheme:

    16 Weights for Experiments of Free Choice, including an option of

    Machine Shop Mini-Course (2 weights) and Open Project ( 4 weights) 72 %

    4 Weights for Exercises 18 %

    Computational Assignment 10 %

    TA/Lab Demonstrator Office Phone Email Section

    Mr. Nishant Bhatt MP 033/037 416-978-4395 nishant.bhatt@mail.utoronto.ca LEC02

    Alex Cabaj MP 605 416-978-2955 acabaj@physics.utoronto.ca LEC01

    Mr. John Feng MP 037 416-946-3099 kfeng@physics.utoronto.ca LEC01

    Mr. Hazem Daoud MP 918 hdaoud@physics.utoronto.ca LEC02

    Mr. Tailong He MP 602 416-978-2661 tailong.he@mail.utoronto.ca LEC02

    Mr. Robert Les MP 815 416-978-6632 rles@physics.utoronto.ca LEC02

    Mr. Xuesong Zhang MP 619A 416-978-2706 xzhang@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca LEC01

    Mr. Chao Zhang MP 078/093 416-946-7175 cha.zhang@utoronto.ca LEC01

    https://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/New_Practicals224_324.htmhttps://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/New_Practicals224_324.htm

  • Recommended Readings:

    1. J.R. Taylor: An Introduction to Error Analysis: The Study of Uncertainties in Physics Measurements, 2nd ed., University Science Books. 1997.

    2. P.R. Bevington, D.H. Robinson: Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Sciences,

    3rd ed., McGraw Hill. 2003.

    Mandatory Laboratory Exercises:

    There are four mandatory exercises scheduled to the first four sessions of the course:

    - Non-Linear Circuit Elements - Building a Thermocouple - Thick Lenses - Atomic Spectra.

    Each exercise takes one 3-hour session. Students are expected to assemble a setup; to make required

    measurements; to record all data; to make a photo or a drawing of the device; to estimate the result

    of measurements; to improve the experiment technique if the intermediate result is far from the

    expected one; to find all sources of experiment uncertainty and to show the results of measurements

    to a supervising instructor at the end of the session. A mark for the exercise is equivalent to a mark

    for a one-weight experiment. One weight is worth 4.5 % of the final course mark. Each team

    submits a paperless lab report on each Exercise by uploading it to the Portal in MS Word or PDF

    format. An identical copy is uploaded to turnitin.com for similarity check. Each report is graded

    with rubrics. Rubric for one weight is limited by 27 points. A missed lab session must be made up.

    Experiments of Free Choice:

    The lab experiments are booked by students in cooperation with a supervising instructor during the

    last half an hour of the preceding session. The list of experiments is posted to the web page

    https://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/experiments.pdf. Students are working

    in pairs. Each team of two students performs a combination of experiments that gives 16 weights in

    total. One weight is worth 4.5 % of the final course mark. The one-weight experiment takes one 3-

    hour lab session; and the two-weight experiment takes two 3-hours sessions. Each team submits a

    paperless lab report by uploading it to the Portal in MS Word or PDF format. An identical copy is

    uploaded to turnitin.com for similarity check. Each report is graded with rubrics. Rubric for one

    weight is limited by 27 points. A missed lab session must be made up.

    Computational Assignment:

    The Assignment is a piece of the term work made and submitted by each student individually. The

    Assignment report may be uploaded to the Portal, or submitted in a hard copy. Anyways, the report

    must be uploaded to the Turnitin. The task is posted to the Portal and the course web site on the

    page https://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/computational.htm. Students are

    required to study a description of mathematical techniques, study the datasheet and produce a

    Python code to process the given data with the required outcome. The report on the assignment

    must include: an introduction with physics background or description of the origin of the data to be

    processed; table of given data; description of the steps you made for writing the Python code (e.g.

    the modules used); a drawing of the result/function (if applicable) or the table of calculated values

    (if applicable); table and the discussion of uncertainties and their origin; a conclusion.

    Machine Shop Mini-Course (optional):

    This workshop is voluntarily taken by students as an equivalent of two weights of experiment work

    and is marked as a two-weight experiment. The activity gives practical skills in understanding

    technical drawings, processing a metal (aluminum) piece to create a part of a real machinery and to

    conclude on the quality of the product. This activity teaches students to make measurements and

    https://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/exercises.pdfhttps://www.physics.utoronto.ca/~phy224_324/web-pages/experiments.pdf

  • calculate uncertainties of the measurements of real objects, produced by the students. The workshop

    is taken in the Machine Shop of the Department of Physics under supervision of a qualified staff

    member. The report must include: a drawing of the part; a description of the measurements made; a

    statement on possible uncertainty due to the measurement tools used; a statement on possible

    uncertainty due to the workers omission; a description of the process of producing the part; a photo

    of the product; and a final statement on the product parts sizes and their uncertainties. The report is

    submitted in a hard copy to the machine shop supervisor and is graded by him.

    Open Project:

    The Open Project is an alternative to one or several experiments in the case the team of students

    cannot book an experiment of free choice by any reason. The Open Project is marked for so many

    weights as many 3-hour sessions it takes. The Open Project cannot take more than four three-hour

    sessions. The Project proposal must be prepared by the team of students at least one week in

    advance before the first session with this project. The first session is devoted to the project

    discussion with the lab section supervisor and lab technologist and preparation of the final version

    of the project that is approved at the end of the session by the lab section supervisor. The report on

    the Open Project must include: the objective of the project; the final version of the proposal; the

    description of the procedure; the schedule of the project execution; the table of measured and

    calculated quantities with the corresponding uncertainties; the description of functioning of the

    product (may be a code, or a device, or both); discussion of the project outcome; discussion of the

    uncertainties of measurements produced; and a conclusion. The report is submitted in electronic

    copy by uploading it to the Portal and Turnitin.com.

    Due Date:

    The reports on all kinds of activity listed above are uploaded to the Portal by one of the lab partners

    and are due in 6 days after the last session with the current experiment/project/assignment. E.g., if

    the last session is on Tuesday, the submission deadline is next week Monday midnight. If the last

    session is on Thursday, the submission deadline is next week Wednesday midnight. Late

    submission is penalized by taking off 5% of the assigned mark for every business day of the delay.

    The report, submitted in 5 or more business days after the deadline without a special permission, is

    not accepted and is graded with zero. Neither reports are accepted after April 10.

    Laboratory Report Requirements:

    The lab report is submitted to the Portal page of your section LEC0X01 and the Turnitin.com web site simultaneously. The report should not take more than 5 pages per one weight of the experiment. The

    report on a three-weight experiment should not exceed 12 pages.

    The mark for the report is composed with Rubric that can be found on the page of an assignment on

    the Portal. The rubric and graded report with markers comments are uploaded back to the Portal by a

    TA the experiment supervisor and marker.

    For a good grade, students are expected to prepare a lab report with all details of the experiment set